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BULLETIN 



o?py 



ANUARY 7, 1957 



Business-wise 

Analysis of 
the New Films 

Revieivs: 
HREE VIOLENT PEOPLE 
MAN IN THE VAULT 
EDGE OF THE CITY 
FULL OF LIFE 
HE GIRL CAN'T HELP IT 

SLANDER 
)N'T KNOCK THE ROCK 
SUN FOR A COWARD 

THE WRONG MAN 
KING AND FOUR OUEENS 
CRIME OF PASSION 



A LOOK 
INTO 57 



WHAT LIES AHEAD FOR MOVIE BUSINESS 



'Baby Doll'— 
The Picture & The Principle 





o 







D 
D 

0 








This is 

THE TOUGHEST 
YOUHG 
GENERAL 
IN THE 
U.S.ARMY 

I 



l/\//?y c/o f/?ey c<9// /?/'m 'Tronpanfs'r 



Susan Hayward and Kirk DougL 

and it's the laughiest war-of-the- 

w.th PAUL STEWART . jim BACKUS • Written by ROLAND KIBBEE and ALLAN SCOTT • Pro * : 




e having a "Top Secret Affair 

s since comedies grew up ! 



?ACKIN . MILTON SPERLING Supervising Producer . Directed by H.C. POTTER PRESENTED BY 



Warner Bros. 




COLOR by DE LUXE 

and Guest Stars 

JULIE LONDON RAY ANTHONY BARRY GORDON 

AND 14 ROCK N' ROLL HEADLINERS! 

Screenplay by FRANK TASHLIN and HERBERT BAKER 

Produced and Directed by FRANK TASHLIN 




Aewpoints 

JANUARY 7, 1957 ' VOLUME 25, NO. I 



A Look into 9 57 



What does 1957 hold for the mo- 
tion picture industry? While only a 
rash soothsayer would undertake to 
provide a precise answer, for the 
movies never have been — and cer- 
tainly not in the unsettled half- 
dozen years past — a precise busi- 
ness, sufficent solid evidence is at 
hand to draw certain conclusions. 

The atmosphere in which we enter 
'57 could hardly be termed wildly 
enthusiastic, but it might aptly be 
described as one of subdued, some- 
what nervous buoyancy. The harsh 
competitive experience we have 
undergone since 1950 has taught this 
volatile business to curb its exuber- 
ance. To the contrary, as a matter 
of fact, the whiplash of television 
chastened some among us far too 
much. Imagining themselves for- 
ever pursued by the long, dark sha- 
dows of antennas, film and theatre 
leaders alike fell to issuing the most 
dire predictions. We were teetering, 
they told us, on the brink of oblivion. 
Happily, the spectre is now not as 
frightening as it once was, and the 
entire industry appears to be adjust- 
ing its thinking and its operations to 
meet a formidable, but not neces- 
sarily destructive, competitor. 

The movie industry's morale is 
higher — and with good reason. After 
the stimulation afforded our business 
by the technological revolution in 
latter 1953 and throughout 1954, a 
worrisome slump struck in the last 
third of '55. It lasted through much 
of last year. But, the Fall of '56 
brought a most hopeful turn in our 
fortunes: the now traditional post- 
summer drop in business was far 
less severe than anticipated. 

Certain things have become clearer 
and they provide cause for encour- 
agement. Theatre business in 1957 
will assume a degree of stability; the 
level will not be as high as we desire, 
but neither will it dip as low as we 
once feared. Outstanding pictures 



will perform sensationally; average 
pictures will realize better grosses 
than in the past two years. The basis 
for these predictions is simple: there 
is plenty of evidence in reports from 
many sources that the public aware- 
ness of movies-in-theatres is rapidly 
reviving. And one of the factors 
supporting this trend is the gradual- 
ly recognizable diminution of TV's 
once unyielding hold on the public. 
It is inevitable that a steadily in- 
creasing section of the population 
will build up resistance to tele- 
vision's weak points — confinement, 
smallness, the bombardment of ad- 
vertising, etc. Movie attendance in 
1957 will grow in converse ratio to 
that inexorable decline in TViewing. 

We say with complete confidence 
that the cycle of public interest, 
which sometimes moves quite im- 
perceptibly, is turning our way. 
Millions of people, suddenly having 
their memories refreshed, via tele- 
vision, on the wonders of motion pic- 
tures, albeit old ones, are bound to 
start going out in increasing num- 
bers to taste some of the new prod- 
uct showing in theatres. 

The signs all point to a larger out- 
put of films in '57. 20th Century-Fox 
has led the way with an announced 
program of some fifty-five features, 
and, we believe, the other studios 
will be forced to step up their pro- 
grams, lest Mr. Skouras rake in a 



BULLETIN 



Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trad* Paper 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax, Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 123? Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa., LOcust 8-0950, 0951. 
Philip R. Ward, Associate Editor; Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan 6. 
Steck, Business Manager; Marvin Schiller, 
Publication Manager; Robert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: 522 Fitth Avenue, 
New York 34, N. Y., MUrray Hill 2-3631; 
Alt Dinhofer, Editorial Representative. 
Subscription Rates: ONE YEAR, S3. 00 
in the U. S.; Canada, S4.00; Europe, 
$5.00. TWO YEARS: $5.00 in the 
U. S.; Canada. $7.50; Europe, $9.00. 



disproportionate share of the theatre 
dollars. More pictures means more 
choice for exhibitors, more variety 
in theatre entertainment for the pub- 
lic, more boxoffice "sleepers", more 
new stars and creative talent, more 
revenue for the industry at large. 

Yes, 1957 is a year loaded down 
with promise for this wonderful in- 
dustry of ours. 

Print Duntuyt* 

It is more important than ever to our 
entire industry that every means of effect- 
ing logical economies be utilized. To that 
end. we reprint below this recommendation 
on preserving prints from the bulletin of 
Allied Theatre Owners of Indiana. 
During the last few months there 
has been increasing complaint about 
scratched and damaged prints. At 
the very least, such prints impair 
the finest picture presentation that 
every theatre is striving for and no 
amount of investment in booth 
equipment can produce a satisfac- 
tory picture from a bad print. 

ATOI's Equipment committee has 
been studying the problem and re- 
ports that much of the damage is 
traced to large sprocket prints being 
run on small sprocket equipment 
without proper adjustment. Thea- 
tres with small sprocket equipment 
must be very sure that pad idler 
rollers are correctly set. In the past 
an adjustment anywhere from l l / 2 
to 3 times the thickness of the film 
did no harm, but the small sprockets 
must be set exactly double the thick- 
ness of the film. It is also important 
that if the projectionist hears a 
heavy patch go through the machine 
that he make an immediate exami- 
nation to determine if the film has 
jumped off one side of the sprockets. 
There is no other way to know if the 
film is riding on top of one sprocket 
and the heavy patch can easily make 
the film jump out of the sprocket. 
Also, with the small sprockets it is 
more important that take-up tension 
be properly adjusted. Many theatres 
carry too much drag against the 
small sprocket. 



Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 Page 5 



WHO WILL BE THE NEXT 
VICTIM OF THE 



MAGAZINES? 




M-G-M brings America the FIRST 
inside story of how the scandal 
magazines operate! Millions of 
people get secret thrills from 
their lurid pages. Who spills the 
first hint of crime or illicit love? 
How is the "research" done? 
How are people forced to become 
"informers"? It's all revealed 
in "SLANDER"-sensational, 
hard-hitting, no-punches-pulled 
dramatic dynamite! 



M-G-M presents 

VAN JOHNSON 

ANN BLYTH 
STEVE COCHRAN 

SLANDER 

co-starring 

MARJORIE RAMBEAU • RICHARD EYER 
wrttrn b> JEROME WEIDMAN - SVSK 
Diiected by ROY ROWLAND * Produced by ARMAND DEOTSCH 

(Available in Perspecta Stereophonic or 1 Channel Sound) 



1956: CASSANDRA'S YEAR. Back in antiquity there 
lived an unfailing prophetess named Cassandra. Now, in 
those days the prophets specialized. Her particular cup of 
tea leaves, it seems, turned out to be foretellings of gloom. 
According to mythology, Cassandra might have gone about 
scaring mankind's wits out through the ages had she not 
needlessly provoked the ire of the god Apollo, who decreed 
that henceforth Cassandra's utterances be treated with 
utter derision. This injunction in no wise impaired the 
eventual accuracy of the fallen she-seer; it impaired only 
the opinion of her listeners. 

Cassandra proved an active spirit in bearish 1956. And 
moviedom proved equally active in honoring Apollo's shut- 
ear mandate. Industry leaders, plagued with their own dis- 
tresses, showed little patience with the dire forecasts of 
'gloom merchants", as they were termed, who seemed bent 
on contributing no more than carping criticisms, or at best, 
unsure reforms. Cinema leaders erred, however, in confus- 
ing their Cassandras. 

Three, four and five years ago, those who came to bury 
moviedom rushed in with hidden motivation, and for the 
most part represented interests alien to the film industry's 
good health. 1956's Cassandra utterances issued largely 
from elements financially and spiritually tied to moviedom, 
and whose desperation had grown so immense as to pro- 
voke an uncivil outcry. A roll-call of industry criticisms 
would turn up authors of such eminence as to fill a Who's 
Who: notable Wall Streeters, retired cinema leaders, im- 
portant stockholders, plus a coterie of professional indus- 
try commentators. Their common beef : moviedom is clear- 
ly not attuned to the times. 

That the public goes along with the foregoing is evident 
in the diminished earnings of most all film producers — and 
the large film exhibitors. The stock market which reflects 
to a rough extent a company's economic standing, is pre- 
pared to second the proposition. Note the year-long pat- 
tern of Film BULLETIN'S Cinema Aggregate below: 

Film BULLETIN Cinema Aggregate* 




FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 



By Philip R. Ward 

A more incisive study of moviedom's fall from grace may 
be had by observing the year end figures of the Cinema 
Aggregate since 1953. 



1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 



Film Companies 

< year end) ( gain or lot 
I I I % 

l78'/2 +60% 
l58'/2 -11% 
I 30 7 /s -17% 



The 



itre Companies 

md) (gain or loss) 



22% 
40% 
37 
31 'A 



+ 77% 
- 8% 
- 1 5 % 



FILM COMPANIES THEATRE COMPANIES 

"Composed of carefully selected representative industry issues. 



Thus in a gap of three short years, industry fortunes 
have assaulted, crested and descended the Matterhorn. If 
1954 proved the year of achievement, it also proved, 
perforce, the year of maximum attunement to the tides and 
rhythms of that time. Moviedom was on fire in '54 as the 
result of that mighty technical renaissance sparked first by 
ill-starred 3-D, then CinemaScope. It was a wonderful year 
of change, of novelty, of flexibility and advancement. But, 
too soon the industry settled back into a rut. 

O 

Creeping into nearly every Cassandra utterance of the 
past 12 months has been found a chilling fear of movie 
management's stiff-necked insensitivity to change. The 
expression takes various forms, but in most cases deals 
directly with stratification in economic spheres such as 
overheads, salaries, costs of production, physical plant, etc. 
But the danger invades the artistic sphere as well. Here, 
too, are found practices as fossilized as any in American 
industry. An executive of a leading New York money 
house told Financial Bulletin that movie management 
inertia in matters of routine industrial progress establishes 
the film business "in last place among domestic industries 
with an investment of a billion dollars or more." In the 
realm of day to day improvements, filmdom does practical- 
ly nothing, continued the spokesmen of this banking firm, 
who went on to contrast steps taken by film companies 
with those by industrial organizations at large on the sub- 
ject of heightening consumer acceptance. "The whole 
damn industry is asleep at the switch!" was his comment. 
And this from an institution which once underwrote, in 
part, three major production companies. 

0 

Even more discouraging is the disenchantment of small 
market investors generally. Purchases of movie industry 
securities within the past six months by these elements 
can only be surmised by study of volume transactions. 
They obviously have run abysmally low. It is becoming 
more and more difficult to find a continuous market in 
movie shares, reflecting, of course, a marked lack of inter- 
est by the general public. The danger is growing that 
unless moviedom awakens to the demands of its share- 
holders and creditors it will find its customary sources of 
capital flow as dried up as a west Texas water hole. 



Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 Page 7 



Wh9t They'te hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



THEATRES THE BIG MONEY. The recent snatchback 
by Associated Artists of "The Maltese Falcon" a week 
before it was scheduled to be shown on TV as part of the 
152-picture package of Warner films leased by Associated 
to WCBS-TV points up the fact that the big money for 
films still lies in theatrical exhibition. Associated had in- 
cluded the film in the $152,000 deal with the station but 
had wisely included a clause which permitted it to recall 
a limited number of the leased films and substitute others. 
A subsidiary of P.R.M., Inc., a corporation backed by 
Canadian investors, Associated decided at the 11th hour to 
hold out this valuable property in order to remake it for 
theatrical distribution. This last-minute display of good 
sense highlights the sickening dissipation of valuable 
properties in the wholesale allocation of films for TV con- 
sumption. The fact remains that exposure of a movie to 
the millions of TV's non-paying viewers completely blots 
out its worth for future production. "The Maltese Falcon" 
was one saved from this fate. How many other multi- 
million dollar grossing properties, however, will be tele- 
vised into obsoletion? 

O 

STUDIO EXEC ON BLOCK. Production head of one of 
the major film studios (his position has become increasing- 
ly nominal of late, anyhow), will probably be set adrift 
within the next six months. The caliber of the product 
from that company deteriorated sharply during '56 and he 
has had little success in tying up personalities who mean 
something at the boxoffice. Another factor giving impetus 
to talk about the exec's probable exodus is increased 
behind-the-scenes string-pulling by the front office to 
direct studio operations, making the studio man a chief in 
name only. 

0 

TITLES AND BOXOFFICE. A reawakened awareness 
of the age-old problem of tagging films with "titles that 
sell" is pervading motion picture ad-pub executives. Stimu- 
lated by Sindlinger studies correlating the importance of 
proper titles to the effective merchandising of pictures, 
celluloid marketing execs are taking a hard look at titles 
in an effort to make sure that the tag of a picture conveys 
a definite idea as to the story line and that it can be inte- 
grated into the over-all selling campaign. The latter factor, 
too often overlooked in tabbing a picture, is frequently be- 
hind what might otherwise be deemed inept titling, giving 
a peg to a campaign that can mean the difference. One of 
the leaders in this field is Bob Taplinger, Warners' adver- 
tising-p.r. chief, who is a red-hot advocate of title research. 
Recent WB changes include "The Sleeping Prince" to 



"The Prince and the Showgirl" and "Melville Goodwin, 
U.S.A." to "Top Secret Affair". Among pictures opinion 
research execs have tabbed as being weakened by poor 
titles: "Friendly Persuasion" and "Death of a Scoundrel" 
— which is being prefixed in the ads with the words "The 
Loves and . . ." outside the title quotes. 

0 

PRIME TV TIME FOR FEATURES. While none of 
the networks have yet succumbed to the apparent draw of 
feature films to a point where they will set aside the prime 
6 to 10 o'clock evening time for the big old ones on a regu- 
lar basis, the growing popularity of the better features, 
plus the huge influx into the TV market of major product 
in the past year, is hewing away at the nets' opposition. 
They're eyeing with no little uneasiness the huge upsurge 
in audience ratings where independents like KTTV in Los 
Angeles, with a 52-picture per year package from MGM, 
show a "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo" between 8 and 10, 
and sweep to a rating greater than the combined ratings of 
the three network affiliates for the same period. The nets 
realize that once the ace in the hole they have over the 
indes, live shows, is trumped by old Hollywood film offer- 
ings, they're going to have to scratch for ratings and spon- 
sors. And if it means getting the better pictures, even at a 
fancy figure, to hold their sponsors, odds are there'll be 
more feature films on prime time segments. Movie people 
are viewing the movement of the oldies into the big time 
with mixed emotions, even some film executives, who feel 
that they may have tossed too much film into their deals 
with TV. Exhibitors, too, evidence mingled reactions. 
There are those who feel that anything that keeps people 
at home is bad for their business ; others see a rosier side : 
the oldies, they believe, will give TViewers an appetite for 
the new pictures. Moreover, the better ones, having been 
seen by a large percentage of audiences, will free 'em for 
an evening of going out — to the movies. 

0 

GAMBLER TODD CASHES IN. They're ALL talking 
about Michael Todd's latest gamble that paid off — and 
handsomely — for the showman par excellence. Not only is 
"Around The World in 80 Days" doing capacity business 
around the country, but it has walked off with as many 
honors and kudos as there are stars in the lavish produc- 
tion — and that's a real bounty. Movie polls, critics polls, 
magazine polls all name "World" as one of the top films of 
the year, one of the best of all time. A good deal of the 
success can be attributed, of course, to Todd's astute sense 
of showmanship both in the casting and in the exploitation 
of the film. But of even greater importance is that he has 
returned the use of "entertainment" in the true sense of 
the word to the picture medium. There are no lugubrious 
morals drawn, no heavy mixtures of sex and sadism. Mike 
Todd has simply re-enshrined the god entertainment where 
it properly belongs — in the movies. 



Page 8 Film BULLETIN January 7. 1957 



^Baby Doll"— Picture & Principle 



by LEONARD COULTER 
There is no lack of adherents on both sides — those who 
tell you firmly that "Baby Doll" adds nothing to Holly- 
wood's lustre, and others who insist with equal fervor that 
it must be ranked with the very finest films ever produced 
in this country. But artistic merits aside, its appearance 
has raised a hullabaloo of excitement and controversy 
never before accorded a motion picture. 

It is not our desire, nor is it the point of this discussion, 
to judge if this film is a worthy subject to become a cause 
celebre in the annals of the motion picture industry. The 
issue we have at hand goes deeper than the question of 
whether this is a good or a poor film. The purpose here is 
to examine the storm that has been blown up around 
"Baby Doll", to ask why it was raised and how it may 
affect the movie industry. 

At the outset, let it be remembered that the picture was 
not released by Warner Bros, until it had passed the acid 
test, it had received a Production Code seal of approval. 

Occasionally, films fail to win the Code Seal because of 
their salacity, vulgarity, brutality, lewdness or other ob- 
jectionable characteristics. But on none of these counts 
had exception been taken to "Baby Doll". It was passed 
"fit for human consumption", as it were. 

Now, if the MPAA Code had been invented by some 
group of greedy, grasping businessmen willing to exploit 
filth on the screen for the sake of a "fast buck", it would 
not have been surprising to find the Church protesting that 
it offered the public inadequate moral protection. 

However, the Code under which the Motion Picture As- 
sociation has worked for many years, was written by, and 
ever since has been sustained by, a group of Catholic 
churchmen. That group has defended the Code against 
scores of attacks from independent producers who from 
time to time have rebelled against its restrictive clauses. 
Moreover, the incumbent Code Administrator, Mr. Geof- 
frey Shurlock, is himself a Catholic. 

"Baby Doll", a film which, as we have noted, received 
the Administrator's approval, has been subjected to the 
most intense and broad attack by the Catholic Church. It 
has been condemned by Francis Cardinal Spellman as 
"evil" and "immoral". He has forbidden Catholics to see it 
"under pain of sin". In view of the Catholic authorship of 
the MPAA Code it would appear that the Cardinal-Arch- 



bishop of New York's condemnation is tantamount, indeed, 
to a condemnation of the Motion Picture Association and 
its voluntary scheme of self-regulation and censorship. 

That is why the current controversy over "Baby Doll" 
has unusual significance, and why the film industry needs 
to ask itself a very serious question : is this the beginning 
of a new attempt by a certain section of the church in the 
United States to sabotage the existing Code of voluntary 
censorship and replace it with a more rigid set of rules 
based on a purely sectarian outlook and philosophy? 

What The Critics Thought 

Admittedly, "Baby Doll" depicts a sordid lot of people, 
deals with decadence and lust, and its principal characters 
are devoid of uplifting qualities or motives. All the critics 
made this point. 

Bill Zinsser, in the New York "Herald-Tribune" referred 
to its gusts of rage, twinges of passion and waves of 
jealousy. But he added, "It is often argued that stories of 
this kind should not be told on the screen. The question 
is one of taste and ethics, and opinions on the subject vary 
widely. Obviously, different moviegoers will read different 
meanings into 'Baby Doll'. Without attempting to judge 
the moral values of the film, this reviewer believes that the 
intent of the author and director was artistic, not porno- 
graphic." He calls it an "unusually good film". 

Alton Cook's verdict in the New York "World-Tele- 
gram" was that the picture "ranges through ferocity, mad- 
ly unrestrained comedy, leery teetering towards seduction 
and an infrequent touch of faint pity ... It is a striking 
achievement in acting, writing, and direction, presenting 
an unhappily doomed group for whom little compassion is 
expressed." 

And Archer Winsten's "New York Post" review re- 
ferred to the picture's demonstration "of Southern back- 
country degredation at its worst, or close to it." 

This cross-example of professional opinion indicates 
beyond doubt that "Baby Doll" is about as unedifying a 
film as has ever come out of Hollywood. Yet, despite all 
the criticism of the type of character it depicts, the film 
has been acclaimed by many highly competent critics as a 
work of art. 

And that brings us precisely to the real issue in the cur- 

C Continued un Page 13 J 



Rim BULLETIN January 7, 1957 Page ? 



"Three Violent People" 

ScuUeu 'Rati*? OOO 

Lively, if familiar, western well-produced in VistaVision and 
Technicolor. Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter head cast. 

Charlton Heston is rigged out in western duds and six- 
gun in this VistaVision-Technicolor outdoor melodrama 
produced by Hugh Brown for Paramount. He lends 
rugged masculinity to his role of a rancher, who hastily 
marries saloon dancer Anne Baxter and reacts violently 
upon learning about her shady past. Miss Baxter makes 
the gal first lurid then exceedingly repentant. Tom Tryon 
is his one-armed, black sheep brother. The screenplay by 
James E. Grant deals extensively with Miss Baxter, giving 
this more than usual western interest for the fern trade. In 
addition, "Three Violent People" has enough he-man 
antics (dealing with land-grabbing carpet-baggers) to keep 
outdoor fans happy. Direction by Rudolph Mate neatly 
blends words and deeds. Dance-hall girl Miss Baxter sets 
out to marry proud Texas rancher Heston, returning from 
the Civil War. She neglects to mention her past when they 
hastily marry, and she falls deeply in love with him after 
they return to his ranch. Tryon, Heston's brother, wishes 
to dispose of the land for quick cash offered by carpet- 
baggers Forrest Tucker and Bruce Bennett. Miss Baxter 
is recognized, and the gang makes certain Heston learns of 
his wife's past. Heston throws Miss Baxter out, learns she 
is with child, makes her return until after she gives birth. 
Tryon joins the gang, wants to shoot it out with Heston 
who refuses to draw. Bennett's gang arrives and Miss 
Baxter saves her husband's life during the gun battle. Con- 
vinced of her love, Heston takes her back. 

Paramount. 100 minutes. Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland, Tom 
Tryon. Produced by Hugh Brown. Directed by Rudolph Mate. 

"Gun for a Coward" 

^cuutete, batata Q Q Plus 
Sagebrush action drama about young man opposed to vio- 
lence. Well-balanced cast, color, CinemaScope plus factors. 

This William Alland production for U-I is blessed with 
Eastman color, CinemaScope and a well-balanced cast. 
Fred MacMurray stars as a hard-working rancher who 
raised his two brothers but neglected his girl, Janice Rule. 
Jeffrey Hunter is the lad taught to believe in reason rather 
than violence by his mother, Josephine Hutchinson. Dean 
Stockwell is the rowdy kid-brother. Director Abner Biber- 
man builds tension steadily in revealing the MacMurray- 
Hunter-Rule triangle. Hunter backs away from fights and 
is stamped as a coward. He and Miss Rule are in love, but 
they cannot bring themselves to tell MacMurray who has 
courted her. Finally, Hunter reveals his feelings during a 
cattle drive to Abilene. Rustlers stampede the herd while 
MacMurray's away. Hunter orders the men to retreat to a 
canyon where fighting chances are best. Hunter rides off 
without hearing his brother, Stockwell, tell the men to stay 
and fight, and when Stockwell is killed, Hunter is blamed. 
MacMurray attempts to take Hunter's part in a saloon 
gunfight, but the latter turns on him and they brawl. Mac- 
Murray, realizing his kid brother is a man, joins him and 
the cowhands in tracking the lost herd. 

Universal-International. 88 minutes. Fred MacMurray Jeffrey Hunter Janice Rule 
Chill Wills. Produced by William Alland. Directed by Abner Bibcrman. 



"The Wrong Man" 

%CC4utC44 O Q Plus 

Tense Hitchcock suspense meller. Highly realistic, but overly 
grim, treatment of mistaken-identity drama. 

"The Wrong Man", latest Alfred Hitchcock suspense 
melodrama, maintains an air of harrowing suspense and 
agitation all the way through. The famed producer-director 
tells the true-life story of a Stork Club musician who was 
mistakenly "positively" identified as a holdup man in 
straightforward, documentary style, recording it all in 
stark black and white exactly as it occurred at the very 
places it happenend. As a matter of fact, it is this very 
factuality that robs "The Wrong Man" of some of the pop- 
ular Hitchcock flavor and entertainment value. It lacks 
sufficient dramatization for general audiences. Henry 
Fonda is the distraught, bewildered victim, and Vera Miles 
plays his wife who blames herself for the misfortune and 
becomes a mental case. Their performances are of high 
caliber. Screenplay by Maxwell Anderson and Angus Mac- 
Phail moves somberly, unrelentingly, with austere econo- 
my of dialogue. The Hitchcock signature is ever present 
in the constant concern for revealing details. Bass fiddle 
player Fonda needs money for Miss Miles' dental work, 
and attempts to borrow against an insurance policy. A 
girl identifies him as the holdup man who previously 
robbed the company. He is booked, later released on bail. 
Fonda attempts to track witnesses to verify his where- 
abouts, discovers they have died. Miss Miles blames her- 
self for the circumstances, becomes emotionally depressed, 
is taken to a sanitarium. A mistrial delays things further, 
but the culprit who resembles Fonda is finally caught. 
Fonda is freed, his wife recovers, and they move to Florida. 

Warner Bros. 105 minutes. Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony Ouayle Harold J. 
Stone. Produced and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. 

"Man in the Vault" 

SuttHete RattKa Q Q 

Crime melodrama about youth led astray is mildly engross- 
ing. Absence of names will relegate it to lower-half billing. 

"Man in the Vault" (RKO) provides passable entertain- 
ment for undiscriminating patrons who thrive on action 
melodramas. Lacking any marquee names, it will serve 
best as a supporting dualler. The story is treated in routine 
manner by director Andrew V. McLaglen, who injects 
some suspense during the scene in which Campbell tests 
his keys in the deposit box and exits with the money. 
Karen Sharpe plays a poor-rich girl, Anita Ekberg appears 
briefly as a party girl, and Berry Kroeger is a stereotype 
hoodlum. Ballad entitled "Let the Chips Fall Where They 
May" brightens one scene. Burt Kennedy's screenplay has 
Kroeger planning to rob a safety deposit box. He offers 
Campbell $5000 to produce a duplicate key. At a party 
Campbell meets wealthy Miss Sharpe and falls in love with 
her. When Kroeger has him beaten up and threatens more 
of the same to the girl, Campbell goes through with the 
robbery. Miss Sharpe convinces him the $200,000 must be 
returned, but rival thief Paul Fix trails him. Kroeger and 
Fix cross paths and die in a gun battle. Campbell returns 
the money to police, and retains the love of Miss Sharpe. 

RKO. 73 minutes. William Campbell, Karen Sharpe, Anita Ekberg, Paul Fix. Pro- 
duccd by Robert E. Morrison. Directed by Andrew V. McLaglen. 



Page 10 Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 



"Full of Life" 

g<w<v«yj "Rating O O O Plus 

Should prove to be one of the year's big grossers. Judy 
Hoiliday sparkles in tender comedy about tribulations of 
pregnancy. Word-of-mouth should give this strong "legs". 

The magnetic personality of Judy Hoiliday pervades this 
rollicking comedy as she contends with the physical strains 
and emotional stresses of pregnancy. Miss Hoiliday starts 
the laughs rolling, literally, before the titles are off the 
screen, and keeps it up for 91 minutes in this Columbia re- 
lease. Masterfully produced by Fred Kohlmar and shrewd- 
ly directed by Richard Quine, the narrative of "Full of 
Life" is so lucid, the treatment so memorable, the events 
so vividly portrayed, that every woman — married or not — 
will drag her man to witness his uproarious chronicle of a 
blessed event. Exhibitors in all situations can count on 
high grosses, and word-of-mouth response is sure to pick 
up the momentum and keep it rolling down to the last run. 
Richard Conte plays the expectant father, a writer, with so 
much warmth and conviction that this must rank as the 
finest performance of his career. Salvatore Baccaloni, a 
middle-aged "new face", appears as the rotund Italian 
father-in-law who comes to repair a kitchen floor, and stays 
to question the couple's religious attitudes. Director Quine 
has a fine eye for the screwy details of pregnancy mani- 
fested in Miss Holliday's erratic appetite, continual back- 
aches, and passion for cleanliness. He developes a delight- 
ful wholesomeness and enthusiasm on the part of the sup- 
porting players toward the expectant mother. John Fante 
adapted the screenplay from his own novel with inherent 
wit and much "business". In addition, he has refrained 
from slanting the Catholicism to appease the church, but 
associates the idea of faith with Conte's need to pray when 
his wife is giving birth. When Conte's pregnant wife, Miss 
Hoiliday, falls through a termite-ridden kitchen floor, they 
visit his Italian folks, Baccaloni and Esther Minciotti, for 
papa's help in repairing it. Bricklayer Baccaloni returns 
home with the couple, is angered to learn his son bought a 
stucco house, and goes on a binge. He attempts to impose 
old world ways on Conte and asks basic religious questions 
of Miss Hoiliday, who's not Catholic. The couple is per- 
suaded to go through a church wedding ceremony. In 
wedding gown, Miss Hoiliday is rushed to the hospital 
with false labor pains. A baby boy is born, and Conte re- 
ceives $5000 for a story his father made him write. 



Judy Hoiliday, Richard Conte 
Directed by Richard Quine. 



"The Girl Can't Help It" 
Su4tHe44 Rati*? Q Q O 

Jayne Mansfield, Tom Ewell, Edmond O'Brien in comedy that 
mocks rock V roll. Sure to click with those who enjoy 
wacky satire and bellylaughs. 

Producer-director Frank Tashlin has concocted a rather 
funny satire on the American phenomenon called rock 'n' 
roll. This 20th Century-Fox offering starts on a high note 
of a ludicrous plot and soars into the most rarified tones of 



rock 'n' roll nonsense yet heard. In CinemaScope and De 
Luxe Color, it's also an eye-filling spoof. "The Girl Can't 
Help It" stars Tom (7-Year Itch) Ewell and Edmond 
O'Brien, and introduces Jayne Mansfield who wiggles, 
squeaks and meows eloquently. The musical segment is 
loaded with ten celebrated R&R performers, headed by 
vocalist Julie London and Ray Anthony's band. Teenagers 
will be left wide-eyed by the caliber of production and 
rivet-gun tempos; word-of-mouth should draw adults to 
see R&R torn to bits. Ewell is a hard-drinking agent 
haunted by a vision of Julie London. Henry Jones is 
hilarious as O'Brien's right-hand man. Screenplay by 
Tashlin and Herbert Baker, as sardonic as it is ridiculous, 
is one continuous laugh. Conductor Lionel Newman con- 
tributes euphonic sounds for a change of pace, highlighted 
by Miss London's rendition of "Cry Me a River". Ex- 
gangster O'Brien hires agent Ewell to make a singing star 
of his girl, Miss Mansfield, who prefers domestic life. Ewell 
makes the nightclub rounds with her and is offered con- 
tracts — on sight — before she performs. O'Brien gets An- 
thony to record his own R&R tune with Miss Mansfield 
contributing a shriek. Ewell and Miss Mansfield fall in 
love. The record clicks, O'Brien decides to take up R&R 
vocalizing, Ewell and Miss Mansfield run off to raise a 
family. 

ie Mansfield, Edmond O'Brien, 
ilin. 

"Slander" 

Highly exploitable melodrama about expose magazine is 
burdened with far-fetched plot. Pair marquee names. 

This Armand Deutsch production for M-G-M sets out to 
depict the devastating effects of an expose-scandal type 
magazine. Unfortunately, however, the plot is too far- 
fetched and fails to focus on the revolting situation, but 
depends on coincidental melodramatics for punch. Grosses 
generally will depend on the exhibitor's exploitation of the 
film's topical aspects. Van Johnson manages to create a 
warm, sympathetic portrayal as a TV performer who is 
victimized by an expose article about a felony he com- 
mitted long ago. Ann Blyth is the confused wife, and 
Steve Cochran the notorious publisher. Richard Eyer (of 
"Friendly Persuasion") plays Johnson's young so. The 
screenplay by novelist Jerome Weidman is awkwardly con- 
structed and sheds any pretense to plausibility when Coch- 
ran's mother shoots him dead. Roy Rowland directs in a 
manner that's stagey and often flat. Puppeteer Johnson 
clicks with a TV show for kids. Scandal magazine pub- 
lisher Cochran tells Johnson's wife, Miss Blyth, he wants 
some facts on a famous actress, threatening to publish a 
story about Johnson. (Johnson, raised in poverty, robbed 
and knifed a man when young, and served his sentence.) 
Johnson refuses to disgrace the actress, the article is pub- 
lished, and the sponsor drops his son. Their son, taunted 
by other kids, runs into a car, is killed. Johnson appears on 
TV to tell the nation his story. Marjorie Rambeau, Coch- 
ran's mother, sickened by his tactics, shoots him. 



Sulfite 'Rati*? G G G O TOPS © G O GOOD Q O AVERAGE G POOR 



[More REVIEWS on Page 12] 



"Thn Kinrj and Four Queens" 

Scc4i«c44 Rati*? O O O 

Western adventure with Clark Gable romancing four beau- 
ties. Has quick pace. Figures above aberage b.o. 

Clark Gable, for marquee value, plus four new and beau- 
tiful faces, for younger audiences, make up a winning box- 
office combination in this Russ-Field-Gabco production for 
United Artists release. Gable plays a smooth rogue who 
baits love-starved widows Eleanor Parker, Jean Willes, 
Barbara Nichols and Sara Shane. Jo Van Fleet is seen as 
their suspicious, gun-toting mother-in-law who guards the 
girls and a gold cashe, awaiting her surviving son's return. 
This pentagon situation evokes much humor. CinemaScope 
and DeLuxe color are effectively used by producer David 
Hempstead for the ghost-town setting. Raoul Walsh's di- 
rection sustains fairly good throughout as Gable, with his 
famous come-hither grin, entices the girls behind Miss Van 
Fleet's back. Grosses will be above-average in the general 
market because "The King and Four Queens" has Gable 
and a good share of popular entertainment ingredients. It 
will not do so well in class situations. Gable learns that 
Miss Van Fleet has hidden $100,000 in gold and keeps her 
four daughter's-in-law waiting for her single surviving 
outlaw son. Shot by Miss Van Fleet as he arrives, Gable 
is allowed to convalesce. The wives, having waited two 
years, are attracted to Gable. He learns none of them 
knows where the gold is hidden. Miss Parker, remote and 
cold toward Gable, arouses his interest and suspicion. Miss 
Van Fleet makes him leave, but not before he locates the 
gold. Miss Parker offers to share it with him and they de- 
part. The sheriff catches them, takes all the gold except 
$5000, Gable's reward. Latter rides off with Miss Parker. 

United Artists. I A Russ-Field-Gabco Production). 84 minutes. Clark Gable, Eleanor 
Parker, Jo Van Fleet. Produced by David Hempstead. Directed by Raoul Walsh. 

"Don't Knock the Rock" 

Bill Haley's Comets plus Alan Dale in lively rock V roller. 
Exclusively for youths who "dig" the solid beat. 

Producer Sam Katzman again brings together a wide 
variety of rock 'n' roll acts — with Bill Haley's combo and 
singer Alan Dale heading the bill — in an attempt to repeat 
the boxoffice bonanza he created with "Rock Around the 
Clock". Sixteen jumping, howling musical-dance numbers 
are laced around a synthetic plot in which Dale explores 
the appeals and aversions of the R&R fad. This Columbia 
release can count on lively boxoffice response where a pre- 
sold audiences of youngsters is pretty much established. 
Additional performing combos include The Treniers, Little 
Richard, and Dave Appell and his Applejacks. Director 
Fred F. Sears turns the spotlight on each performer briefly 
but often. Successful R&R singer Dale returns home for 
vacation and his told my mayor Pierre Watkin that his act 
is banned in town. He puts together a R&R show in the 
next town to prove that modern music will ruin nobody's 
morals. A fight breaks out and columnist Fay Baker de- 
livers the death blow in print. Dale stages a "cultural" 
affair, includes a dance from the Flapper Age, proves to 
parents they were as wild as their children. 

Columbia. (A Clover Production). 80 minutes. Bill Haley, Alan Dale, Alan 
Freed. Produced by Sam Katiman. Directed by Fred F. Sears. 



"Crime nf Passion" 

Lurid melodrama will attract fern audience. Barbara Stan- 
wyck as ruthless, scheming wife of cop. 

This melodrama stars Barbara Stanwyck as a ruthless, 
scheming wife who sets out to make her husband top man 
in the police department. It is buoyed up by the star's 
performance and an interlacing of sex, but on the whole 
it's familiar soap opera. The fern trade which takes to the 
Stanwyck brand of arch dialogue and passionate emoting 
will find "Crime of Passion" their dish; others will find it 
lacking in credulity and suspense. Background of the Los 
Angeles police department gives the film documentary-like 
quality at times. Supporting cast, including Sterling Hay- 
den, Raymond Burr and Virginia Grey, turn in competent 
performances. The lurid tale contains plenty of double 
entendre dialogue, bedroom scenes, passionate kisses and 
one seduction, all making this Herman Cohen production 
aimed right at the female audience. Black and white pho- 
tography is good. Miss Stanwyck is a successful reporter 
who falls in love with and marries police detective Sterling 
Hayden. They go to live in L.A. where she soon becomes 
bored with domestic duties and idle department gossip. 
She determines that her husband will get to the top in the 
department and frenzedly sets about to achieve this goal. 
She causes an accident just so she can meet the wife of the 
inspector, Raymond Burr, then starts false gossip to oust 
him from his job. She allows Burr to seduce her, then kills 
him when he fails to recommend that her husband get the 
inspector's job when he retires. Hayden books his wife. 

United Artists. 85 minutes. Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling Hayden, Raymond Burr. 
Virginia Grey, Fay Wray. Produced by Herman Cohen. Directed by Gerd Oswald. 

"Edge of the City" 

SutiKete TZaU*? O O Plus 

Absorbing, realistic drama set on New York docks. While 
lacking name values, boasts fine performances, mature story. 

"Edge of the City" is a first rate program picture with a 
waterfront setting. Produced by David Susskind for 
M-G-M, this suspenseful drama offers fine performances 
and mature story values. John Cassavetes stars as a thor- 
oughly confused Army deserter who has been pushed 
around and persecuted all his life. Sidney Poitier (who 
scored in "Blackboard Jungle") plays the Negro dock- 
woiker who dispels Cassavetes' fears and anxieties with his 
self-assured, worldly views. Jack Warden is the bigoted 
dock foreman who symbolizes the browbeating bully. 
Screenplay by Robert Alan Aurthur (from his TV play 
called "A Man Is Ten Feet Tall") builds characters that 
are very real and motivations that develop logically. Direc- 
tor Martin Ritt rightly relies on the emotional conflict to 
trigger the suspense. Cassavetes' fight with the irate fore- 
man becomes Poitier's fight against discrimination. When 
Poitier is stabbed to death by Warden's freight hook, Cas- 
savetes takes up the battle, fearlessly facing up to life for 
the first time. Cameraman Joseph Brun catches the rough 
atmosphere of the New York docks. Supporting player 
Kathleen Maguire is the school teacherish girl Cassavetes 
dates, and Ruby Dee is Poitier's wife. 

M-G-M. 85 minutes. John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier, Jack Warden. Produced by 
David Susskind. Directed by Martin Ritt. 



Page 12 Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 



BABY DULL"- PICTURE S. PHINCIPLL 



(Continued jrum Page 9) 

rent controversy. The essence of it is simply the right of 
the motion picture industry to pursue its artistic endeavors 
without undue pressures that are not applied to other art 
forms. 

Are We To Be Hoodwinked? 

Movies must grow up or die. They will never carry a 
worthwhile message, or do a fraction of the good they are 
capable of doing, if they pander to a low mental denomi- 
nator or to juvenile minds. Are books, and magazines, and 
the legitimate theatre to have freedoms denied the film 
producer? Are we always, on the screen, to see life through 
rose-colored spectacles? Are we to be hoodwinked into 
believing there is nothing unkind, unpleasant, difficult, in- 
decent or indecorous in life — or made, sheeplike, to accept 
the screen as a never-never-land of good intent instead of 
a graphic portrayal of all the things which surround us on 
this earth — good and bad alike? 

Such an attitude is implicit in Cardinal Spellman's 
blistering blast against "Baby Doll", delivered from the 
pulpit of St. Patrick's Cathedral before he had ever seen 
the picture — if, indeed, he has seen it since, which is im- 
probable. Said he, "The revolting theme of this picture and 
the brazen advertising promoting it, constitute a con- 
temptuous defiance of the natural law, the observance of 
which has been the source of strength in our national life. 
It is astonishing and deplorable that such an immoral mo- 
tion picture has received a certificate of approval . . .". 

Pegler to the Rescue 

Let it not be thought that the Cardinal Archbishop's 
powerful cry was alone in the wilderness. He quickly 
found supporters for his viewpoint, among them the in- 
trepid Westbrook Pegler who can always be counted on to 
squeeze the vitriol from his typewriter. 

Mr. Pegler gave Cardinal Spellman his full moral back- 
ing in an article referring to Elia Kazan, "Baby Doll's" 
brilliant director. He wrote: "Elia Kazan was a commu- 
nist who published an abject recantation a few years ago. 
His sincerity was doubted at the time, and may still be 
doubted by persons who accept the verdict of Cardinal 
Spellman . . ." And, as if he had not already gone far 
enough afield, Pegler, in his inimitable witch-hunt style, 
drags this in : "There are few major productions of the 
screen and the Broadway stage which do not return a 
profit to the Reds . . ." 

On the other side of the fence, the Rev. John A. Burke, 
director of Britain's Roman Catholic Film Institute, could 
"see no reason why adult Catholics should not see" the pic- 
ture. Father Burke expressed the opinion that "Baby Doll" 
is a "brilliant piece of work on a decadent subject", but de- 
clared that he would not recommend it for "thoughtless 
people". 

The Very Reverend James A. Pike, dean of the Protes- 
tant Cathedral of St. John the Divine, upon viewing the 
film with his wife, made this comment: "It takes a good 
deal of subtlety to grasp the significance of the plot, and 
thus the picture is definitely unsuitable for any but adult 
minds." 



In a subsequent sermon from his pulpit. Dean Pike ex- 
pressed several pertinent views. Neither he nor Mrs. Pike 
found "Baby Doll" pornographic. He denied, as Cardinal 
Spellman had implied, that "patriotism" was an issue in the 
controversy. "The true patriot,*' Dean Pike stated, "de- 
fends freedom against governmental authority and against 
majority or minority pressure groups, against volunteers 
in the cause of thought control." 

Speaking specifically about the movie, he told his con- 
gregation: "It would take a fairly subtle and independent 
mind to interpret this picture aright. Maybe many adults 
are ill-equipped to see the picture. But it is one of the 
privileges of adulthood in a free country to expose oneself 
to picturizations of life and make one's own interpretations. 
The task of the church is not to spare adults this experi- 
ence, but rather to provide them with the right canons of 
interpretation and to furnish them with answers in depth 
to questions asked in depth." 

And Max Lerner 

Max Lerner, of the New York "Post", had this to say: 
"I v/ant to report that 'Baby Doll' is no picture to which I 
would delight in bringing my children, but it is very much 
a picture for people who have some emotional maturity, 
and who care about the American movie craft. 

"Cardinal Spellman's ill-considered attack on it may 
have helped it to get audiences, but it has distorted the 
perspective in which the picture is best seen. I find the 
question of whether it is 'immoral' a futile one. If it is im- 
moral to portray on the screen a tangled skein of fear, in- 
security, sex, revenge, compassion, frustration and love, 
then call 'Baby Doll' immoral — but then you had better 
shut up shop in Hollywood, leaving the movies to the 
Italians and Japanese to produce . . . 

"The American movies are probably the greatest of the 
popular arts that our culture has produced. It is the art of 
Chaplain, and Garbo, and Disney, and of writers and direc- 
tors who have done something different from what the 
Elizabethans or Victorians did. We can keep this tradition 
alive or we can let it be snuffed out — cooped up, as if we 
were children, in a baby doll-house where we are given the 
right pap to eat and the right instruction for what to see 
and think." 

There you have the very guts of this issue insofar as the 
motion picture industry is concerned. 

Through all of this seething discussion the boxoffice is 
ticking merrily away, much to the satisfaction of Warner 
Brothers and considerably to the chagrin of the film's 
critics. While it might be construed by some that the pub- 
lic response to "Baby Doll" provides the ultimate answer 
to those who condemn it, we cannot accept this thesis 
alone. Far more important than the boxoffice success of 
Mr. Kazan's film, we believe, will be the final outcome of 
the struggle between all the creative kazans of our indus- 
try and those who would restrict the scope of the motion 
picture to rigid standards drawn to meet some vague 
common audience denominator. If the industry, hard 
pressed enough by competitive problems, relents the least 
bit in its opposition to outside interference of the kind we 
are now witnessing, it may very well sacrifice its last 
vestige of freedom as an art — without which it will not 
survive. 



Film BULLETIN January 7, 1757 Page 13 



EXHIBITORS fORUfTl 



S One of the most useful exhibitor organization bulletins ever to reach our desk 
was thai from the Independent Theatre On ners of Ohio dated December 31. It 
contained the following detailed report by II alter Kessler. manager of Loeiv's 
Ohio Theatre in Columbus, on the control of vandalism and misbehavior by ju- 
veniles and adolescents in that theatre. II ritten at the request of Hob II He. e.xecu- 

^ lire secretary of the ITO of Ohio, this is important reading for every exhibitor. 



HOW WE PREVENT 
DELINQUENCY 
IN THE THEATRE 

There are two distinctly different phases 
in our efforts for the curtailing of juvenile 
delinquency and malicious mischief in our 
theatre. The first phase of Operation Ju- 
venile includes constant surveillance of our 
audience by our staff. Our ushers are posted 
in the auditorium with instructions to walk 
up and down their aisles every ten to fifteen 
minutes whether called upon to do so in the 
seating of a patron or not. They are also 
told to pay close attention to individuals or 
groups cf potential troublemakers. We have 
often found that youngsters aware of the 
fact that they are being watched will not at- 
tempt mischief and will also remain seated 
quietly through a performance rather than 
give trouble and be expelled from the thea- 
tre. In addition to our regular house staff 
being ever watchful for mischief, on Satur- 
day nights when we deal with a particular 
element which can give trouble, we have on 
duty a uniformed county sheriff complete 
with Sam Browne belt, pistol, etc. This 
sheriff's duty is not to be on hand in case of 
trouble but rather by his presence, prevent 
trouble from starting. He maintains his post 
within the vicinity of the doorman so that he 
can be readily observed by patrons entering 
the theatre. He makes periodical checks of 
the main floor and balcony area in an obvious 
manner being certain that he can be ob- 
served by any troublesome element. In 
checking the balcony, he patrols the runway 
between each section in an ostentatious 
manner which calls attention to the fact that 
he is ready to step in and quell any disturb- 
ance or ungentlemanly-like conduct on the 
part of our patrons. We have found that his 
blatant presence has had a quieting effect 
upon the noisy element, who when entering 
the theatre and observing our sheriff have 
decided against any further carrying on. 
Should a group that looks troublesome go 
up into the balcony, the sheriff will possibly 
follow along behind them so that they are 
aware of the fact that he knows their seat 
locations and can readily find them should 
there be a disturbance. 

On Sunday afternoon our problem is of a 
different sort with a slightly younger ele- 
ment. We therefore hired a county sheriff, 
a member of the Urban League who reports 
for duty in complete uniform. An imposing 
6' 4" figure of a man, he has been able to deal 
with our potential delinquents in a manner 
that removes all possible criticism from us. 
He too, follows the concept of our theory in 
making himself noticeable to all who enter 
the theatre and on his patrols around the 
auditorium. 



THE WORD SPREADS 

The word circulates rapidly among young- 
sters and teenagers, and the fact that the 
Ohio Theatre is ready in the event of a dis- 
turbance is almost a known fact in all quar- 
ters of the city, with the result that we have 
had very few troublesome incidents within 
the last two or three years. 

We have not had one serious case within 
the last three years. The effect of our watch- 
fulness on weekends carries over throughout 
the week, since at that time our regular staff 
continues its vigilance. Upon the first sign 
of a disturbance, an usher will caution the 
disturbers and ask that they behave. Should 
he feel that his warning will not be heeded 
or another disturbance occurs, he has been 
instructed to summon a member of the man- 
agement staff immediately. The manager or 
assistant then visits the location of the dis- 
turbance and copes with it, by either con- 
vincing the troublemakers that they will 
either have to behave or be expelled. Or, if 
results look improbable, they are asked to 
leave and their money is refunded provided 
they have not seen more than half of the 
show. So well has our message reached the 
groups which cause trouble that months go 
by without even a slightly unpleasant or 
annoying incident cropping up. 

The second phase of our program for 
handling troublesome groups is what we 
term "the parent annoyance theory". From 
time to time we have experienced such 
things as one boy buying a ticket and open- 
ing the exit door for his friends or perhaps 
a boy or several boys coming in an exit door 
which had been left ajar by someone who 
exited the theatre in that manner. Or, we 
may have apprehended a troublemaker that 
we think deserves our attention. In these 
cases we have found that the culprit has ab- 
solutely no fear of the police department, 
nor of any message that we ourselves, have 
for them. 

THEY DON'T LIKE IT! 

We have found, however, that there is one 
thing that is extremely distasteful to them 
and that is the system of notifying their 
parents of their misconduct. For example, 
we apprehend two boys coming in an exit 
door. They are brought to the manager's 
office. We ask them their names, addresses 
and telephone numbers. We call their 
parents and tell them that we have appre- 
hended their sons in an act of lawlessness 
and that we can and will send them to the 
detention home and the juvenile court; but 
however, we are not interested in making 
further delinquents of the boys and we 
would much rather the parent knew of their 
misconduct. We suggest that the parent 



come to the theatre for the boys rather than 
have us turn them over to the police. In 
most cases the parent says he will be right 
down and makes every effort to beat the 
police to the theatre. We have seen a parent 
close his gas station to prevent his boy from 
being turned over to the police. We have 
taken a mother away from a bowling tour- 
nament in her effort to prevent her boy from 
being turned over to the police and we have 
taken swingshift workers out of bed in the 
middle of their sleeping time. Almost with- 
out exception, the parent upon arriving at 
the theatre handles his boy in such a manner 
as to almost assure us that there would be 
no recurrence from these particular boys. 
The word traveled fast, "if you get into 
trouble at the Ohio Theatre they don't call 
the police, they call your parents." It is ad- 
mitted that the major portion of the parents 
who come to the theatre are more concerned 
with the inconvenience caused them than 
they are with the wrong the boy has done. 
In the case of the woman who came away 
from her bowling tournament, she came into 
the manager's office and without a word pro- 
ceeded to slap her boy about the face and 
head in a manner that gave us concern. All 
the time, saying "Just because you don't 
know how to behave yourself and stay out 
of trouble, I had to leave my bowling in 
the middle of the tournament," then turning 
to me and saying, "Thank you very much for 
calling me. I appreciate your not turning 
him over to the police. You can be sure he 
won't give you any more trouble." Looking 
at the boy and the fear in his eye, I had an 
idea she was right. 

FROM A PRIVATE SCHOOL 

On one occasion we apprehended six girls, 
all students of a very fine private school. 
One had bought a ticket and the other five 
came in through the exit door which she 
opened for them. When the parents of these 
girls came to the theatre, there was more 
gnashing of teeth. The parents were extreme- 
ly grateful for our having called this miscon- 
duct to their attention and upon questioning 
the girls, discovered that once or twice they 
had done similar things but had never been 
caught. The parents felt that being advised 
of this incident would be of great assistance 
in handling their children. For the next 
three months these girls attended the theatre 
regularly and made it their business, by 
parent instructions, to seek me out, greet me 
and prove that they were acting like the 
ladies they really were and had learned that 
a misdeed, no matter how small, was still 
wrong. 

Several years ago it was no uncommon to 
have one or two incidents as mentioned 
above each week. However, it has been so 
long since we have had a major incident in 
our theatre, that we feel that our two-phase 
method has been successful and shown 
results. 

By Walter Kessler, 

Manager Locw's Ohio Theatre \ 

Col urn hits. Ohio 



Page 14 Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




SCHLANGER 

TED SCHLANGER, Stanley Warner 
Philadelphia zone manager, has taken a 
two-pronged approach to the problem of 
eliminating what he terms the "insidious" 
state law which permits small towns to 
levy taxes on local amusements. Schlang- 
er has divided his campaign into two 
parts: working directly with those able 
to have the law repealed on a state-wide 
basis, and working locally in communities 
where a local tax is in effect. For the 
latter, Schlanger is taking his cue from a 
successful campaign waged in Ambler, 
Pa., by Stanley Warner district manager 
Jack Flynn. Flynn's earlier vigorous ac- 
tivity in community affairs and charities 
paid off, earned him the support of the 
townspeople and the local newspaper. 
Schlanger suggests that managers in 
other towns form committees of promi- 
nent persons to make direct appeals to 
city councils and other governing bodies, 
pointing up the value of the theatre to 
the community, and the danger of con- 
fiscatory taxation. 



Ed Sullivan confers with William .1 . 
Ueineman, right, national co-chairman of the 
m: Brotherhood Drive, and Dr. Everett It. 
Clin, In. president of the Vational Conference 
•<l Christinas ,u„l Jews prior in making a 
filmed appeal to be shown throughout the 
eouniry during Brotherhood II eelc, Feb. 17-24. 
The amusement industry's participation in the 
annual inter-faith effort will be officially 
launched Jan. 24 at the ff'aldorf. 



J. MEYER SCHINE, three associates, 
the late Louis W. Schine, and nine Schine 
affiliate and subsidiary corporations, were 
found guilty of criminal contempt in vio- 
lating a 1949 Federal court order to divest 
themselves of certain of their theatres. 
Decision was handed down by Federal 
Judge Harold P. Burke, ifTThe U.S. dis- 
trict court of Buffalo. Case was brought 
by the Department of Justice and tried in 
1954-55 before Federal Judge John Knight 
who died without reaching a decision. 
Defendants were found guilty of using 
affiliated and subsidiary corporations to 
circumvent the 1949 order to sell 39 pic- 
ture theatres. Judge Burke stated that 
the Schines continued their "illegal plan 
and scheme" from 1949 to 1954 to retain 
the Schine monopolies and to prevent 
other exhibitors from competing with 
them. Sentencing was deferred. Defense 
counsel Frank G. Raichle has petitioned 
for a new trial. 

0 

BENJAMIN N. BERGER will retire as 
president of North Central Allied at the 
organization's April 1 convention. The 
veteran Minneapolis independent circuit 
owner, a key figure in Nat'l Allied since 
its infancy, has held his post altogether 
eleven years which he says is "long 
enough". In announcing his retirement, 
the exhibitor leader said he thought it was 
time for a younger man to take over, ex- 
pressed his "great satisfaction in the office 
for I have seen many of the things for 
which I fought become realities". Berger 
has called a meeting of the NCA board of 
directors for Jan. 8. It is expected a suc- 
cessor will be recommended for the top 
spot by an NCA committee. Most likely 
heir apparent is Stanley Kane. 

0 

JACK L. WARNER will receive the 
1957 Brotherhood Award of the National 
Conference of Christians and Jews. Wil- 
liam J. Heineman and Spyros S. Skouras, 
Jr., national co-chairmen of the amuse- 
ment industry's Brotherhood Drive, made 
the announcement. Award, in recognition 
of his contributions to better understand- 
ing among Americans of all faiths, will be 
made to the Warner president at the 12th 
annual Brotherhood dinner Jan. 24 at the 
Waldorf-Astoria. 

<0 

ALBERT MARGOLIES will terminate 
his association with Buena Vista Film 
Distribution Co. as director of advertis- 
ing, publicity and exploitation Jan. 31. Ac- 
cording to BV president Leo F. Samuels, 
the parting "is on the friendliest terms". 
Prior to joining the Disney subsidiary in 
1955, Margolies headed his own public 
relations firm. 

0 

FRANK PACE, JR., & GEORGE L. 
KILLION were elected to the board of 
directors of Loew's, Inc., filling the va- 
cancies left by the resignations of Nicho- 
las Schenck and Richard Crooks. Pace, 
former Secretary of the Army, is execu- 
tive vice president of General Dynamics 
Corp.; Killion is president of the Ameri- 
can President Lines. 



HEADLINERS... 



PAUL N. LAZARUS, JR., Columbia 
vice president, conferring at the West 
Coast studio . . . TOA president ERNEST 
G. STELLINGS revealed an addition to 
the monthly Bulletin to contain extensive 
information on all available foreign and 
independent product; section will be 
supervised by WALTER READE, JR., 
MYRON N. BLANK and others . . . Uni- 
versal vice president DAVID A. LIP- 
TON launched the company's 18-week 
"Seventh Annual Charles J. Feldman 
Sales Drive" together with companys 45th 
anniversary celebration Dec. 30. Sixteen 
stars will visit more than 50 cities in the 
next two months on its behalf, according 
to Lipton . . . New England's Jimmy Fund 
Hospital for cancer research in children 
was $512,215 richer as the result of the 



George Stevens, 
producer - director 
of "Giant", re- 
ceives Parents Mag- 
azine Award for 
the Warner Bros, 
production. 



recent drive . . . Paramount v. p. JEROME 
PICKMAN celebrating birth of daughter, 
PATRICIA FLO on Dec. 23 . . . MPA 
president ERIC JOHNSTON appointed 
a special committee for aid to Hungarian 
film people newly arrived in this country. 
Committee consists of MAURICE BERG- 
MAN of Universal, BORIS KAPLAN of 
Paramount and HARRY ROME of Co- 
lumbia . . . New Jersey senator CLIF- 
FORD P. CASE principal speaker at the 
Jan. 7 testimonial dinner honoring MAX- 
WELL GILLIS, retiring chief Barker of 
Philadelphia Variety Tent 13. SYLVAN 
M. COHEN is new topper. 

O 

CHARLES COHEN was appointed 
home office publicity manager for Warner 
Brothers, succeeding Charles S. Steinberg 
who is joining CBS. Announcement was 
made by WB vice president Robert S. 
Taplinger. Cohen, formerly assistant 
Eastern publicity and advertising director 
for Allied Artists, will assist Warner na- 
tional publicity manager Mike Hutner. 







Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 Page 15 



7>V6at t&e S&owww /tie 'Doiaat 

MERCHANDISING 4 EXPLOITATION DEPARTMENT f 



/ 



RHODEN URGES EXHIBITION TO TALK & ACT UPBEAT *m 

and brotherhood thai thunders forth (rem 

TO REGAIN ITS POPULARITY WITH THE PUBLIC 



"Keep the beat up" was the urgent plea 
delivered by National Theatres' Elmer C. 
Rhoden in a TOA Business Builders' cover 
message to theatremen. 

"If our business is going to regain its pop- 
ularity with the public, we have to first re- 
gain our faith in it. We must talk upbeat," 
the veteran exhibitor leader exhorted all ex- 
hibition. Rhoden's words were particularly 
directed at the gloom mongers, both within 
and outside of the industry who have played 
up theatre closings and beaten their breasts 
about the quality of the Hollywood product. 

Actually, Rhoden pointed out, "Pictures 
are better — and this is not just an idle state- 
ment." He couldn't recall a period, he said, 



when there had been "so many big im- 
portant pictures" as in this past year. 

Accenting the positive, Rhoden called for 
"the proper type of publicity" to trade jour- 
nals, financial columnists and other news and 
opinion circulators. "Instead of having pub- 
licity about theatres closing, let us have pub- 
licity about theatres being remodeled, re- 
furnished, and reopened. Let us have all of 
our stories carry an UPBEAT!", he said. 

The National Theatres president has con- 
tinually championed the cause of enthusiasm 
and its contagion within the industry, has 
been instrumental in helping spark b.o. Turn- 
ing to the scarcity of product, Rhoden en- 
visioned that the demand by exhibition for 
more good motion pictures will be met. 




'Commandments' Theme Used 
By Buffalo Retailer in Yule Ad 

Published "in the spirit of public service" 
by a Buffalo department store, a special 
Yuletide full page ad awarded a nifty pat- 
on-the-back to Cecil B. DeMille's production 
of "The Ten Commandments". The ad, 
which appeared in the Sunday Courier-Ex- 
press and the Evening News, was placed by 
Sattler's department store. 

Interrupting its usual advertising of Xmas 
merchandise, the aggressive retailer con- 
fronted upstate New Yorkers with the dy- 
namic institutional ad in an appeal to their 
humanitarianism. Urging readers to give to 
the Red Cross, the United Nations' Inter- 
national Children's Fund and to CARE, the 
advertisement stated: "Moved by the inspir- 
ing message of freedom and brotherhood 
that thunders forth from Cecil B. DeMille's 
monumental production, 'The Ten Com- 
mandments,' Sattler's offers this humble re- 
minder that, like the revered and heroic 
central Figure of this mighty drama, We 
may all Strike Our Own Blows for Humani- 
ty, Freedom and Lasting Peace . . . Sattler's 
is proud to join Buffalo's Religious Leader?' 
— Catholic, Protestant and Jewish — whq 
urge those of every creed to see 'The Ten 
Commandments." 




4 Warner Brothers has set an 
attention-grabbing deal with 
the National Safety Council 
in connection with the latest 
Hitchcock thriller, "The 
Wrong Man" featuring a 
cover-the-country poster dis- 
play for the cause of traffic 
safety. Big placard will con- 
trast proper auto driving 
rules for "the right man" 
and "the wrong man". Over 
1700 J. C. Penney variety 
stores throughout the nation 
will spotlight the signs as 
part of the National Safety 
Council's accident prevention 
drive. In addition, local and 
regional offices of the safety 
organization will distribute 
the poster to thousands of 
schools, stores and com- 
panies. The suspense drama 
is now in its debut engage- 
ment at New York City's 
Paramount Theatre. 



This presentation is in support of THf NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL'S ACCIDENT. PREVENTION PROGRAM 
Page 16 Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 



/ 




4 Shades of the Old 
West on Times Square. 
Cowpokes and cowgirls 
man a gift-laden stage- 
coach in Manhattan's 
wide open spaces to 
keep the Xmas spirit 
blazing by passing out 
gifts as part of a city- 
wide co-op promotion 
supporting the opening 
of United Artists' "The 
King and Four Queens" 
at the Mayfair Theatre. 
Campaign linked book, 
fashion tie-ins to par- 
ticipating retail outlets. 



Sell Music to Sell Movie, 
Schine Urges on 'Anastasia' 

A timely reminder that title tunes, backed 
by strong tie-in possibilities, can help shove 
a picture into the higher boxoffice brackets 
is interjected by Schine Chain's publiciteers 
in a bulletin to its managers. Naming such 
pictures as "The High and the Mighty", 
"High Noon" ("Love Is a Many-Splendored 
Thing" is an ideal case in point, too), as ex- 
amples of films sold to the public in many 
situations largely on the strength of the 
music, the circuit boxofficers earmark the 
title song of 20th-Fox' "Anastasia" for popu- 
larity, urge their managers to contact local 
radio stations, music stores, record shops 
and juke box dealers in an effort to garner 
"saturation playing time" for the tune which 
has already been recorded by seven artists. 

Among those that have pressed the disc 
are: Pat Boone (Dot), Roger Williams 
(Kapp), LeRoy Holmes (MGM), Guy Lom- 
bardo (Capitol), George Kates (Coral) and 
Victor Young (Decca). 




Warners Sets Contest to 
Find 'Miss Spirit of St. Louis' 

Warner Bros, is going to crown some 
lucky (and beautiful) airline stewardess 
"Miss Spirit of St. Louis" as part of a con- 
test promotion to beat the drum for the film, 
"The Spirit of St. Louis". To be held in 
May, at festivities coinciding with the inter- 
national world premiere of the film in New 
York City, the finals will be staged in con- 
junction with the Airline Stewards and 
Stewardesses Ass'n contest for the Ideal Air- 
line Stewardess thus giving the winner and 
the picture a crateful of publicity. 

Loot going to the winner includes a '57 
convertible and a WB screen test. Contest, 
which kicked off January 1, is open to over 
12,000 stewardesses on the more than thirty- 
five domestic and overseas airlines serving 
the United States. 

Unique 'Public Pigeon' Debut 
Held in New York State Prison 

What shapes up as probably the most off- 
beat world premiere ever held took place 
recently before 3,000 inmates of the Green- 
haven Prison in Stormville, New York. The 
picture: RKO's "Public Pigeon No. 1". 
Prison officials authorized the premiere at 
Greenhaven of the Red Skelton starrer when 
a poll of prisoners showed that the old red- 
head was the convicts' favorite funnyman. 

There were two showings of the Techni- 
color comedy in the prison theatre for half 
the inmates each time. 

Story was worth big break in the news- 
papers for its unique quality; not much was 
expected, however, from word-of-mouth 
buildup on this premiere. 

4 Gil Golden, Warner Bros, national ad man- 
ager, planed south to give special personal at- 
tention to the important Miami engagement of 
Elia Kazan's "Baby Doll". Golden visited eight 
radio shows, several television programs to help 
promote the WB release. One of the d.j.'s 
visited by Golden (left) was Jim Harper, popu- 
lar Miami platter spinner. 



Mammoth 'Pride and Passion' 
Co-op Aimed at Women's Market 

The lush women's market is the target for 
a co-op campaign that looms as the most 
extensive fashion drive ever undertaken by 
United Artists. The giant-size promotion 
will unload $341,000 into a hard-hitting box- 
office push for Stanley Kramer's "The Pride 
and the Passion". Over 1,000 retail outlets 
throughout the nation will participate in the 
promotion with UA, Rhea Dresses and 
Lowenstein Fabrics. 

Keyed to a new, chic line of women's 
styles inspired by the location filming of the 
epic in Spain, the campaign will be sup- 
ported by 550 pages of newspaper ads plus 
national magazine advertisements. 

Featuring Rhea's "Pride and Passion" 
sportswear and dresses using Lowenstein 
fabrics, the tie-in will be highlighted at 
glamorous fashion shows in 24 key market 
areas. A two-week all-free vacation to sunny 
Spain will be offered to the retailer running 
the best promotion in an effort to hypo local- 
level exploitation. 

Joining together to bring home the pro- 
motional bacon will be UA exploitation men 
and Rhea's field staff. The two organizations 
will cooperate to link the fashion promotion 
to local playdates of the VistaVision film, 
which stars Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and 
Sophia Loren. Posters, streamers and counter 
cards will be used to bally the campaign. 

Geared for long-range penetration in all 
media, the campaign will include star ap- 
pearances synchronized with local theatre 
openings and "P and P" fashion shows. TV 
films and recorded interviews will be sup- 
plied to exhibitors and dress dealers to help 
hypo the promotion. 

♦ What would be more natural to bally 
"Zarak" than a maiden in a harem costume. But 
those wintry blasts are pretty cold come Decem- 
ber in NYC so Columbia exploiteers came up 
with a plexiglass showcase complete with a 
heater to protect the haremlovely. Stunt was 
part of drumbeating campaign for the Warwick 
production when it opened at the Globe Theatre. 




Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 



Page 17 



EXPLOITATION PICTURE 

Boxoffice "Written" On the Lips of the Ladies 




heir 

vate lives 
o public view! 

fatten 
mtke 

VlND 



ROCK IAUREN ROBERT DOROTHY 

HUDSON • BACALL- STACK- MALONE 

— Robert Keith • Grant Williams • Harry Shannon 
Directs by DOUGLAS SIRK tanm by GEORGE ZUCKERMAN P™^™d b, ALBERT ZUGSMITH 

Ads are aimed squarely at the woman's market with special emphasis on the four star characteri- 
zations. Ad above concentrates on thumbnail teaser descriptions of the principals. A similar 
group of four character shouts is available for door panels and in newspaper teaser style. 




Analyses of what makes a boxoffice movie 
down through the years have reconfirmed 
the "woman's appeal" factor as one of the 
most potent in the magic formula. In 
"Written On the Wind", Universal-Interna- 
tional has the female of the moviegoing 
species firmly in its grasp, and, at the same 
time, latches on to enough talking points for 
the males to insure the minimum of reluc- 
tance by the escort. 

The selling points abound: The story is 
the kind of emotional meat that wraps it- 
self around a woman's heart; the characters 
just cry for savory thumbnail descriptions 
(see ad right) to pique the ladies' — and the 
men's— interest; the stars tote a magnetic 
lure in the person of Rock Hudson, Lauren 
Bacall, while Robert Stack and Dorothy Ma- 
lone, if less marquee-potent before, will be- 
come top names after the talk about their 
performances gets around. 

There is a flavor of the memorable "Kings 
Row" about this Technicolor melodrama. 
Frustrated love, twisted lives and offbeat 
characterizations are intermingled much as 
in that earlier boxoffice success that over- 
came a critical lashing to become a top popu- 
lar grosser. The excellent prospects for talk- 
about in "Written on the Wind" should be 
capitalized to their hefty potential. This 
means getting them in early in the run to 
get the snowballing word-of-mouth and Uni- 
versal has engendered an excellent advance 
campaign toward this end. 

National ads similar to that shown on this 
page have appeared in 19 publications 
especially chosen to reach the maximum 
woman's market. Such top-reader mags as 
Life, Look, McCalls, Redbook, Cosmopoli- 
tan, True Confessions, as well as the Sun- 
day Supplements, have blanketed the coun- 
try. A special national TV campaign of 
U-I's own spots has been underway since 
October in 35 major TV markets, plus a 
solid two-month pre-sell on "Strike It Rich" 
both on radio and video to blast away at 
some 20 million listeners and viewers daily. 

Screenings for such talk-breeders as 
beauty-parlor operators, salespeople, wom- 
en's groups, and other factions that show- 
man's experience has found to be prolific 
with words, will be an important factor in 
the know-about campaign. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND # 

Wi/lsoon be on every bodys Lips 

TEASER 2K 

Another theme of the ad campaign is use of the 
initials to scare up the eye-catching WOW! as 
shown in the teaser here. 



A strong assist comes from the theme song 
with lyrics by Oscar winner Sammy Cahn 
and melody by famed composer-conductor 
Victor Young. As sung by the Four Aces on 
Decca, it has become one of the top popular 
discs and is being backed by Decca with 
high-powered promotional material. An at- 
tractive album cover especially designed for 
Decca's release of the LP of the film's score 
pictures a dramatic clinch by Hudson and 



Bacall, should prove a sock window display 
item in music and record shops. 

Universal has come up with a special series 
of three one-minute teaser trailers, all in 
Technicolor, to afford a sock trailer on-the- 
spot advance campaign. Combined with the 
regular trailer, this is good for a solid 
month-long trailer campaign. All are avail- 
able from National Screen Service at no 
charge to the exhibitor. 



WRITTEN DN THE WIND O O 

Robert Wilder's novel of four people caught up in a maelstrom of erotic 
and violent emotions emerges on the screen in a Technicolor production by 
Albert Zugsmith that should set tongues wagging, both as to presentation and 
characterization. Under the direction of Douglas Sirk, the story (ostensibly 
based on a factual tale of a noted female's marriage to a wealthy alcoholic) 
follows the whirlwind romance of a wealthy playboy (Robert Stack) with aq 
executive secretary (Lauren Bacall) in his oil empire, their marriage which 
takes him away temporarily from his addiction to the bottle, and the fatefu 
cross-currents of romance involving his best friend (Rock Hudson) and hid 
sister (Dorothy Malone). Hudson's heart is set on Bacall, although his innate 
decency keeps him from revealing it ; Malone's madness for men is concern 
trated on Hudson. The crisis revolves around the deceptive seed implanted b)j 
Malone in her brother that Hudson is to be the father of Bacall's forthcoming 
baby, leading to a wild drunken spree and murder. Of particular note arl 
Malone's superbly wanton portrayal of a nymphomaniac and Stack's intense 
characterization of the wastrel alcoholic who goes berserk after a brief reforj 
mation. Both of these finely etched portraits overshadow the capable, thougll 
stock delineations by the other two stars, will undoubtedly be talked about i« 
eye-widening terms. 



Page 18 Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 





Film BULLETIN January 7, 1957 Page 1? 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCI 



All The Vital Details on Current &> Coming Features 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



ALLIED ARTISTS 



September 

CALLING HOMICIDE Bill Elliot, Jeane Cooper. Kath- 
leen Case. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Edward 
Bernds. Melodrama. Policeman breaks baby extortion 
racket. 61 min. 

FIGHTING TROUBLE Huntz Hall, Stanley Clements, 
Queenie Smith. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director George 
Blair. Comedy drama. Bowery Boys apprehend hood- 
lums by fast work with a camera. 61 min. 

STRANGE INTRUDER Edward Purdom, Ida Lupino, Ann 
Harding, Jacques Bergerac. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Irving Rapper. Drama. A returning Korean vet 
makes a strange promise to a dying comrade-in-arms. 
81 min. 

October 

CRUEL TOWER, THE John Ericson, Mari Blanchard, 
Charles McGraw. Producer Lindstey Parsons. Director 
Lew Landers. Drama. Steeplejacks fight for woman 
on high tower. 80 min. 

YAOUI DRUMS Rod Cameron, Mary Castle. Producer 
William Broidy. Director Jean Yarbrough. Western. 
Story of a Mexican bandit. 71 min. 

November 

BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in the death cell. 74 min. 

FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Marjorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Quaker family during the Civil War. 139 min. 10/1 

December 

HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 

HOT SHOTS Huntx Hall, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 62 min. 

January 

CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

GUN FOR A TOWN Dale Robertson, Brian Keith, 
Rossano Rory. Producer Frank Woods. Director Brian 
Keith. Western. 72 min. 

February 

ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 

BAD MEN OF COLORADO CinemaScope, Color. 
George Montgomery, James Best. Producer Vincent 
Fennelly. Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws 
use detective as only recognizable man in their hold- 
ups, thus increasing rward for his death or capture. 
81 min. 

NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 80 min. 

Coming 

ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 

DAUGHTER OF DR. JEKYLL John Agar, Gloria Talbot, 
Arthur Shields. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar linger. Horror. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 
Freeman, Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 
stockade in small western town. 81 min. 

HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle with unscrupulous hypnotist. 
61 min. 

HUNCHBACK OF PARIS. THE CinemaScope. Color. 
Glna Lollobrigida. Anthony Quinn. A Paris Production. 
Director Jean Delannoy. Drama. Hunchback falls in 
love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 
LAST OF THE BADMEN CinemaScope. Color. George 
Montgomery. James Best. Producer Vincent Fennelly 
Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws use detective 
as only recogniiable man in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 

Film 



LET'S BE HAPPY CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony 
Martin, Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Di- 
rector Henry Levin. Musical. 105 min. 

LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wilder. Drama. 

OKLAHOMAN, THE CinemaScope. DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
of unscrupulous brothers. 81 min. 

SIERRA STRANGER Howard Duff, Gloria McGhee. 
Western. 75 min. 



COLUMBIA 



September 

MIAMI EXPOSE Lee J. Cobb. Patricia Medina, Ed- 
ward Arnold. Produce: Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
Sears. Melodrama. Mob schemes to introduce legalized 
gambling in Miami, Florida. 73 min. 8/6. 
1984 Edmund O'Brien, Michael Redgrave, Jan Sterling. 
A Holiday Production. Director Michael Anderson. 
Drama. From the novel by George Orwell. 91 min. 

SPIN A DARK WEB Faith Domergue, Lee Patterson, 
Rona Anderson. Producer George Maynard. Director 
Vernon Sewell. Melodrama. Engineer gets involved 
with racketeers. 76 min. 7/23. 

October 

PORT AFRIQUE Technicolor. Pier Angelli, Phil Carey, 
Dennis Price. Producer David E. Rose. Director Rudy 
Mate. Drama. Ex-Air Force flyer finds murderer of 
his wife. 92 min. 9/17. 

SOLID GOLD CADILLAC. THE Judy Holliday, Paul 
Douglas, Fred Clark. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Filimization of the famous 
Broadway play about a ladv stockholder in a large 
holding company. 99 min. 8/20. 

STORM CENTER Bette Davis, Brian Keith, Paul Kelley, 
Kim Hunter. Producer Julian Blaustein. Director Daniel 
Taradash. Drama. A librarian protests the removal of 
"controversial" from her library, embroils a small 
town in a fight. 85 min. 8/6. 

November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdonald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD, THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 
graphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
Yves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 

WHITE SQUAW, THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bick- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 

December 

LAST MAN TO HANG, THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE Takashi Shimura. Toshiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Akira Kurosawa. 
Melodrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/10 
RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY, THE Technicolor. Randolph Scott. 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the olory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 

January 

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, Alan Dale. Producer Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor Fred Sears. Musical. Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 



NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray. Anne Bancroft. Producer Ted 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaken 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money. 
78 min. 12/10. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest. Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
becomes notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 

February 

FUCl. OF LIFE Judy Holliday. Richard Conte, 
Salvatore Baccaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard 0"ine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wife 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival of 
child. 

GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murphy, Kathryn 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brown. Director George 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women to 
fight off Indian attack. 

WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Fhil Carey. Pro- 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. A 
beautiful girl wins a beauty contest and a "different" 
life. 

Coming 

BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. Cor- 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Direc- 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men seek 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Grayson, 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
Sears. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/15 
FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rita 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A War- 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drama. 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is in- 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 

GARMENT JUNGLE, THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Mat- 
thews. Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. Di- 
rector Robert Aldrich. Drama. 

KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller. Carol Thurston. Pro- 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad- 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-man 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroyed 
by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

MOST WANTED WOMAN, THE Victor Mature, Anita 
Ekberg, Trevor Howard. A Warwick Production. Di-| 
rector John Gilling. 

PAPA, MAMA. THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureux, 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul Le 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisian 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW. THE Betsy Garrett, Phil; 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Director 
William Asher. Melodrama. Seven-year old boy is the' 
only witness to a murder. 

SIERRA STRANGER Howard Duff, Gloria McGhee. Pro 
ducer David Yokozeki. Director Lee Sholem. Western 

STRANGE ONE, THE Ben Gazzara, James Olsen, Georgi 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James Gar 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames com 
mander and his son. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atl. 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in Word 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL RIDER, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone 
Maureen Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Directo 1 
Budd Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles t 
be independent. 

27TH DAY, THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Produce, 
Helen Ainsworth. Director William Asher. Science 
fiction. People from outer space plot to destroy a I 
human life on the earth. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun. Susan Cummings, Angel 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred Sear 
Western. Two men join hands because they see in eac I 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY. THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmon ; 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Dram. 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



September 

FLESH AND THE SPUR ( American-International I Path 
color. John Agar, Maria English. Producer Alex Gc 
don. Director Edward Cahn. Western. Two gunnr 
search for the killer of their brother. 



B U L L E T I N — T H I S IS YOUR PRODUCT 



NAKED PARADISE I American- International) Pathecolcr. 
John Ireland, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Adventure. A young American saves 
a girl from disaster in a pagan paradise. 

PRIVATES PROGRESS IDCAI Richard Attenbrough, 
Dennis Price. A Boulting Bros. Production. Comedy. A 
young Britisher romps through Army life. 96 min. 

SECRETS OF THE REEF (Continental) Tri-Art Color. 
A Butterfield and Wolf Production. A sea documentary 
of an ancient Florida coral reef. 72 mm. 9/17. 

SHIP THAT DIED OF SHAME. THE I Continental I . Rich- 
ard Attenborouah, George Baker. A Rank Organization 
Production. Melodrama. A reconverted gun-boat rebels 
against her smuggler crew. 91 min. 9/17." 

WELCOME MISTER MARSHALL (Screen Art) Lolita 
Sevilla, Manolo Moran. Director Luis Berlanga. Pro- 
ducer Uninci. Comedy. A satire on the .'jmed Marshall 
Plan that takes place in a small Spanish town. 



October 



GUNSLINGER Color (American-International) John Ire- 
land, Beverly Garland, Alison Hayes. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Western. A notorious gunman terrorizes 
the West. 

RIFIFI . . . MEANS TROUBLE (United Motion Picture 
Organiiation) Jean Servais, Carl Mchner. Director 
Jules Dassis. Melodrama. English dubbed story of 
the French underworld. 120 min. 11/12. 

SWAMP WOMEN (Woolner) Color. Carole Mathews, 
Beverly Garland, Touch Connors. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Adventure. Wild women in the Louisiana 



November 



MARCELINO (United Motion Picture Organization) 
Pabilto Calvo, Rafael Rivelles. Director Ladislao 
Vadja. Drama. Franciscan monks find aoandoned baby 
and adopt him. 90 min. 11/12. 

SECRETS OF LIFE (Buena Vista). Latest in Walt Dis- 
ney's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/29. 

SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROCK I American-International) 
Lisa Gaye. Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson. 
Director Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 
roll" music. 

WEE GORDIE (George K. Arthur) Bill Travers, Elastair 
Sim, Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 
Frank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 
stature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwinq cham- 
pionship. 94 min. 11/12. 

WESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS (Buena Vista) Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kathleen Crowley. 
A Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 

December 

BABY AND THE BATTLESHIP. THE (DCA) Richard 
; Attenborough, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
borough. Director Jay Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 
smuggled aboard a British battleship during mock 

i BED OF GRASS (Trans-Lux) Anna Brazzou. Made in 
I Greece. English titles. Drama. A beautiful girl is per- 
secuted by her villiage for having lost her virtue as 
the victim of a rapist. 



LA SORCIERE [Ellis Films) Marina Vlady, Nicole 
Courel. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A young French 

■engineer meets untamed forest maiden while working 
n Sweden. French dialogue, English subtitles. 
ROCK, ROCK, ROCK IDCAI. Alan Freed, LaVern 
Baker, Frankie Lyman. A Vanguard Production. Musical 

[panorama of rock and roll. 
[WO LOVES HAVE I (Jacon) Technicolor. Gabriele 
-erzetti, Marta Toren. A Rizzoli Ffim. Director Carmine 
Sallone. Drama. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 

pest known operas. 



January 



3ULLFIGHT IJanus). French made documentary offers 
ustory and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
hnd directed by Pierre Braunberger. 74 min. 11/24. 
rITTELONI (API-Janusl. Franco Interlenghi Leonora 
-abrizi. Producer Mario de Vecehi. Director F. Fel- 
ini. Comedy. Story of unemployed young men in Italy. 
103 min. 11/24. 

Nc ARE ALL MURDERERS IKingsley International) 
(vlarcel Mouloudji, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
Sayette. Drama. 

February 

JOCK ALL NIGHT I American-International) Dick 
|vliller, Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson. Producer-director 
Itoger Corman. Rock n' roll musical. 

Coming 

:iTY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen Robert 
Mutton. Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Perroff. 

Jrama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 

F ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . (Buena Vistal 
|Vndre Valmy, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 

)rama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 

heir efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 

T CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International) 
I eter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 

• oger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 

pace takes control of the world until a scientist gives 
: is life to save humanity. 

; OST CONTINENT IIFE) CinemaScope, Ferranicolor. 
roducer-director Leonardo Bonzi. An excursion into the 
'ilds of Borneo and the Maylayan Archepeiago. Eng- 
ish commentary. 86 min. 



NEAPOLITAN CAROUSEL IIFE) ILuxFilm. Romel Pathe- 
coior. Print by Technicolor. Sophia Lortn, Leonioe 
Massint. Director Ettore Giannini. Mvsical. The history 
of Naples traced from 1600 to date in song and oance 
OKLAHOMA WOMAN (American Releasing Corp. ) 
Superscope. Richard Denning, Peggie Castle. Cathy 
Downs. Producer-director Roger Corman. Western. A 
ruthless woman rules the badlands lint" a reformed 
outlaw brings her to justice. SO min. 

REMEMBER, MY LOVE I Artists- Producers Assoc.! Cine- 
maScope. Technicclor. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer. 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell. Emeric Pressburger. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

RUNAWAY DAUGHTERS I American-International I 
Maria English. Anna Sten. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
rector Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
age problems. 

SMOLDERING SEA. THE Superscope. Producer Hal E. 
Chester. Drama. Conflict between the tyrannical cao- 
tain and crew of an American merchant ship reacnes 
its climax during battle of Guadalcanal. 
UNDEAD, THE (American-International) Pamela Dun- 
can, Altlton Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 

WEAPON. THE Superscope. Nicole Maurey. Producer 



involving 



Hal E. Chester. Drama. An unsolved 
a bitter U. S. war veteran, a Germah war bride ana 
killer is resolved after a child finds a loaded gun in 
bomb rubble 

WOMAN OF ROME iDCA) Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
Gelin. A Ponti-DeLaurentiis Production. Director Luigi 
Zampa. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
novel. 



METRO -GO LDWYN -MAYER 



September 



LUST FOR LIFE Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Kirk 
Douglas, Anthony Quinn, James Donald, Pamela Brown. 
Producer John Houseman. Director Vincente Minnelli. 
Film dramatization of the life and works of the famous 
artist, Vincent Van Gogh. 122 min. 9/17. 

TEA AND SYMPATHY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Deborah Kerr, John Kerr. Producer Pandro Berman. 
Director Vincente Minnelli. Drama. Wife of housemaster 
at New England school gets involved with young boy. 
122 min. 10/1. 



October 



JULIE Doris Day, Louis Jourdain. Producer Marty 
Melcher. Director Andrew Stone. Drama. Jealous hus- 
band plans to kill wife. 99 min. 10/15. 

OPPOSITE SEX. THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
June Alyyson, Joan Collins, Dolores Gray. Producer 
Joe Pasternak. Director David Miller. Comedy. The 
perfect wife is unaware of flaws in her marriage until 
a gossip friend broadcasts the news. 116 min. 10/1- 

POWER AND THE PRIZE CinemaScope. Robert Taylor, 
Burl Ives, Elisabeth Mueller. Director Henry Koster. 
Producer Nicholas Nayfak. Drama. Tale of big business 
and international romance. 98 min. 9/17. 

November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, Bob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
96 min. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME. THE Tom Ewell. Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 

TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON. THE Cinema- 
Scope. Eastman Color. Marlon Brando. Glenn Ford, 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Cemedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 
123 min. 10/29. 



January 



ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson, Martine Carol, Gustave Rojo. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. 

EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 

SLANDER Van Johnson, Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutsch. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 81 min. 



Coming 



BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET, THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gielgud, Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. 

DESIGNING WOMAN Gregory Peck. Lauren Bacall, 
Dolores Gray. Producer Dore Schary. Director Vincente 
Minnelli. 

HAPPY ROAD. THE Gene Kelly, Michael Redgrave, 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors, Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 
HARVEST THUNDER Pier Angeli, Mel Ferrer, Leif 
Erickson. Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Jeffrey Hay- 
den. Drama. 

RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery CI if t. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle I800's. 



JANUARY SUMMARY 

The new year gets off to a nice start 
with 30 features scheduled for release 
during January. RKO will be the leading 
supplier wth five films, while Columbia 
and United Artists will release four each. 
20th, Metro and the Independents will re- 
lease three each; Allied Artists. Republic 
and Universal, two each. Paramount and 
Warners will each place one feature on 
the agenda. 18 of the releases will be 
dramas. Seven January films will be in 
color. 



17 Dramas 
4 Westerns 
1 Melodrama 



5 Comedies 

2 Musicals 

1 Documentary 



LIVING IDOL, THE CinemaScope. Eastman Color 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Al Lewin. Drama. An archeologist is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson, Dana Wynter, 
Wendy Htller. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. 

TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberqhetti. Producer 
Joseph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 
WING5 Of- THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne, Dan 
Dailey, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. 



September 

VAGABOND KING, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Katn- 
ryn Grayson, Oreste, Rita Moreno. Producer Pat Dug- 
gan. Director Michael Curtiz. Musical drama. Vagabond 
band helps French Kina rout nooles who would over- 
throw him. 88 min. 9/17. 

October 

SEARCH FOR ERIDEY MURPHY, THE Louis Hayward, 
Teresa Wright. Producer Pat Duggan. Director Noel 
Langley. Drama. Tne famous book by Morey Bernstein 
on film. 84 min. 

November 

MOUNTAIN. THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane has 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in the 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about the 
movies. 95 min. 12/10. 

WAR AND PEACE VistaVisic-i Technicolor. Audrey 
Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer. Producers Carle 
Ponti. Dino de Laurentiis. Director King Vidor. Dram* 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 



January 



THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 
100 min. 



February 



RAINMAKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster, Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 



March 



FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of ttie Boston baseball player. 



Coming 



BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 

BUSTER KEATON STORY, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. 

DELICATE DELINQUENT, THE Jerry Lewis, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



FLAMENECA VistaVision, Technicolor. Carmen SevlUa, 
Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director Don- 
ald Siegel. 

FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audrey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens. Director Stanley Donen. Musical. 
GU NFIGHT AT O.K. CORRAL VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallis. Director John Sturges. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his cheating 
brother. 

LONELY MAN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Perkins, Elaine Aiken. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he Is losing his sight — and his aim. 
OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget. Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure. 
The life and times of medieval Persia's literary idol. 
TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE VistaVision Technicolor 
Charlton Meston y ul Brynner, Anne Bax'e- °roduc»r- 
dir*r«o' Cecil 9 DeMille Reliaious drama Life srorv 
of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 219 min. 10/15 
TIN STAR. THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda, Anthony 
Perkins. A Perlberg-Seaton Production. Director An- 
thony Mann. Western. 



REPUBLIC 



September 

DANIEL BOONE. TRAILELA2ER Trucolor. Bruce Ben- 
nett, Lon Chaney, Faron Young. An Albert Gannaway 
Production. Adventure. Daniel Boone and a group of 
settlers fight off savage Indians to establish Kentucky 
settlement. 74 min. 

MAN IS ARMED, THE Dane Clark, William Tallman, 
May Wyn.i, Robert Horton. Director Franklin Adreon. 
Melodrama. A half-million dollar holdup of an 
armored transport comoany's headquarters creates an 
avalanche of violence. 70 min. 

October 

SCANDAL INCORPORATED Robert Hutton, Paul Rich- 
ards, Patricia Wright. A C.M.B. Production. Director 
Edward Mann. Drama. Expose of scandal magazines 
preying on movie stars and other celebrities. 79 min. 

November 

A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker, 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 
CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope. Trucolor. 
Johanna Mati, Rudojf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intrigue and mystery in Vienna during 
the time of Prince Metternich. 

TEARS FOR SIMON Eastman Color. David Farrar, 
David Knight, Julia Arnall. A J. Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama. Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child stolen. 

December 

ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor. David Brian, Vera 
Ralston. Melodrama. Associate producer-director 
Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland lawyer is 
murdered by attractive girl singer. 

IN OLD VIENNA Trucolor. Heinz Roettinger, Robert 
Killick. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal. Romances and triumphs of Franz Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 

January 

ABOVE UP THE WAVES John Mills, John Gregson, 
Donald Sinden. Producer W. MacQuitty. Director Ralph 
Thomas. Drama. Midget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWII. 

AFFAIR IN RENO Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G. Spring- 
stein. Drama. Young heiress falls for fortune-hunting 
gambler. 

Coming 

DUEL AT APACHE WELLS Naturama, Trucolor. Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Western. Son returns home to 
find father's ranch threatened by rustler-turned-rancher. 
HELL'S CROSSROADS Naturama. Stephen McNally, 
Peggie Castle, Robert Vauhgn. Producer Rudy Ral- 
ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after joining Jesse James' gang. 
SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Vera Ralston, R-H Camer- 
on. Producer-director Joe Kane. 




August 

FIRST TRAVELING SALESLADY, THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Ginger Rogers, Barry Nelson, Carol 
Channing. Producer-director Arthur Lubin. Comedy. A 
lady salesman launches an innovation in corsets — in 
1897. 92 min. 8/20. 

September 

BACK FROM ETERNITY Robert Ryan, Anita Ekberg, 
Rod Steiger, Phyllis Kirk. Producer-director John Far- 
row. Drama. Three crew members and seven passen- 
gers crash land in the Central American jungle. 97 min. 

Film 



BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT Dana Andrews. Joan 
Fontaine, Barbara Nichois. Producer Bert Friedlob. 
Director Fritz Lang. Drama. A writer attempts to prove 
that an innocent man can be convicted by circum- 
stantial evidence. 80 min. 

October 

FINGER OF GUILT Richard Basehart, Mary Murphy, 
Constance Cummings. Producer-director Alec Snowden. 
Drama. Film producer receives letters from a girl he 
never met, who insists they were lovers. 84 min. 11/26 

TENSION AT TAELE ROCK Color. Richard Egan, 
Dorothy Malone, Cameron Mitchell. Producer Sam 
Weisenthal. Director Charles Warren. Western. The 
victory of a town over violence. 93 min. 10/29. 

November 

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL George Sanders, Yvonne 
DeCarlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor. Producer-director Charles 
Martin. Melodrama. Tale of an international financial 
wizard. 119 min. 11/12. 

December 

MAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg, Bill Campbell, 
Karen Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A young locksmith gets 
involved with a group engaged in illegal activities. 
73 min. 

January 

BRAVE ONE. THE CinemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
Ray, Fermin Rivera, Joy Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. Pro- 
ducer Frank I Maurice King. Director Irving Rapper. 
Drama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
irows up with a bull as his main comoanion and friend 
and how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 

BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Debbie 
Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Adolph Menjou. Producer Ed- 
mund Grainger. Director Norman Taurog. Comedy. 
Son of department store magnet falls for salesgirl. 
98 min. 12/24. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking second place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 

YOUNG STRANGER, THE James MacArthur, Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Franken- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 
parents. 

February 

SILKEN AFFAIR. THE David Niven, Genevieve Page, 
Ronald Squire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director Roy 
Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on a kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 min. 

THAT NIGHT John Beal, Augusta Dabney, Shepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Director John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a 15- 
year-old marriage. 

March 

RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 

Coming 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY, THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 

ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY, THE Eastman Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublin. 
Director Mitchell Leison. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hughes Production. Producer 
Jules Furth'man Director Jo'sef von Sterncerg. Drama. 
119 min. 

LADY AND THE PROWLER, THE Color. Diana Dors, 
Rod Steiger, Marie Windsor. Producer-director John 
Farrow. Drama. A wife sunningly plots the death of 
her husband who she has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS, THE Arthur O'Connell, Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director John Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



September 

BEST THINGS IN LIFE ARE FREE, THE CinemaScope, 
DeLuxe Color. Gordon MacRae, Dan Dailey, Sheree 
North. Producer Henry Ephron. Director Michael 
Curtiz. Musical. Musical biography of sor.gwriting team 
— DeSilva, Brown and Henderson. 104 min. 10/1. 
LAST WAGON, THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. 
Richard Widmark, Felicia Farr. Producer William 
Hawks. Director Delmar Daves. Western. Family travels 
along Oregon trail against great odds. 99 min. 9/3. 



October 

BETWEEN HEAVEN AND HELL CinemaScope. De- 
Luxe Color. Robert Wagner, Terry Moore. Producer 
David Weisbart. Director Robert Fleischer. War drama. 
World War II setting in he Pacific. 94 min. 10/29. 
STAGECOACH TO FURY CinemaScope. horrest Tucker, 
Mari Blanchard, Wally Ford, Wright King. Producer 
Earle Lyon. Director William Claxton. Western. Mexican 
bandits hold up stage coach in search for gold. 76 min. 
TEENAGE REBEL CinemaScope. Ginger Rogers, Michael 
Rennie. Producer Charles Brackett. Director S. Engle. 
Comedy. Mother and daughter find mutual respect and 
devotion. 94 min. 10/29. 

November 

DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN. THE Robert Arthur, Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 
73 min. 11/26. 

LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley, Richard 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentucky 
locale. 89 min. I 1/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope, Technicolor. Gordon Mac- 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn- 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza- 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 

December 

ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg- 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler. 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Filmization of famous 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 

BLACK WHIP. THE Hugh Marlowe, Adele Mara. Pro- 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. 77 min. 
GIRL CAN'T HELP IT. THE CinemaScope, De Luxe 
Color. Tom Ewell, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-director 
Frank Tashlin. Comedy. 

OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michele Morgan, Cornell 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd Os- 
wald. Director Yves Allgret. Drama. Gold smuggler 
falls in love with lady sent to kill him. Violent ending. 
WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. James 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Production. 
Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 

January 

GUIET GUN, THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mara 
Morday. Western. 

THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Milland, Ernest 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Philip 
Dunne. Drama. 

THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope. 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herbert 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The lives 
and time of America's famous outlaw gang. 

Coming 

BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina Lollobrigida. Vit- 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Director 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

HEAVEN KNOWS MR. ALLISON CinemaScope De Luxe 
Color. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Producers 
Buddy Adler, Eugene Frenke. Director John Huston. 
Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific during WWII. 
RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brady, 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director Alan 
Dwan. 

SEA WIFE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Richard Bur- 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director Bob 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarine 
off Singapore harbor. 

SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Rich- 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Producer- 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussie boy 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 

STORM RIDER. THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers. A 
Bradv-Glasser production. Director Edward Bernds. 
Western. 



UNITED ARTISTS 



September 

AMBASSADOR'S DAUGHTER, THE CinemaScope, Tech- 
nicolor. Olivia de Havilland, John Forsythe, Myrna toy. 
Producer-director Norman Krasna. Romantic comedy. 
The affairs of a diolomat's daughter and a romance- 
hungry G. I. 102 min. 8/6. 

BANDIDO CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Robert Mit- 
chum, Ursula Thiess, Gilbert Roland. Prodlcer Robert 
Jacks. Director Richard Fleischer. Drama. Gun-runninc 
during a revolt in Mexico in 1916. 91 min. 
GUN BROTHERS Buster Crabbe, Ann Robinson 
Neville Brand. A Grant Production. Director Sidney 
Salkow. Drama. Two brothers, each on different side 
of law, fight it out together. 79 min. 9/17. 

October 

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS I Michael Todo 
Productions' Todd-AO, Color. David Niven, Cantiflas 
Martine Cam:. Producer M. Todd. Director Michae 
Anderson. Adventure. Filmization of the famous Jule 
Verne novel. 175 min. 10/29. 

ATTACK Jack Palance, Eddie Albert, Lee Marvin. Pro 
ducer-director Robert Aldrich. Drama. A cowardl' 
army officer and his men during a crucial battle o 
World War II. 107 min. 9/17. 

BOSS. THE John Payne, Doe Avedon, William Bishop 
Producer Frank Seltzer. Director Byron Haskin. Melo 
drama. A city falls prey to a corrupt political ma 
chine. 89 min. 9/17. 



BULLETIN— THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



UNITED ARTISTS (Continu.*) 

FLIGHT TO HONG KONG Rory Calhoun. Dolores Don- 
Ion. A Sabre Production. Director Joe Newman. Drama. 
An airline flight to Hong Kong sparks international 
intrigue. 88 min. 10/15. 

MAN FROM DEL RIO Anthony Quinn, Katy Jurado. 
Producer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. West- 
ern. Badman turns sheriff in lonely town. 82 min. 10/15 

November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness. Angle Dickin- 
son, Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Director 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunman gets 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him when 
wounded. 78 min. 

PEACEMAKER. THE James Mitchell, Rosemarie Bowe, 
Jan Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post. 
Western. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattle- 
men and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 

REVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Dehner, Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
rector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
soldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 min. 

RUNNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dowling, 
Arthur Franz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Couffer. 
Director Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped fugi- 
tives are chased by local townspeople and officer of 
the law. 83 min. 11/12. 

SHARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe, Color. Victor 
Mature, Karen Steele. Producer Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 
Director Jerry Hopper. Drama. Saga of the Navy's 
"underwater-men". 73 min. 10/29. 

December 

BRASS LEGEND, THE Hugh O'Brian, Raymond Burr, 
Nancy Gates. Western. Producer Bob Goldstein. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Western. 7? min. 
DANCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. 
Producer Robert Goldstein, Director Charles Barton. 
Comedy. 7? min. 12/24. 

KING AND FOUR OUEENS, THE CinemaScope Color. 
Clark Sable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willis, 
Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 
stead. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 
WILD PARTY, THE Anthony Quinn, Carol Ohmart, Paul 
Stewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 
Horner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval offi- 
cer and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 

January 

BIG EOODLE, THE Errol Flynn, Rossana Rory. A Lewis 
F. Blumberg Production. Drama. 

FIVE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden. 
A Grand Production. Director Henry Kesler. Drama. 
A woman tries to give FBI highly secret material stolen 
from Russians. 

HALLIDAY BRAND, THE Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lind- 
fors. Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
[Joseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
Father and son with disaster. 77 min. 

MONTE CARLO STORY, THE Marlene Dietrich, Vittorio 
3e Sica, Arthur O'Connell. A Titanus Production. Di- 
rector Samuel Taylor. Drama. Widowed American mil- 
| ionaire seeks to marry beautiful woman. 

Coming 

BACHELOR PARTY, THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall, 
Jack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 

IvHann. From Hie famous television drama by Paddy 

1 Chayeftky. 

3AILOUT AT 43,000 John Payne, Karen Steele. A Pine- 
rhomas Production. Director Francis Lyon. 
JIG CAPER, THE R«ry CaJhound, Mary Costa. Pine- 
Twmat Producfio*. Wrector Robert Stevens. 
:RIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling 
Hayden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen. Di- 
ector G«rd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 
imbition for her husband leads to murder. 
iIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS, THE Lex Barker, Anne 
lancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production. Di- 
•ctor Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slayings 
I erroriie western resort. 
HIDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
^ubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth. 
)rama. 

HIS FATHER'S GUN Dane Clark, Ben Cooper, Lori Nel- 
oa. Bel Air Production. Director Lesley Selander. 
■ ONELY GUN, TH£ Anthony Ouinn, Kary Jurado. Pro- 
lucer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 
AlH IN WAR Robert Ryan, Aldo Ray, Robert Keith, 
producer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann. 
MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD, THE Tim 
Holt, Audrey Dalton. A Gramercy Production. Director 
Arnold Laven. Science-fiction. 

'HAROAH'S CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Howard Koch. Director Lee Sholem. Horror. Repar- 
ation of mummies. 

'RIDE AND THE PASSION. THE VistaVision. Techni- 
olor. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren. Pro- 
ucer-dlrector Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
luernlla band marches an incredible distance with a 
000 pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
nce of 1810. 

AVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor. Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
v Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
alls in love with a peasant who contests her right 
o rule the kingdom. 101 min. 

TREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery, Geraldine 
rooks. Producer William Berke. 

ROOPER HOOK Joel McCrea. Barbara Stanwyck, Ed- 
;ard Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marquis 
Varren. 



12 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda. Lee J, Cobb, Jack 
Warden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sidney 
Lumet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 

VODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff. B;verly Tyler. A Bel 
Air Production. Director Reginald Le Borg. Horror. 



U N I VERSA L- 1 NT' L 



September 

EDGE OF HELL Hugo Haas, Francesca DeScafia, Ken 
Carlton. Producer-director Hugo Haas. Drama. A for- 
mer actor becomes a professional beager with the 
aid of a trick dog. 76 min. 7/23. 

I'VE LIVED BEFORE Jock Mahoney. Leigh Snowden, 
Ann Harding. Producer Howard Christie. Director Rich- 
ard Bartlett. Drama. Story of a reincarnated airplane 
pilot. 82 min. 8/6. 

RAW EDGE Technicolor. Rory Calhoun, Yvonne De- 
Carlo, Mara Corday. Producer Albert Zubsmirh. Direc- 
tor John Sherwood. Drama. Fueda' baron rules the 
Oregon frontier with an iron hand. 76 min. 9/3. 

WALK THE PROUD LAND Technicolor. Audie Murphy. 
Anne Bancroft, Pat Crowley. Producer Aaron Rosen- 
berg. Director Jesse Hibbs. Drama. Indian agent for 
U.S. Government fights for human right; for the 
Apache Indians in Arizon. 88 min. 7/23. 

October 

PILLARS OF THE SKY Technicolor. Jeff Chandler, 
Dorothy Malone, Ward Bond. Producer Robert Arthur. 
Director George Marshall. Drama. The spirit of Religion 
helps to settle war bewteen Indians and Cavalrymen 
in the Oregon Country. 95 min. 9/3. 

SHOWDOWN AT ABILENE Technicolor. Jock Mahoney, 
Martha Myer, Lyle Bettger. Producer Howard Christie. 
Director Charles Haas. Western. Cowboy returns to 
Abilene after four years in the Confederate Army to 
find things considerably changed. 80 min. 9/3. 

November 

UNGUARDED MOMENT, THE Technicolor. Esther Wil- 
liams, George Nader. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Drama. High school teacher is almost 
criminally assaulted by student. 95 min. 9/3. 

December 

CURCU, BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
Bromfield, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay, 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siodnak. Horror. Young 
woman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
are terrorized by mysterious jungle beast. 

EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
Maureen O'Hara, John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
dent gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 11/12. 

MOLE PEOPLE, THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror. 
Scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 

January 

FOUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
George Nader, Julie Adams, Marianne Cook. Producer 
A. Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
85 min. 12/10 

ROCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo, John Saxon, Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
Bartlett. Musical. Rock n' roll story of college combo. 
89 min. II/}*. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
Lauren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
smith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
violent death because of Jealousy for wife. 99 min. 10/1 

February 

GREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
rer. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
idol. 92 min. 11/26. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope, Technicolor. Errol Hynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 

NIGHT RUNNER, THE Ray Danton, Colleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Biberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 

Coming 

BATTLE HYMN Technicolor. Rock Hudson, Martha Hyer, 
Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of guilt because of 
bombing of an orphanage by saving other orphans. 
108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD Technicolor. Fred MacMurray, 
Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Producer William Alland. 
Director Abner Biberman. Western. Three brothers run 
a cattle ranch after the death of their father. 
INTERLUDE Technicolor, CinemaScope. June Allyson, 
Rossano Brani. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy, George Nader, Keenan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. 
KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son, Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of dog- 
act in show business in the early I930's. 



MAN AFRAID George Nader. Tim Hovey. Producer 
Gordon Kay. Director Harry Keller. 

MISTER CORY Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford Producer 
Robert Artuhr. Director Blake Edwards. Gambler from 
Chicago slums climbs to wealth and respectability. 
TAMMY CinemaScope. Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds. 
Lslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Rosenberg Director Joe 
Pevney. 

TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arnold. 



WARNED BROTHERS 



September 

A CRY IN THE NIGHT Edmond 0'8rien. Natalie Wood, 
Brian Donlevy. A Jaguar Production. Director Frank 
Tyttie. Drama. Mentally unbalanced man surprises 
couple in Lover's Lane. 75 min. 8/20. 

AMAZON TRADER, THE WarnerColor. John Suttcn. 
Producer Cedric Francis. Director Tom McGowan. Ad- 
venture. Stirring events in the Amaion territory of 
Brazil. 41 min. 

BAD SEED, THE Nancy Kelly, Patty McCormack, Henry 
Jones. Produced and directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Dra- 
ma. Film version of the famous Broadway play aboul 
a child murderess. 129 min. 

BURNING HILLS, THE CinemaScooe, WarnerColor. Tab 
Hunter. Natalie Wood. Skip Homeir. Producer Rich- 
ard Whorf. Director Stuart Heisler. Western. Young 
man seeks his brother's murderer. 92 min. 8/20. 

October 

TOWARD THE UNKNOWN WarnerColor. William Hol- 
den, Lloyd Nolan, Virginia Leith. Producer-director 
Mervyn LeRoy. Drama. Test pilots experiment in jet 
and rocket propelled aircraft to probe outer space 
and physical limits of man. 115 min. I 0 / 1 - 

November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor. Rock Hudson. 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens. Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND, THE Tab Hunter, Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler. Drama. Army turns immature boy into man. 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BABY DOLL Karl Maiden, Carroll Baker, FJi Wallach. 
A Newton Production. Prooucer-director Elia Kazan. 
Drama. Story of •» gir.-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. I 14 min. 12/24. 

January 

WRONG MAN, THE Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony 
Ouayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club is prime suspect in 
murder case. 105 min. 

Coming 

BIG LAND, THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd. Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move their herds to 
distant railroads. 

NIGHT DOES STRANGE THINGS, THE Technicolor. 
Ingrid Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco- 
London Film. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of 
the exiled widow of a Polish Prince. 

SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, THE CinemaScope, Warner- 
Color James Stewart, Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director Billy Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlantic in a plane. 



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cppV 



CONTROL OF LOEW S 

Who Shall Make the Future - 
Experienced Manpower, or the 
Board of Non-Movie Directors? 

Read FINANCIAL « VIEWPOINTS 



PROFILE OF THE MOVIE CUSTOMER 



Patterns of Patronage 





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AKIM TAMIROFF 
MARTITA HUNT 

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Produced by BUDDY ADL! 
Directed by ANATOLE LITVi 
Screenplay by ARTHUR LAUREN) 




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Viewpoints 

JANUARY 21, 1957 * voiumc »K no ? 



VOLUME 25, NO. 2 



Control 
Of M^avu? 9 s 

It is difficult at this moment to 
determine just who was victorious in 
the struggle for control of Loew's, 
Inc. Joseph Tomlinson, leader of the 
dissident stockholders, has folded 
his proxy battle tents, apparently 
satisfied with the new slate of direc- 
tors to be presented to the stock- 
holders. Joseph Vogel, president of 
the company, displaying a notable 
flair for diplomacy, seems to have 
appeased the various groups of 
stockholders who have been de- 
manding new faces at the policy- 
making level. Now must be resolved 
the question: Who is to make 
Loew's future? 

There is no denying that the nomi- 
nated board of directors assures 
Loew's of ample keen business 
brains to grace its corporate board. 
But, for all its distinguished mem- 
bership, this group comprises a film 
company board of curious genre. 
With the exception of Mr. Vogel and 
Stanley Meyer, none of the other 
eleven nominees have any known 
experience in the production, distri- 
bution or exhibition of motion pic- 
tures. This is not meant to insist 
that only "old hands" at the movie 
game ar e qualified to govern the af- 
fairs of a film company. To the con- 
trary, new blood is essential, we be- 
lieve, to reenergize this industry. 
Tzo many movie old-timers are liv- 
ing in that dream-world of the "good 
old days", and lack the zest for tackl- 
ing the necessary rebuilding job. 
However, motion pictures are a 
unique commodity, and their intrica- 
cies are not usually immediately ap- 
parent to those without experience 
in some phase of show business. 

The lack of a logical balance 
between experience and new blood 
on the proposed Loew board of di- 
rectors will throw a very heavy 
burden on president Vogel. If he is 
to have a fair chance to restore to 



the company its proud tradition, it 
is essential that the new board, to- 
gether with Mr. Tomlinson and 
other influential stockholders, 
promptly, publicly confirm Mr. 
Vogel's authority to do the job. 

. I Business ©/ 
Ups untl Downs 

Those in the industry who are 
tempted by periodic business dold- 
rums to look fearfully for the demise 
of exhibition might do well to take 
note of the recent statement by 
Stanley Warner president S. H. 
Fabian to the company's stock- 
holders. Uncolored by supposition 
and wishful thinking, Mr. Fabian's 
message glowed a subdued pink of 
optimism based on facts. 

Reporting a better than $3 million 
increase in gross income for the 
quarter ended last November, and a 
corresponding net profit, Mr. Fabian 
noted that the release of quality pic- 
tures continued to reflect increased 
boxoffice receipts. He pointed out 
that since the first week in Novem- 
ber, each week's gross has topped 
that of the same periods in the pre- 
vious year, climaxed by the week 
ended Jan. 5 ringing up the largest 
single week since the organization 
of Stanley Warner. It is significant 
that the increase was accomplished 
with fewer theatres than last year. 

This bright boxoffice picture might 
have moved more impressionable 



BULLETIN 



Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trade Paper 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax, Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 1239 Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa., LOcust 8-0950, 0951. 
Philip R. Ward, Associate Editor- Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan G. 
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Publication Manager; Robert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: 522 Fifth Avenue, 
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theatremen to soaring flights of 
fancy as to the future of the movie 
theatre. Mr. Fabian, however, was 
quitely realistic. The rise, he 
stressed, was "encouraging but not 
necessarily conclusive as to the 
trend of future grosses". Even as he 
spoke, a cold wave throughout much 
of the country brought about a 
sharp drop in theatre attendance. 

Certainly there will be temporary 
setbacks that will give the gloom 
mongers fresh toeholds. The 
weather, always a factor, is much 
more so with home television a con- 
venient prop to fall back on when 
the elements are forbidding. So will 
special events, sports, holidays, and 
all the other perpetual influences on 
the boxoffice — including poor pic- 
tures. 

But with every indication that the 
quality of the product which thea- 
tres will have to offer will be up to 
par or better, upbeat attitudes, 
coupled with hard work and show- 
manship, are necessary to eke out 
the full potential of every picture. 

Theatremen everywhere can take 
their cue from Mr. Fabian's balanced 
thinking. Ours is a business of ups 
and downs, more sensitive to vari- 
ables than the average commercial 
enterprise. We must not let the 
"ups" make us complacent nor the 
"downs" despairing. Let's just take 
for granted that theatre business is 
here to stay — and concentrate on 
making the most of every oppor- 
tunity to better it. 



xlfl Aiiti'rivtttt 
Suw€*ss Story 

1951, $18 million; 1952, $28 mil- 
lion; 1953, $36 million; 1954, $44 
million; 1955, $55 million, and in 
1956, an all-time record high of $65,- 
300,000: These gross income figures 
tell the phenomenal story of United 
Artists' growth under the executive 
(Continued on Page 5) 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 3 




Just what the 
Public wants! 



A GREAT 

LOVE 
STORY! 



"Powerful love story. Strong, popular 

attraction." —Hollywood Reporter 

Just selected "Picture of the Month." 

—Seventeen Magazine (for millions of teen-agers!) ^ 




M-G-M 



presents 



in CINEMASCOPE and METROCOLOR 




Jennifer Jones, 
'"Many Splenclon, 
star, more romam. 
than ever! 



JENNIFER JONES 
JOHN GIELGUD 

BILL TRAVERS ■ VIRGINIA McKENNA , 

THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET 

Screen Play by JOHN DIGHTON • F rudolf besIer" • Directed by SIDNEY FRANKLIN Produced by SAM ZIMBALIST 

(Available in Magnetic Stereophonic, Perspecta Stereophonic or 1-Channel Sound) 



BOX-OFFICE LINES: Elopement was the only way out! Rescued from her "prison" home, to know lovt 
for the first time! »"Oh, Robert, do you know what you've done for me? I wanted to live eagerly, desperately 
passionately. Oh, and so much more than that!" — Elizabeth. • "Dear Elizabeth: I shall love you to the end — anc 
beyond." — Robert. • Unkissed — wanting love, needing love, denied love — she dared give her heart to a handsomt 
stranger at first meeting! • A famous literary love story! A hit Broadway play! Now — a magnificent new film 



IKO-U DEAL SET. Only final details of the deal where- 
y RKO product will be turned over to Universal for dis- 
ribution remained to be ironed out late last week. Tom 
VNeil's representatives and U-I executives were sched- 
led to meet at U's offices the first part of this week, with 
tie transaction expected to be finalized by Wednesday 
23rd). U president Milton Rackmil is understood to have 
eadied a statement setting forth the details of the deal, 
nd it is expected that O'Neil will shortly outline RKO's 
uture plans. 

0 

JA STOCK ISSUE. Mark down as a certainty that 
Jnited Artists will issue stock to the public within 1957. 
"he management group is firmly convinced that the com- 
any's upward march can continue only if it has funds to 
•rovide complete financing and studio facilities to inde- 
pendents. To be expected also is UA's direct entry into 
.iroduction. Several films already are on the drawing 
•oard. 

0 

TRST-RUN METAMORPHOSIS? The recent first-run 
howing of Allied Artists' "Friendly Persuasion" in De- 
jroit naborhood houses has reopened talk about a possible 
hift of first-runs away from the downtown showcases, 
"here is talk again about population shifts to suburban 
reas, shopping centers, parking problems downtown, etc. 
is factors for multiple first-run engagements. However, 
onsensus of opinion among the distribution and circuit 
heatre executives is that naborhood first-runs are feasible 



Whai They're hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



only when a picture lacks the boxoffice power for a sus- 
tained downtown engagement or in special situations. The 
naborhood theatre is in no position, at the present time, to 
threaten the downtowners because of its inability to match 
the earning power and extended publicity available to a 
first-run center city opening. 

0 

PARAMOUNT & TV. It has been generally believed 
thac Paramount's delay in selling its old feature library on 
the television market has been due to the company's ex- 
pectations that pay-to-see TV was just around the corner. 
It now appears that with the toll venture seeming more 
remote Paramount may be ready to take the plunge. If 
and when that happens, this outfit figures to profit hand- 
somely by the experience of the other film companies with 
video. There will be no haphazard dumping of films. 
Ownership will be retained by Paramount and the pictures 
will be released to TV on a schedule that will guarantee 
maximum revenue returns. First-run showings of the 
Paramount library will go to the Dumont outlets in New 
York, Los Angeles and Washington, in which Paramount 
has large holdings. 



Viewpoints 

(Continued from Page 3) 

direction of Arthur Krim, Robert S. 
Benjamin, William J. Heineman, 
Max E. Youngstein and Arnold M. 
Picker. It is one of the most impres- 
sive accomplishments in our indus- 
try's history — all the more so be- 
cause it came about during some 
difficult movie years. 

This organization provided the in- 
dependent producer with benefits of 
canny operation, bold selling and in- 
creasing participation in the financ- 
ing picture. Keenly alert to the 
future, UA's plans for 1957 and 1958, 
says president Krim, call for 100 per 
cent production financing by the 
company. Negotiations are being 
carried on with exhibitors who have 
indicated interest in participating in 
this financing, and serious consider- 
ation is being given to a public stock 



issue. Thus is revealed more of the 
shrewd business operation that has 
been responsible for a 350% increase 
in gross revenue for the company 
since the present management team 
took over. 

The independent product market 
quite possibly will tighten up under 
the Treasury's new interpretation of 
the corporate tax picture, which 
threaten to discourage "personal 
corporations" set up by stars and di- 
rectors to capture the advantage of 
capital gains taxes. Big money 
names would be harder to get and 
the inde film maker will be faced 
with increasing financing difficulties. 
By launching their bold production 
money move, the UA team has ob- 
viously anticipated this situation and 
is girding to overcome it. 

This is typical of the resourceful- 
ness that has marked the operations 
of United Artists from the outset of 
the present regime. It is a success 
story that is the American Story all 
over again. 




The 
Mail 
Box 



To the Editor : 

That was a superb article on 
BABY DOLL. I am, and everyone 
with me is thrilled at what you said. 
I also thought there was tremendous 
integrity in the article. I agree es- 
pecially with what you say about the 
importance of the American movie. 
Well, in fact, I agree with every- 
thing you have written and your 
whole attack on the subject and 
your piece made me very happy. 

Sincerely yours, 

ELIA KAZAN 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 5 



"Three Brave Men" 

Gututete Rotate O O Plus 

Engrossing, factual story of unjust disloyalty charge. Semi- 
documentary, journalistic style, much flag-waving. 

The factual case history of a Navy Department em- 
ployee's unjust dismissal as a "security risk" is re-enacted 
with candor and good human interest values. The Cinema- 
Scope (black and white) production for 20th Century-Fox 
by Herbert B. Swope, Jr., based on a Pulitzer Prize-win- 
ning series written by Anthony Lewis, is recorded with 
such concern for detail and fact that it assumes a docu- 
mentary tone. This quality adds to its appeal for that 
growing audience which seeks out off-beat film entertain- 
ment. If this element is properly exploited, grosses should 
be above average in metropolitan areas. Good perform- 
ances are turned in by Ernest Borgnine as the accused em- 
ployee, and Ray Milland as the lawyer who defends him. 
Supporting cast includes Frank Lovejoy, Nina Foch and 
Dean Jagger. Director Philip Dunne, who also adapted the 
screenplay, develops a completely realistic atmosphere. 
Navy Secretary Jagger approves Borgnine's dismissal as a 
security risk in 1953 when a new program is inaugurated. 
Attorney Milland, representing him at a formal hearing, 
shows that statements were made against Borgnine by 
members of the housing cooperative, who opposed his 
views on rentals. The board, headed by Lovejoy, turns in 
a favorable report, but Borgnine is not reinstated, and 
when Milland appeals, the case is reopened. A re-investi- 
gation shows that testimony and sworn statements were 
prejudiced and full of half-truths. At a press conference, 
Jagger apologizes, Borgnine is reinstated with back pay. 

20th Century-Fox. 88 minutes. Ray Milland. Ernest Borgnine, Frank Loveioy, Nina 
Foch. Produced by Herbert B. Swope, Jr. Directed by Philip Dunne. 

"Above Us the Waves" 

Tightly drawn, British-made submarine battle meller. Good 
dualler for U.S. market. 

This well-produced, suspensefully directed sea adven- 
ture centering around a dangerous mission of British mid- 
get submarines during World War II should provide ade- 
quate dual bill support in the U.S. The script is terse, act- 
ing is good, and the undersea action is realistic throughout 
the J. Arthur Rank production released by Republic. The 
characters are very human — afraid but brave — with John 
Mills commanding three tiny subs through the Norwegian 
fjords to blow up a German battleship. One long flashback 
contributes little to the business at hand and could be cut 
to advantage. Director Ralph Thomas draws a full mea- 
sure of excitement as enemy bombs force the crews to 
abandon their subs. Mills outlines a plan to use midget 
subs to infiltrate a blockade of the Norwegian coast and 
sink a German battleship. His sub dashes through an 
underwater boom-gate into the fjord, while Gregson and 
Sinden cut their way through under-water wires. Two 
subs complete the mission, but upon surfacing, are cap- 
tured. The battleship is blown up. A second explosion in- 
dicates the fate of Gregson's craft which remained below 
until certain the mission was successful. 



"Istanbul" 

Familiar, but actionful, adventure meller. Interesting Cine- 
maScope-Technicolor locations. Errol Flynn for marquee. 

"Istanbul" offers little that is novel, but it does have 
ample adventure, intrigue, action and romance set against 
a CinemaScope and Technicolor background in an exotic 
locale. These ingredients, plus a lively pace and Errol 
Flynn and Cornell Borchers provides enough in the way of 
boxoffice values to make this Universal release an accept- 
able programmer in the general market. Director Joseph 
Pevney keeps Flynn on the go. Producer Albert J. 
Cohen has injected another exploitable note in Nat "King" 
Cole, who renders two torch songs, a la "Casablanca". 
Flynn, returning to Istanbul after serving in Korea, is un- 
able to get his former suite occupied by tourists Leif Erick- 
son and Peggy Knudsen. (While Nat Cole sings in the 
bar, story flashes back to Flynn who bought an engage- 
ment bracelet for Miss Borchers, discovered diamonds 
hidden in it. Smuggler Martin Benson, seeking his loot, 
burned down Miss Borchers' hotel, causing her to be an 
amnesia victim.) Flynn finds Miss Borchers, who doesn't 
recognize him, learns she's married to Torin Thatcher. 
Benson again trails Flynn for his diamonds and kidnaps 
Miss Borchers. Flynn burns the hideout to escape, and 
the shock restores Miss Borchers' memory. 



Universal-International. 84 minutes. Errol Flynn, Corne 
Produced by Albert J. Cohen. Directed by Joseph Pevnc 



Borchers, John 



"Wicked As They Come" 

Lurid melodrama about ruthless female. Good Continental 
backgrounds. For adults and fern trade. 

Arlene Dahl takes men for all they're worth after schem- 
ing her way out of the slums, where, as a young girl, she 
was severely violated. She makes the venomous female 
fairly convincing, despite some implausibilities, in this 
Maxwell Setton production for Columbia release. Oppo- 
site her are Phil Carey and Herbert Marshall. "Wicked As 
They Come" is designed for adults, and the "done-me- 
wrong" theme should attract the fern trade. This could de- 
velop into a "sleeper", if its exploitables are fully capital- 
ized. The screenplay by Ken Hughes from Bill Ballinger's 
novel, "Portrait in Smoke", is too transparent to be ac- 
cepted by discriminating audiences. Hughes, who also di- 
rected, makes ample use of Miss Dahl's beauty, as well as 
New York, London, and Paris gackgrounds. Factory- 
worker Miss Dahl plays up to elderly publisher David 
Kossoff, who "fixes" a beauty contest. She wins a trip to 
Europe and meets TV producer Carey, who is attracted to 
her. Michael Goodliffe, a photographer, falls for her and 
proposes, but after using his credit accounts in London 
shops, runs out on him. Marshall, Carey's boss, is her next 
conquest. Marshall's wife offers her a job in Paris as a 
payoff. Ralph Truman, Marshall's father-in-law and head 
of the firm, woos and weds her. When Goodliffe returns 
and threatens to expose her, Miss Dahl shoots and kills 
her husband. She is sentenced to death, but Carey makes 
Goodliffe confess, proving the murder was accidental. 

Columbia. 94 minutes. Arlene Dahl, Phil Carey, Herbert Marshall. Produced by 



[More REVIEWS on Page 12] 



CORPORATE POKER GAME— Loew's cards not wild, 
dike Todd couldn't have staged it better had he dusted off 

ihe old Last Chance Saloon and let his two mighty pro- 
agonists slug it out over a hand of 5-card draw. Bret 

Tarte and Cameron Hawley might have scripted the con- 
est with a contribution, perhaps from Von Clausewitz' 
ablets on tactics. 

1 All the dramatic elements were there in this two-handed 
orporate poker game between a couple of guys named 
oe : Vogel vs. Tomlinson. There was Vogel, the top gun 
ind Tomlinson, the outlander breathing threats to take 
>ver. And always in the background, the kibitzers, the re- 
nainder of the stockholding rabble, patently disenchanted 
vith existing authority, willing, anxious, to let the chal- 
enger have his say, but yet uncommitted. In them and 
he shift of the sentiment rested much of the outcome of 
he duel. 

Under this setting play commenced. 

Circumstances had delt the outlander the following 
land: a boasted equity of 250,000 shares (placed officially 
>y the S.E.C., however, at 180,000 shares) out of a total 
i.3 million Loew's share outstanding; a disgruntled stock- 
holding gentry; the power and capital to force a proxy 
ight; an issue consisting of an enduring slump in company 
:arnings; the very nervousness of management itself as 
witnessed by the resignation of certain key personnel. In 
he last named card, surprisingly, dwelt the weight of 
Tomlinson's power. Because of conditions allegedly pe- 
:uliar to Loew's, he thought he could see company officials 
>lanch at his charges of nepotism, favoritism and malfeas- 
mce in the discharge of office. Clearly, Mr. Tomlinson was 
naking his play in terms of personalities. 

O 

In the face of Tomlinson's power, Vogel's hand looked 
neager to the extreme. He held no aces save one: the 
;anctuary of appointed rank, which meant the outlander 
nust come to him and his cohorts to knock them off. 
Vogel's only other strength consisted of cards of inter- 
nediate value: his newness to the top post which sheltered 
iim from the charges of operational deficiences in the past, 
jlus his recorded promises to sweep clean. Paradoxically. 
Vogel's best chance rested in the play of the challenger's 
jame, so he settled down and let his opponent bet. 

Tomlinson jumped off with a demand for a revised di- 
rectors' slate, adding veiled threats of a proxy challenge if 
le be refused. 

[ With the chips so cast, Vogel began the long, arduous 
process of cerebrating, assessing, rationalizing, anticipat- 
ng — the results of which may have gone like this: 
TOMLINSON'S STRENGTH— 180,000 shares ... no 
aluff ... a matter of official record . . . Standing alone he 
:an be neutralized . . . more dangerous in his potential to 
itir up a bandwagon among fellow dissidents . . . Blows 
nard ; may be only moderately effective as a rallying point. 
REMAINING SHAREHOLDERS — Obviously dis- 
oleased with management . . . and perhaps rightly so . . . 
The record is clear . . . question is will they swallow line of 
lew leadership sincerely dedicated to righting the company 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 

JANUARY 2 1, 1957 



By Philip R. Ward 



. . . Worked for Arthur Loew year ago . . . May not buy 
this refrain again . . . but can Tomlinson organize them . . . 
They exist now as separate islands of resistance, mostly 
passive . . . Such groups generally work at cross-purposes 
. . . Must count on disorganization, disorganization ... No 
evidence Tomlinson their clear leader . . . besides little 
time, little time. 

PROXY FIGHT— Man talks of safe-guarding his invest- 
ment . . . but would he risk personal outlay of $100,000 and 
up to make proxy contest . . . chances are no under circum- 
stances . . . Less than two months to file, plan, print, mail, 
buttonhole and effectively congeal the scattered forces . . . 
Tomlinson too shrewd to gamble on fight with such medi- 
ocre probabilities . . . besides some groups sure to impugn 
his motives ... A certain bluff . . . knows management is 
on the defensive, thus is testing our hand ... to knuckle 
under may encourage him to make legitimate battle ... if 
not bluffing he could make it anyway . . . Best response a 
flat rejection on director demands ... on the other hand, 
may smack of arrogance to balance of shareholders and in- 
advertently tip them into his scale. 

LOEW'S EARNINGS— No defense possible other than 
declining condition of industry in general ... a weak ap- 
peal . . . Better grounds: a hopeful future. 
PERSONALITIES— Most ticklish and unpleasant . . . 
Company could not recover from a mud washing of senior 
personnel no matter who wins . . . sinecure-ridden or not, 
the company cannot stand the kleig light of a public recital 
. . . Tomlinson knows this well ... so do a number of other 
malcontents. 

O 

It was Mr. Vogel's play. Without changing expression 
he compressed his fan of cards into a neat rectangle and 
chucked them to the table — face down. Mr. Tomlinson's 
game. In so doing, Joe Vogel proved his mettle. He proved 
his mastery of the most difficult points in poker: the fine 
science of quitting when the cards are running bad, and 
the even finer science of containing his losses. Consciously 
or unconsciously, he obeyed the cardinal injunction of the 
economist's Theory of Games: that of maximizing gains, 
minimizing losses by choosing the so-called "optimum" 
course. In short, he expended little in relation to what he 
managed to hold. 

By wringing the right to approve new directors along 
with Tomlinson, loser Vogel may have actually bested the 
apparent winner. For in the new complement of directors, 
though they appear solid citizens all, Loew's, Inc. shall be 
piloted by a board whose ignorance of filmdom affairs is 
second to none in the industry. It could be that what re- 
mains of the much abused Loew's management team will 
be called upon to supply most of the guidance. 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 7 



ONE IN A SERIES OF ADS FOR AN UNUSUAL AND VERY DIFFERENT MOTION PICTU 



THE INCREDIBLE 

Shrinking MA 




EXCT 
COM PAN 



DIRECTED BY JACK ARNOLD • SCREENPLAY BY RICHARD MATHESON • PRODUCED BY ALBERT ZUGSMITH 



WHAT IS THE MOVIEGOER'S AGE. SEX. TASTE'! 1 
THE THEATHEMAN SHOULD KNOW HES CUSTOMER 

Patterns of Patronage 

[ CxcluAiU e ^BULLETIN Jeature 



by LEONARD SPINRAD 
Counting the house is an ancient and honorable preoccu- 
pation of the motion picture industry. At times, however, 
it may be that audiences need "casing" as well as counting. 

The focus of all the concerted effort of the motion pic- 
ture industry is a window in a small cubicle, which a man, 
woman or child approaches with money in hand. The 
emphasis has always been on the number of people at the 
boxoffice, rather than what kind of people and in what pro- 
portion. 

Customers come, of course, in all shapes, sizes, races, 
creeds, ages and the standard set of sexes. But some ages 
and one sex go more frequently than the others. Indeed, 
there seems to be a very discernible pattern of moviegoing 
available from the handful of studies which have been con- 
ducted. 

This pattern is not just an interesting conversational 
sidelight for an industry which sells its wares over and 
over again to its customers. The profile of patronage can 
be a guide to every phase of motion picture operations 
from the studio story department to the theatre boxoffice. 

While national statistical studies of attendance have 
been made with a highly regarded degree of accuracy and 
on a continuing basis in recent years, there has not been as 
much attention paid to the composition of the audience. 
We know how many people attend better than we know 
what kind of people. The profile of the customer has been 
less thoroughly pursued. Some of the customer studies 
and surveys have been made by or for theatre circuits; 
some have been made as part of larger research undertak- 
ings for magazines or newspapers. Some have been carried 
on by individual theatre men. 

It would be manifestly unfair to try to combine all these 
various efforts into one over-all statistical summary; but 
by assembling and comparing the conclusions of the vari- 
ous surveys, we can get a better picture of the average mo- 
tion picture John Q. Public. 



THE MOVIEGOING AGE 



National Theatres made a study of the patrons of six 
neighborhood houses in Los Angeles in 1955. The two 
largest age groupings were 21-30 years old (41% of the 
total) and 31-40 years old (21.9%). Other age group per- 
centages were 7.7% in the up-to-14 age bracket, 16.3% in 
the 12-20-year-old group, 7.5% in the 41-50 area, 3.4% 
aged 51-60 and 1% over 60. 

Back in 1951, on the basis of a big movie quiz contest 
conducted by 123 Detroit theatres, it was stated that the 
average "actively interested" patron was about 40 years 
old. 

A single-picture audience check in Rochester, N. Y. a 
bit more than a year ago, the picture being "Indian Fight- 
ers," turned up the 21-35 age group as the largest, with the 
35-50-year-olds second and teenagers last. The same pro- 
portion was reported in another Rochester test involving 
"Three Stripes in the Sun". 

A 1956 survey for Look magazine by Alfred Poiitz Re- 
search, Inc., found that the peak motion picture attendance 
group was aged 20-29, with the 15-19 and 10-14 groups 
virtually tied as next best. These three groups, according 
to Poiitz, accounted for more than half of the total movie 
audience above the age of 10 during the month of Febru- 
ary 1956. (Politz's survey was confined to moviegoers ten 
years old or older.) 

There are plenty of reasons for challenging, if you so 
choose, the accuracy of one or more of the aforementioned 
surveys. But it is perhaps more productive to put them to- 
gether and try to derive some fairly unanimous conclusions. 

Beyond a doubt, all the cited surveys point to the 20- 
thirtyish age group as the top single bracket. Whether this 
extends into the forties is, to judge by the differences in the 
various figures, a moot point. As for the teenagers, they 
would appear to be a strong but secondary audience group. 
(In the Elma Theatre in Elma, Iowa, possibly not typical 
because it is such a small town, with a population of under 

(Continued on Page 10) 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 9 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE 



JfonV« Provitlf ll<>livH frnm Tvnsions 



(Continued from Page 9) 

1,000, exhibitor Charlie Jones made a month-long survey 
which showed that 25% of his total audience had been 
teen-agers, but 58% of the audience or more was older.) 

The core of the audience is then to be regarded as 20-35, 
with the next strongest groups at both ends of this age 
spectrum. Politz has the highest noted percentage for the 
teen-agers. 



THE MOVIEGOING SEX 



Until a few years ago, it had been generally assumed 
that more women than men went to the movies, and that 
the women picked the pictures when they went with men. 
So far as I know, nobody yet has come up with a reliable 
and completely provable story about who picks the pic- 
tures, husband or wife, but there are some statistics on the 
composition of the audience. 

The Willmark Service System checked patrons in 33 
cities last year and came up with patronage figures of 
48.5% women and 51.5% men. A couple of months later 
Sindlinger and Company reported that previous propor- 
tions had now been reversed and the national movie audi- 
ence was now composed of 60% men and 40% women. 
While the exact percentages have not been constant, the 
preponderance of male attendance has been fairly continu- 
ous in the Sindlinger reports. Elma's Charlie Jones did not 
break down his audience study by sex in every age group, 
but his figures match the rest (where he used sex as the 
criterion) : 23% of his month's audience were women, 26% 
were men. 



MOVIEGOING CONSIDERATIONS 



A number of intrepid investigators have attempted to 
find out what influences a customer to go to the movies. 
This is a very difficult area of exploration. In the first 
place, moviegoers don't always know themselves why they 
chose to go to a particular movie — or even to the movies in 
general. In the second place, people don't always tell the 
truth when they are asked to give their reasons. (This is 
particularly the case with pictures whose attractions in- 
clude sexy girls, for example.) But, admitting these diffi- 
culties, let us proceed to the data at hand. 

The previously mentioned Willmark survey said that 
90.2% of the women gave escaping from nervous tension 
as their main reason for moviegoing, while 80.2% of the 
men gave a similar reason. In 1954 American theatres 
Corp. conducted interviews at 300 homes near one of its 
New England theatres on a related subject and found that 
the principal reason for attending a particular theatre was 
because it was nearby. Out of the total survey, 215 homes 
gave this answer. 

If these two fragmentary reports are to be considered as 
indicative, the prime attractions for moviegoing, then, are 
escape from real problems and the nearness of the theatre. 



Obviously, a prime attraction can overcome the indicated 
inertia of the moviegoer; a hot enough picture will draw its 
patronage from a larger area than the immediate environs. 
But this is the exception to the general rule. 

A further symptom can be found in a 1955 poll conducted 
by the National Theatres circuit among 16-20-year-olds. 
The chief type of picture preferred by the 16-20-year-olds 
was the musical, followed closely by comedy. As recent 
business has perhaps confirmed, Westerns were at the 
bottom of the ratings. Musicals and comedies, together or 
separately, must certainly be classified as prime escapist 
material. (So too are Westerns, but not on the same enter- 
tainment level.) 

It may be significant that the American Theatres Corp. 
survey, conducted at a morning hour when teen-agers 
would not usually be home, the teen-age National Theatres 
poll and the general Willmark investigation seem to point 
to the same general conclusions. 



THE MOVIEGOING RATE 



Weekly total motion picture attendance figures are not 
necessarily truly reflective of the number of people who go 
to the movies. One of the big problems for the industry is 
to determine how often the same people go to the movies, 
and how often certain classes of people do not go. 

Amercian Theatres found that 111 of its 300 respondents 
went once a week, and 23 twice a week, a response frankly 
out of proportion to the total national weekly attendance. 
On the other hand, the Milwaukee Journal made a study of 
6,000 families in its area and discovered that only 10.4% of 
these families had a member who had attended a movie in 
the past week, while 29.4% of the families said none of 
their people had gone to the movies in over a year. Sind- 
linger's figures have indicated that about 10% of the people 
who go to the movies each week go twice, instead of just 
once. 

The significance of these reports, different as they are, 
lies in their very difference. The American Theatres sur- 
vey was made in a lower middle class residential area with- 
in a mile of the theatre, in a city of some 100,000 popula- 
tion. The Milwaukee Journal report was based on 6,000 
replies from all income classes and from all parts of the 
Milwaukee area. 

This helps to point up a pattern. The pattern is stressed 
by the Milwaukee findings that non-downtown houses in 
Milwaukee draw a growing share of the audience. The 
moviegoing rate, it appears from both studies, is influence 
by the closeness of the theatre and the level of economic 
life. The rate seems to be higher as the economic class 
goes lower, although there is no available study of movie- 
going among the urban or rural poor. The lower middle 
class, in any case, seems to be inclined to go more often 
than the upper middle class. The rate of moviegoing also 
seems to go higher as the location of the theatre gets 



Page 10 Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE 



Hit bull's Problems Sim tin r in Ours 



m closer. (Whether this also applies to the drive-ins is not 
| yet adequately documented, but an educated guess sug- 

\ gests that location is definitely a customer attraction.) 
t Some surveys, notably one by Alfred Politz in 1955, have 
shown college people as high on the list of moviegoers. 

1 There is no great body of statistics in this field, and cer- 

; tainly insufficient either to prove or disprove the point. 

AJilJM.IUI.M.IIHca.llJJMIHJIJJ 

The New England lower middle class group said, in the 
. relatively few instances where they gave reasons for not 
I going to the movies, that they had baby sitter trouble, they 
I could watch television, or the prices at the theatre were 
too high — in that order. A National Theatres survey listed 
I the prime difficulties as night work, school homework, no 
I money, "married", children, a few mentions of television 
1 and only 15 out of 936 questionnaires which spoke of "bad 
i movies". In a Los Angeles poll by the same circuit prior 
to the national survey mentioned above, 38% of the pa- 
Ktrons whose interest in movies had declined blamed it on 
I television. It is generally felt that the competitive impact 
of TV has softened with the passage of time. 

It is of some interest in this connection to consider the 
first report released a year and a half ago about Baseball 
Commissioner Ford C. Frick's survey of the audience for 
the national pastime. The reasons given for non-attend- 
iance at major league baseball games were these: difficulty 
. in parking cars and reaching the ball park ; ability to watch 
the games on television; high cost of tickets; games last 
S too long. Food for thought there, surely. 

Here then is a sketchy portrait of that king of the 
movies, the great American customer. The customer is 
more likely than not to be a male in his twenties or thirties, 
lower middle class in income, living not too far from a the- 
1 atre he attends, and attending at a rate from once a week 
! to once a month. 

One glaring omission in this sketchy picture immediate- 
! ly suggests itself. Few if any of the various published in- 
. vestigations to date have explored the size or composition 



of the moviegoing unit. Are more people than formerly 
going to the movies alone? Are more children going with 
their parents, and less by themselves? Are more fathers 
than mothers, or more fathers than formerly, taking the 
kids to the theatre? 

Certainly nothing in this article is to be regarded as 
cinematic gospel. This is merely a report on what has thus 
far been stated, concluded or implied about our audience. 

One of the most insistent conclusions of our inquiry 
must be that the body of data is worth enlarging. It is 
safe to say that many theatre customer surveys have been 
made and kept quiet, even though the facts elicited in these 
surveys might be of general industry interest. It is also 
safe to say that many theatres which might benefit from 
taking a close analytical look at their own customers still 
have not gotten around to this basic marketing function. 

The establishment and exchange of data about motion 
picture customers has never been a major enthusiasm of 
the industry as a whole, even though a start has been made 
with testing of ads and picture popularity or awareness. 
But many, many facets of the audience deserve special at- 
tention. Even systematic recording of the proportion of 
age groups a manager notes in the lobby during the run of 
a picture can be helpful "research", if enough records are 
kept and enough managers are willing to make their find- 
ings known. 

What is the story, for example, on teen-agers and the 
movies? How have the reduced rate ticket cards worked, 
is there any relationship — any consistent relationship — be- 
tween juvenile delinquency problems in the theatre and 
the economic level of the neighborhood or city? 

What about the oldsters? What has been the effect of 
the various plans to boost their attendance? How often do 
they go, and what seems to influence their moviegoing 
most? How big is this market group? 

Plenty of questions remain to be explored. The impor- 
tant thing at the moment is that, even when we broad- 
jump to generalized conclusions, we take as close a look as 
possible at the man who pays the bill — the customer. 



SHOWMEN. . . 
What Are YOU Doing? 

Send us your advertising, publicity and exploitation 
campaigns — with photos — for inclusion in our 
EXPLOITATION & MERCHANDISING DEPARTMENT 



"The Barretts of Wimpole Street" 

Scidutet* &ati*$ O O Plus 

New version of oft-done classic. First-rate production values 
plus Jennifer Jones for marquee. For class houses. 

The classic love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett and 
Robert Browning, from the modern stage classic by Rudolf 
Besier, has been re-created in CinemaScope and Metro- 
color by M-G-M. Boxofnce prospects are questionable, 
figuring good for class houses, not so good in the mass 
market. Filmed once before (in 1934) by M-G-M, "The 
Barretts" has been standard fare in the theatre for years 
and was only recently done on TV. Jennifer Jones and 
John Gielgud, as Elizabeth and her fanatically domineer- 
ing father, turn in top-drawer performances, but Bill 
("Wee Geordie") Travers tends to overplay the Browning 
role. Virginia McKenna, as younger sister, shines like a 
new penny. Sam Zimbalist's handsome production, filmed 
in England, offers some wonderful Victorian settings in 
the Barrett mansion and London parks. The screenplay by 
John Dighton concentrates on character, the bittersweet 
romance, and tender Browning poetry. Direction by Sid- 
ney Franklin is subtle. Under Gielgud's stern rule, his 
three daughters and six sons are forbidden courtship and 
marriage. Miss Jones, a bedridden invalid, has only letters 
from poet Robert Browning (whom she has never met) to 
spark her feeble life. Travers (as Browning) begins mak- 
ing regular visits, and she undergoes an amazing recovery. 
Doctors pronounce her well enough to travel to Italy, but 
Gielgud refuses permission. Nevertheless, Travers makes 
plans to marry Miss Jones, but she hesitates until her 
father betrays a love for her that is unnatural. The couple 
run off and marry. 

M-G-M. 105 minutes. Jennifer Jones, John Gielgud Bill Travers. Produced by 
Sam Zimbalist. Directed by Sidney Franklin. 

"Oasis" 

Adventure-intrigue in Moroccan locale has much fury, 
meager plot. CinemaScope, color will attract action fans. 

International smuggling, murder and some striking 
Eastman color backgrounds of Morocco in CinemaScope 
are the high points of this dualler being released by 20th- 
Fox. The story, revolving around beautiful spies Michele 
Morgan and Cornell Borchers who lure North African 
trader Pierre Brasseur, follows a tried and trite formula. 
The confusing action keeps shifting suspicion until the 
very last reel. Amateurly produced by Luggi Wald- 
leitner and Gerd Oswald, "Oasis" will have to take the 
lower billing in action sub-runs. Aside from the plot weak- 
nesses, the English dubbing is distracting. Former pilot 
Brasseur, owner of an oasis, is suspected of smuggling 
gold. Morgan and Borchers are hired by gunman Gregoire 
Asian to spy on him, but Miss Borchers falls for him and 
plans to join his forces. Miss Morgan, also in love with 
Brasseur, learns he is to be murdered by smugglers, re- 
turns to warn him. Miss Borchers turns against Brasseur 
and informs the smugglers. The smugglers close in, but 
Brasseur stampedes their gold-laden camels by flying low 
in bis plane. Borchers and Asian are trampled to death. 

20th Century-Fox. 84 minutes. Michele Morgan, Pierre Brasseur, Cornell Borchers. 
Produced by Luggi Waldleitner & Gerd Oswald. Directed by Yves Allegret. 



"The Iron Petticoat" 

ScuiHCM 7£<tf£K? O O Plus 

Bob Hope, Katharine Hepburn labor with weak material in 
spoof of "cold war". Returns will depend on stars' appeal. 

"The Iron Petticoat" boasts two good boxofnce names, 
but their material is quite disappointing. Air Force flyer 
Bob Hope is assigned to convert the ideologies of Russian 
aviatrix Katharine Hepburn but, naturally, he finds her 
physical attributes more challenging. That is the "gim- 
mick" of this attempted spoof of communism and the "cold 
war". Produced in England by Betty Box for M-G-M re- 
lease, with Vista Vision and Technicolor as additional plus 
factors, the action moves fast enough, but too often 
without the expected comic effect. Most of all, it is a Hope 
"vehicle", the glib comedian being given all the best of the 
script by Ben Hecht (which he publicly disclaimed). Miss 
Hepburn babbles Soviet doctrines in a thick slavic accent, 
but manages to be only mildly amusing. Director Ralph 
Thomas turns to outlandish slapstick whenever the plot 
sags. When Miss Hepburn flees to the West, Hope is as- 
signed by Alan Gifford to indoctrinate her with democratic 
ways. Miss Hepburn, politically adamant, is attracted to 
Hope, who takes her to London where he want to wed 
wealthy Miss Noelle Middleton. Russian agents led by 
James Robertson Justice kidnap Miss Hepburn. Hope, 
disguised as Russian pilot, boards the Moscow-bound 
plane and they are met in Moscow with a "new political 
climate". Hepburn is a hero for converting Hope and they 
receive a plane as gift, return to the West to marry. 

M-G-M. 87 minutes. Bob Hope, Katharine Hepburn, James R. Justice. Produced 
by Betty Box. Directed by Ralph Thomas. 

"Mister Cory" 

Sci4iH€44. IZatOu} O O Plus 

Familiar story about young gambler's rise from slums to 
riches. Tony Curtis stars. Adequate programmer. 

Poor boy Tony Curtis makes good as an "honest" gam- 
bler and tangles with no-good rich girl, Martha Hyer, in 
this routine romance-action melodrama. Robert Arthur's 
production for Universal-International makes good use of 
CinemaScope and Eastman Color to capture some interest- 
ing backgrounds, but the yarn (screenplay by Blake Ed- 
wards from story by Leo Rosten) is pretty much "old hat". )i 
Curtis does a fairly convincing job. Miss Hyer and 
Kathryn Grant are attractive fern foils, and Charles Bick- 
ford is solid as the veteran gambler. "Mister Cory" should 
serve well as a top dualler, especially in the action houses. 
Edwards also directed, with most of the cliches intact. 
Slum-born Curtis works as bus boy at a swank resort to || 
make contacts with guests. He meets Miss Hyer through |i 
her sister, Miss Grant, who makes it plain she likes Curtis. I 
When Miss Hyer discovers Curtis washing dishes she | 
breaks off the romance. Curtis teams up with veteran :] 
gambler Bickford and Chicago underworld kingpin Russ \\ 
Morgan backs them in a gambling club. When Miss Hyer I 
visits with her fiance, William Reynolds, Curtis wins her i 
back, but she refuses to marry him. Reynolds learns about 
the affair, wounds Curtis in a showdown. Curtis leaves on lj 
vacation with Bickford, promising to return to Miss Grant, \\ 

Universal-International. 92 minutes. Tony Curtis. Martha Myer Charles Bickford, 
Kathryn Grant. Produced by Robert Arthur. Directed by Blake Edwards. 



Page 12 Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 



MERCHANDISING & 



ALL-INDUSTRY PROMOTION 
PROGRAM CLOSE TO REALITY 



The long-awaited all-industry promotion 
:ompaign, in various stages of planning dur- 
ng recent months, seems to be on the way 
o finalization with the representatives of 
he Council of Motion Picture Organizations, 
he Motion Picture Association of America, 
studio publicity chiefs and the national ex- 
hibitor groups all voicing approval of the 
proposed Academy Award "Sweepstakes" 
plan. As proposed, the nation-wide contest 
tied to the Oscar Awards will be conducted 
from February 19 through March 26, the 
period between the "Oscar" nominations and 
the awards. While official approval is still 
awaited, all principal elements in the council 
have individually indicated assent. The 
Sweepstakes idea is to have movie patrons 
vote on 13 of the 33 Academy Award cate- 
gories, with prizes promoted by the theatres 
going to those who come closest to the 
Oscar" winners in those categories. 
Other facets of the industrywide institu- 
tional program were blueprinted at meetings 
held in New York City last week. A plan- 
ning committee has been set up to develop 
an over-all business building program incor- 
porating the best features of the MPAA, 
COMPO-TOA and other plans put forward 
by representatives of these groups. COM- 
PO's members on this committee include 
Harry Mandel, Harry Goldberg, Ernest 

Musical Midnight Show 
Touted by Commonwealth Chain 

Commonwealth's "Messenger", house 
organ of the midwest circuit, suggests a dif- 
ferent angle for a midnight show. A "Musi- 
cal Midnight Show", featuring an all-musical 
program is the idea, topped by a film like 
"The Glenn Miller Story" or "The Eddy 
Duchin Story", and a host of musical shorts 
to complete the bill. 

The showmanship publication recommends 
a co-op with a local disc jockey and record 
shop to help make the boxoffice sing a merry 
tune — with plenty of high notes. Build up 
the promotion by featuring the platter spin- 
ner doing his program from your lobby, and 
to patrons of the musical show you might 
present coupons good for discounts on wax- 
ings at the participating record store. 



Emerling and Charles E. McCarthy. This 
group will report back to the over-all com- 
mittee next week. 

One of the plans expected to catch the im- 
agination of the industry representatives is 
the showmanship idea developed by Alice 
Gorham, publicity director of United Detroit 
Theatres, who has come up with a promo- 
tional plum known as the "Hollywood Hall 
of Fame". Following the line of reasoning 
that Baseball and Football have hit a public 
relations jackpot with their "hall of fame" 
setups, the Michigan show-woman ran a 
pilot poll at Detroit's Michigan Theatre to 
test public response to her idea. Reaction to 
the Gorham plan was very favorable. Pa- 
trons of the UDT house were confronted 
with two striking displays upon entering the 
theatre: one featuring a variety of male stars; 
the other, an equally good variety of ac- 
tresses. Theatregoers were requested to select 
their favorites for a "Hollywood Hall of 
Fame". 

Also in line for close scrutinization are the 
Audience Awards program and a celebration 
of the Golden Jubilee of Motion Pictures, the 
50th anniversary of the first motion picture 
produced in Hollywood. 




-A- Down New Orleans way sultry, Shawnee 
Smith puts in a pair of hefty plugs — one for the 
March of Dimes, the other for Columbia's 
"Zarak", playing at the Orpheum. 



To, THE PEOPLE OF THE CJTY 
OF BUFFALO 

In Iho matter of i 

"R1FIFI" 



g>umtttnttB 



fou arr hrrrby 

ol on» of tht mat ipoctocutor ,«»•/ robboriti i 
poop/, of tuffofo. Thh oction will iok, plan daily, or iho CINEMA THEATRE 
Storting JHUKDAY. Failuto to apptor will muff In Iho farfoit ol your opportunity to 
b» p„„m ai ih, iftowrng of o motl f motional now motion pictvro "RIPIFi" 
IMPORTANT ! rtocovu ol Iho o.froordinory noiuto ol "RIPIFI" no on* will 
bo Motod during tho Ipri noil hour. Hoot* obiorro Iho h 
toroto/fy. Footoro Daily at 1 45. 3.15, 5.25. 7,40 t 9,50 



« Jim Hayes, manager 
of the Cinema Theatre 
in Buffalo, N.Y. "sum- 
moned" patrons to his 
theatre with this clever 
postcard gimmick when 
"Rififi" played there. 




Sid White Named to Head 
Warners' TV-Radio Publicity 

Meyer M. Hutner, national publicity di- 
rector of Warner Bros., announced the ap- 
pointment of Sid White to handle the film 
company's over-all television-radio activities. 
His chief function will be the promotion of 
Warners' films and personalities via the two 
air mediums as well as publicization of 
WB's TV shows, "Cheyenne" and "Conflict". 

White formerly handled TV placements 
on the WB account for the Blaine-Thompson 
advertising agency. He had previously been 
a movie and radio trade paper writer. 

Spiegel on Talent Hunt 

Producer Sam Spiegel has launched a 
talent search for a young actor, who is "vide 
but not aggressive, sensitive but not effemi- 
nate" to fill a key role in his new film, "The 
Bridge On The River Kwai", now being shot 
in the jungles of Ceylon. 

Because of the tight production schedule, 
the successful applicant must be on the job 
by January 25. Because of the time limita- 
tion, Spiegel will concentrate on auditioning 
New York and Hollywood actors. The vet- 
eran producer says the part is such a sure- 
fire star builder that the talent search win- 
ner will be optioned for starring roles in 
future Horizon Productions. 



[More SHOWMEN on Page 16] 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 13 



EXPLOITATION PICTURE 



Get The Opinion-Makers Behind This One! 



Every so often a picture comes along bear- 
ing intrinsic hallmarks of distinction not 
readily apparent from the title, cast, credits 
or advance publicity. Yet it is packed with 
entertainment values that are certain to ap- 
peal to all who like dramatic meat in their 
movies — and to make them tell their world 
to go see it! Such a movie is "Three Brave 
Men", based on the Pulitzer Prize articles 
by Anthony Lewis, written for the screen 
and directed by Philip Dunne for producer 
Herbert B. Swope, Jr., under the 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox banner. 

There is one prerequisite incumbent on 
every showman worthy of the name — let the 
public generally know about this movie and 
get opinion makers, particularly, to spread 
the word about it. 20th-Fox has based a 
concentrated campaign on these two require- 
ments pegged on two fountainheads of word- 
of-mouth — stimulating advertising and wide- 
spread screenings. 

The special screening campaign is one of 
the biggest 20th has undertaken for a pic- 
ture of this type. Before it runs its present 
course of nationwide showings, more than 
50,000 community opinion makers, exhibitors 
and press people in 34 major cities will have 
seen the CinemaScope drama, each of them 
sending word rippling out among their con- 
stituents, members, readers and viewers that 
here is a picture not to miss. The types of 
organizations invited to send their repre- 
sentatives to view the film: Council of 
Churches, Parent-Teacher Associations, 
American Civil Liberties Union, Federation 
of Women's Clubs. Typical comments: 
"This is the finest picture of its nature that 
I have ever seen and I will urge all my 
constituents to see this picture and tell their 
friends about it." — Luther K. MacNair, ex- 
ecutive director, American Civil Liberties 
Union; ". . . Never forgettable struggle for 
true freedom for mankind. I hope that we 
can be of some beneficial service to the thea- 
tre when 'Three Brave Men' will open" — 
Mrs. R. Griffiths, president, Boston Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs. 

While Fox is sponsoring the screenings in 
the key cities, there is still ample room for 
individual showmen to set up showings for 
community talk-it-uppers outside of the key 
areas. Since the picture deals with a dra- 
matic miscarriage of justice that is contro- 
verted by the bravery of individuals who 
risk their own reputations to save an inno- 
cent man from being branded a Commu- 
nist, it carries, along with the emotional im- 
pact, a significance that hits every communal 
organization leader where he or she lives 
and makes them a walkie-talkie ad for the 
film. Showmen who take the opportunity to 
set up local screenings will be performing a 
double service — boosting the picture's box- 
office and ingratiating their theatre with the 
town's top people. 

On the advertising front, 20th has un- 
corked a series of factually teasing, hard- 



hitting newspaper ads that smack out at the 
thinking audience, pique the interest of those 
who are content to just sit back and be 
entertained, as well. From the teasers on this 
page to the display ads opposite, the cam- 
paign subtly encompasses the whole of the 
moviegoing audience (and lots who don't 
usually go). Every illustration, every line of 
copy is a dramatic punch softening up the 
public for the actual viewing coup d'etat. An 
added sock is the line: "Find out WHY their 
story had to win the Pulitzer Prize!", toss- 
ing out the undoubted lure to the discrimi- 
nating with this distinguished honor. 

There will be, possibly, those who will 
feel that the picture leans too far in its heart- 
felt cry for human rights. A touch of this 
will hardly be unwelcome since it will bring 
in controversy, a magic boxoffice word con- 
juring up so much more talk about the film. 

This, then, is the showman's peg: let 'em 
know with the ads and the screenings, get 
'em talking and let the picture's strong enter- 
tainment values do the rest. 




TEASER ADS 



THREE 
BRAVE MEN 

The name of Abraham Chasanow 
will bring back few flickers of mem- 
ory in the average American, even 
though his story is still warm in the 
newspaper morgues. Two of those, 
however, who saw in it the kind of 
drama that reaches into every Ameri- 
can's life are Anthony Lewis, a writer, 
and Herbert B. Swope, Jr., a movie 
producer. Lewis esconced Chasa- 
now's story into fame with a series of 
articles that won the writer a Pulitzer 
Prize; Swope has made a movie of 
that story that has already started 
talk about "bests" for 1957. It stars 
Ernest Borgnine as the Navy Depart- 
ment employee who sees his 22-year 
service with the Government blasted 
into bits by charges of "Red", Ray 
Milland as the attorney who puts his 
reputation and career on the chop- 
ping block of prejudice by defending 
Borgnine, and features distinguished 
performances by Dean Jagger, who 
weighs his duty as an Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Navy to preserve securi- 
ty against the rights of the individual 
to work and live with honor; Frank 
Lovejoy, Nina Foch, Virginia Christine 
and Frank Faylen in sterling perform- 
ances. As the film unfolds, the details 
will come back — Borgnine's suspen- 
sion as a security risk by Jagger when 
he is charged with communist associ- 
ations; the abuse he and his family 
receive in their home and at school as 
the innocent man dazedly sees his 
world crumbling; the brilliant defense 
by lawyer Milland, who brings faith- 
ful, undaunted neighbors and friends, 
to testify for the accused, resulting in 
his clearing by a hearing board; the 
double blow when Jagger overrules 
the board and terminates Borgnine's 
job; Milland's tenacious appeal for a 
re-investigation, uncovering the web 
prejudice and hysteria that brought 
the charges, and the courageous pub- 
lic apology and reinstatement by 
Jagger. It's a story — and a picture 
— to remember. 



Page 14 Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 



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Film BULLETIN January 21, 1 957 Page 15 



r 



Strong Word-of-Mouth Drives 
Sell Films Sans B.O. Headliners 

20th, Metro and RKO each are selling 
current releases via strong word-of-mouth 
drives to counter the absence of king-size 
pre-production reputations or pack-em-in 
boxoffice names. In a vigorous effort to 
stir up interest in "Three Brave Men" 
(20th), "Edge of the City" (MGM) and 
"The Young Stranger" (RKO), the three 
distributors are pushing these films through 
extensive screenings for and interviews 
among opinion-makers, with the aim of get- 
ting the pictures off the ground quickly on 
advance word-of-mouth impetus from promi- 
nent people. 

The 20th campaign on "Three Brave 
Men", patterned after the highly successful 
w-of-m build-up on "A Man Called Peter", 
has reached more than 50,000 community 
leaders from such organizations as the Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs and the United 
Church Women, who saw the film in a host 
of key cities. 

The Metro push for "City" has concen- 
trated on screenings for "influential people" 
in the New York area, coupled with inter- 
views and visits to opinion-moulders by key 
personalities such as David Susskind, pro- 
ducer of the film. 

Aiming principally at the teen-age set, 
RKO is running a series of contests for 
members of high school newspapers and 
journalism students. Students are shown 
"Stranger", then write reviews, the best re- 
view being honored in the school paper. 

Movie Popularity Contest 
Vigorous Boxoffice Stimulant 

North of the border in Canada, the Toron- 
to Star Weekly is running a promotion on 
motion pictures that has scads of people 
reading, thinking, talking motion pictures. 
Boasting a circulation of over 950,000 the 
Canadian paper is running a Movie Populari- 
ty Poll to find Canada's three top motion 
pictures of 1956 and the favorite trio of 
actors and actresses. $1,000 in cash will be 
the prize to reader whose guess comes 
closest to the final poll results. 

Needless to say, the virtual flood of free 
publicity coverage is making Canadian cir- 
cuits and independent theatre owners jump 
with joy for this potent p.r. lift. For their 
part, Dominion showmen are contributing 
two hundred double season passes to be 
given away to winners in the movie popu- 
larity contest. 

In addition to devoting $10,000 of free 
space to the promotion, the Star Weekly is 
spending plenty more via direct mail pieces, 
posters and displays. The newspaper ad- 
vised every theatreman in Canada of the 
Movie Popularity Poll via letter soliciting 
their participation in the campaign. All par- 
ticipating theatres received a one-sheet out- 
lining details of the contest to be used for 
display purposes. 




•T^GET THE 100T| 

pi 



Admiral ** 

BIG W POBTA»U TV k! 





-■V A trio of UA's exploiteers came up with -tfe- 
some top promotions on "The King and Four 
Queens". Top to bottom: 1 ) In Cincinnati, Bill 
Shirley placed a safe in front of the Palace The- 
atre with the person dialing the right combo 
snaring a portable TV set. 2) Another Shirley 
gimmick had a live "king and queen" passing out 
cards from a specially numbered deck for a con- 
test stunt. 3) San Francisco ballyman "Tiger" 
Thompson sent a K and 4 C*s on a shopping dis- 
trict tour. 4) St. Louis fieldman Bill Gandall ar- 
ranged a neat stunt for a KSD program by hav- 
ing a teenage press agent Betty Creech throw 
the spotlight on Clark Gable. 



Italo-American Market Target 
of WOV-Columbia PR Promotion 

In a sock public relations promotion aimed 
at the Italian-American market, radio sta- 
tion WOV of New York City and Columbia 
Pictures have joined hands to hypo interest 
in "Full of Life", Columbia's new comedy 
starring Judy Holliday, Richard Conte and 
Salvatore Baccoloni. Long acknowledged as 
the nation's leading Italian-language kilo- 
watter, WOV, in an attempt to batter the 
Italian stereotype, will plug the Fred Kohl- 
mar production on all levels as "a film which 
shows definitely how story and comedy 
values can be extracted from an Italian- 
American situation with offense to no one". 

For the use of Italian media everywhere, 
WOV has prepared a special kit of material 
to be used by Columbia exploiteers and local 
exhibitors. The N. Y. station is sending out 
batches of transcribed interviews to Italian- 
language outlets in every nook of the nation 
featuring Conte, Baccaloni and other sup- 
porting players. In addition, WOV is spon- 
soring a series of screenings for civic, re- 
ligious and organizational leaders of the 
Italo-American community in N. Y., Boston 
and Chicago. 

Idea-ed by Columbia's Jonas Rosenfield, 
Jr., the promotion is scoring a public rela- 
tions bulls-eye, with waves of enthusiastic 
comment coming in from notables all over 
the nation. "Full of Life" is apparently well- 
regarded by those who are sensitive to the 
flood of biased representations of first and 
second generation Italians in films, on tele- 
vision and radio, and in the press. 

Explaining the WOV decision to help Co- 
lumbia sell the film in the lush Italian mar- 
ket, Ralph Weil, general manager of the sta- 
tion stated: ". . . 'Full of Life' is going to 
make a lot of friends for Italian-Americans. 
We want to encourage this kind of thing, 
and have told Columbia we will do whatever 
we can to get the word around." 

Campaign Contest Set for 
'Big Land' St. Loo-K. C. Booking 

Three lucky and hard-working theatre 
managers in the Kansas City-St. Louis area 
are going to be gifted with $100 Savings 
Bonds from Warner Bros, for setting up the 
"sellingest" advertising and exploitation 
campaigns in their engagements of "The 
Big Land", Alan Ladd starrer which kicks 
off a saturation booking campaign in over 
250 Missouri theatres on January 31. 

Theatremen participating in the campaign 
have been asked by WB to compile scrap- 
books documented by photos, newspaper 
clippings, and all other pertinent material. 
Entries should be sent to W. W. Blumberg, 
Warner Bros., 321 W. 44th Street, New York 
36, N. Y. To be judged by staffers at the 
WB home office, the contest will be divided 
into three segments, with bonds being 
awarded for the best campaign by a manager 
in (1) a city with a population of over 50,- 
000; (2) in a city of not less than 5,000 nor 
more than 50,000; (3) in a city with less than | 
5,000 population. Closing date for entries is 
March 15. 



Page U Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




VOGEL 



JOSEPH R. VOGEL, president Loew's, 
Inc., and his associates in the company's 
management, in a move to ward off a 
proxy fight, last week agreed upon a slate 
of 13 directors which are reportedly ac- 
ceptable to the leaders of dissident stock- 
holders. This slate will be submitted for 
election at the annual stockholders meet- 
ing Feb. 28. The upheaval in the Loew's 
board was made to pacify a group of 
stockholders headed by Joseph R. Tom- 
linson, holder of some 180,000 shares, who 
has charged management with nepotism 
and favoritism, and had threatened a 
fight for control. The new board nomi- 
nated comprise six proposed by company 
management and seven presumably 
offered by Tomlinson's group. Lehman 
Brothers and Lazard Freres, investment 
bankers, who together own about 350,000 
shares, also took part in the selection and 
approval of candidates. Vogel remains 
the only member of management in the 
new slate. Tomlinson said he believed 
nominating of the new board "is in the 
best interests of Loew's share owners, 
employes and the public". Vogel stated 
that he had "held many meetings with 
various groups of stockholders who, by 
now, are surely convinced that we are re- 
sponsive to their wishes and desirous of 
placing Loew's again in a position of one 
of the leading companies in America." 
He expressed his appreciation "to my as- 
sociates on the board, starting with Ar- 
thur Loew, the retiring chairman, and in- 
cluding Howard Dietz, Charles C. Mos- 
kowitz, Benjamin Melniker, Charles M. 
Reagan, F. Joseph Holleran and G. Row- 
land Collins, who volunteered not to 
stand for reelection to the Loew board." 
Arthur Loew announced that he will de- 
vote full time to Loew's International. 




UNITED ARTISTS made the headlines again with propitious pronouncements about 
its prospering and expanding operations. In the latest developments, the management 
group announced: (1) the company grossed $65,300,000 world-wide in 1956 as compared 
to $55,000,000 the previous year; (2) UA will release approximately 48 features in 1957; 
(3) top budget productions will be stressed on the theory that there will be a "surfeit" 
of minor films; (4) UA has held preliminary discussions with a number of exhibitor or- 
ganizations which have indicated an interest in helping to finance UA product. Presi- 
dent Arthur Krim also said the company is giving consideration to public financing 
through a stock issue. Informed sources believed such a move to be a certainty in the 
very neir future. On production plans Kiim had this to say: "Over the past few months, 
United Artists has been making a careful study of exhibitor needs and market conditions 
to determine our production planning 



LOEW'S NEW BOARD SLATE 

JOSEPH R. VOGEL, president, Loew's, 
Inc.; GEORGE A. BROWNELL, lawyer, 
partner, Davis, Polk, Wardwell, Sunder- 
land & Kiendl; FRED F. FLORENCE, 
president, Republic National Bank of 
Dallas; LOUIS A. JOHNSON, lawyer, 
partner, Steptoe and Johnson. Former 
Sec'y of Defense; K. T. KELLER, for- 
mer chairman of the beard of Chrysler 
Corp; GEORGE L. KILLION, president, 
American President Lines, Ltd.; RAY 
LAWSON, chairman, Lawson & Jones, 
Ltd. Director, Royal Bank of Canada; 
STANLEY MEYER, motion picture ex- 
ecutive, formerly associated with TV star 
Jack Webb; WILLIAM A. PARKER, 
chairman of the board of Incorporated 
Investors, Inc.; FRANK PACE, JR., ex- 
ecutive vice president General Dynamics 
Corp. Former Sec'y of the Army; OG- 
DEN R. REID, president and editor, 
New York Herald Tribune; JOHN L. 
SULLIVAN, lawyer, partner in firm of 
Sullivan & Wynot. Former Sec'y of the 
Navy; JOSEPH TOMLINSON, indus- 
trialist, Tomlinson Bros. Construction. 



position ... In recent weeks we have 
noted announcements by other major 
companies that they are going into the 
lower-budget field on an extensive basis. 
We feel that there will be no shortage in 
this area and possibly a surfeit. As a re- 
sult United Artists will cut down on 
smaller-budget features in 1958 and con- 
centrate on 'A' pictures — picture that can 
play on their own as top features in any 
theatre in the world. We believe that this 
program will insure a more profitable 
operation for both exhibitors and our- 
selves." The UA president also reported 
that the company currently has an in- 
vestment of approximately $40,000,000 in 
product about to go into release. Al- 
though its 1957 and 1958 production will 
be 100 per cent financed by itself, new 
financing possibilities are being explored, 
according to Krim, because of the desire 
to bring as many top-calibre projects to 
the screen as possible and because of the 
prospect of a tightening of bank credit. 
Above, from left: v. p. William H. Heine- 
man, board chairman Robert S. Benjamin, 
Krim, and v. p. Max E. Youngstein. 



STEVE BROIDY, Allied Artists president, told the trade press in New York that his 
company will continue it? move into the big-time with a sb.te of 36 to 40 pictures in 
1957. Production costs, Broidy declared, could run to $15-20 million. He also revealed 
that AA expects to gross between $15 and $16 million in 1956, of which $3 million will 
come from the foreign market, and that the '57 intake should be even higher. Next 
year's program will include three or four big-budget films, the AA chief stated, at a 
cost of up to $3 million each. Half of its total output will be independent productions 
in which AA cooperates in financing to a certain extent. "We are maintaining an open 
door policy toward independent production," he told the press. Allied Artists has 20 
films finished or in production. Below, from left: vice president Edward Morey, sales 
head Morey R. Goldstein, executive v. p. George Burrows, v. p. Norton V. Ritchey. 
















[More NEWS on Page 18] 

Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 17 



HEADLINERS... 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




SHOR 



RUBEN SHOR, National Allied presi- 
dent, approved final plans for Allied's 
1957 Drive-In convention scheduled for 
Jan. 20-31 in Cincinnati. Shor and a com- 
mittee of seven met last week to put the 
finishing touches on the conclave which 
they reported will be "one of Allied's 
greatest conventions". This estimate was 
based on the large amount of booth space 
engaged by manufacturers and the heavy 
demands for reservations from exhibitors. 
Shor will function as permanent conven- 
tion chairman, with Robert F. Morrell as 
coordinator. Albert Sindlinger, motion 
picture research analyst, will be the fea- 
tured speaker, and general counsel Abram 
F. Myers will "sum up" at the conclusion 
of the convention. Allied's clinics on 
various exhibitor problems will also be an 
important phase of the gathering. Among 
the topics to be discussed will be the pro- 
posed arbitration system, and the film 
situation. According to a pre-convention 
bulletin, Allied reports that "information 
coming from many sections indicate that 
the drive-ins are experiencing difficulties 
in obtaining film which are the same in 
kind and pretty much the same in degree 
as the indoor theatres". The film com- 
panies were also chastised for standing 
aloof from such exhibitor conventions, 
stating that it is "ominous as an indication 
of an unwillingness by some company ex- 
ecutives to cooperate with their customers 
for the good of the whole industry, es- 
pecially in times like these." 

0 

DAVID O. SELZNICK and 20th-Fox 
have concluded a deal whereby Selznick's 
production company will do all the pre- 
and post-production work on one picture 
a year for two years. Both will star 
Jennifer Jones. 



THOMAS F. O'NEIL, board chairman 
of RKO Radio Pictures, appears to be on 
the verge of dismantling most of that or- 
ganization. Talks between executives of 
RKO and Universal Pictures on the re- 
ported deal whereby the latter company 
would take over domestic distribution of 
RKO product were said to be bogged 
down because of legal difficulties, but is 
expected to go through eventually. It is 
liekly that RKO will close its Gower 
Street Studios in Hollywood, shift pro- 
duction to the Culver City branch and let 
out much of its studio personnel. No 
official word has come from O'Neil or any 
other company executive, but at last 
weekend it seemed certain that, barring 
any sudden shift in plans, RKO will soon 
be functioning as an independent produc- 
tion unit making approximately ten films 
per year. 

0 

S. H. FABIAN had good news for Stan- 
ley Warner stockholders at the recent an- 
nual meeting. Net income for the first 
fiscal quarter ended Nov. 24, 1956, was 
shown to be $969,000, compared with 
$810,508 for the corresponding period last 
year. This was equal to 45c per share as 
against 37c. Gross income was $27,169,000 
compared to $23,926,500 in the first '55 
quarter. The S-W president revealed that 
the income of the chain for the week end- 
ing Jan. 5 was the largest for any one 
week since organization of the company. 

0 

FRED J. SCHWARTZ, Distributors 
Corp. of America president, announced a 
program of up to 23 pictures to be re- 
leased in 1957, a result of the "demand on 
the part of exhibitors for features that 
will pull audiences away from TV sets 
and into theatres". DCA intends to re- 
lease three to five top quality pictures, 
ten or 12 of the best of foreign product, 
and two or three "packages" of four to 
six exploitation films aimed at the juvenile 
audience. Schwartz reported that ten ex- 
change offices have been opened in the 
U.S. with plans calling for 15 to 18 
throughout the U. S. and Canada by the 
end of 1957. 

O 

NED E. DEPINET was elected president 
of the Motion Picture Pioneers, Inc., and 
the Foundation of the Motion Picture 
Pioneers, Inc., succeeding the late Jack 
Cohn. Depinet was formerly president of 
RKO Radio Pictures and an executive of 
COMPO. The Pioneers board of direc- 
tors also elected William J. German as 
treasurer and George Dembow secretary. 



WILLIAM C. (BILL) GEHRING, 59, 
20th Century-Fox vice president and spe- 
cial assistant to Fox president Spyros P. 
Skouras, died Jan. 17. 

HUMPHREY BOGART, 56, long a top 
boxoffice personality, died Jan. 14 of 
cancer in his Hollywood home. Bogart 
won an Academy Award in 1951 for his 
work in "The African Queen". His wife, 
Lauren Bacall, and two children, survive. 



NORMAN J . 
AYERS rejoined 
Warner Brothers as 
head of its playdate 
department, replac- 
ing ERNEST 
SANDS, appointed 
Midwest district 
manager. Ayers was 
formerly Eastern dis- 
trict mgr . . . Univer- 
sal v.p. DAVID A. 
LIPTON in New 
York for home of- 




fices conferences on AYERS 
upcoming product... 

American Broadcasting-Paramount Thea- 
tres president LEONARD H. GOLDEN- 
SON to receive 1956 Humanitarian Award 
of the March of Dimes at the Feb. 18 
testimonial dinner at the Waldorf-Astoria, 
chairmanned by 20th-Fox president SPY- 
ROS P. SKOURAS ... MYRON A. 
BLANK, ELMER C. RHODEN, 
ROBERT W. SELIG & BERNARD 
BROOKS among the 23 theatremen who 
have accepted posts as chairmen for their 
areas of the amusement industry's 
Brothehood Drive for 1957. Drive will be 
launched at the Waldorf-Astoria Jan. 24 
at a dinner honoring JACK L. WARNER 
with Brotherhood Award for 1957 . . . The 
late JACK COHN, former executive vice 
president of Columbia Pictures, was pre- 
sented with a posthumous award for out- 
standing service, at the 4th annual awards 
luncheon of the amusement industry 
branch of the Federation of Jewish Phil- 
anthropies. RALPH COHN, vice presi- 
dent of Screen Gems and son of the late 
movie pioneer, accepted the award. $186,- 
000 was raised toward the industry's goal 
of $250,000 ... ERIC JOHNSTON an- 
nounced appointment of CHARLES E. 
EGAN as MPEAA representative for 
India, Pakistan and Burma due to the "in- 
creased importance of the Far Eastern 
market" ... WILLIAM NUTT elevated 

CFSHJ.. 

At screening of WB's "Top Secret Affair": 
Bernard R. Goodman, Roy Haines, Robert K. 
Shapiro, Ralph lannuzzi, and Wilbur Snaper. 

from story editor to administrative assist- 
ant by WILLIAM DOZIER, RKO pro- 
duction head . . . SPYROS P. SKOURAS 
and other Fox executives on hand Jan. 19 
to welcome INGRID BERGMAN "Ana- 
stasia" star, in from Europe to accept the 
New York Film Critics' best actress 
award... UA advertising manager 
JOSEPH GOULD back at home offices 
from a week of Hollywood conferences on 
spring ad campaigns . . . 20th-Fox sales 
manager ALEX HARRISON meeting 
with Eastern division manager MARTIN 
MOSKOWITZ in Philadelphia to map 
distribution plans for the new year. Meet- 
ing is one of series being conducted by the 
sales topper around the country. Also at- 
tending, Fox advertising director ABE 
GOODMAN... GEORGE WELTNER, 
president of Paramount Film Distributing 
Corp., and JERRY PICKMAN, ad-pub 
v.p., among Paramount home office execu- 
tives in attendance at the Jan. 16-18 na- 
tional sales and merchandising confer- 
ence in St. Louis ... SYLVAN COHEN, 
newly installed chief barker of Variety 
Club Tent 13, Philadelphia, toastmaster 
at Jan. 21 dinner honoring UA Eastern 
district mgr. GENE TUNICK and Phila. 
branch mgr. STANLEY KOSITSKY, 
recently promoted by United Artists . . . 
DIED: VIVIAN MOSES, former 20th- 
Fox ad-pub director and RKO veteran. 



Page 18 Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 



Jcuttk Annual 

NATIONAL ALLIED 
DRIVE-IN THEATRE 
CONVENTION 

0 

Netherland-Hilton Hotel Cincinnati, Ohio 
January 29 -30 -31, 1357 

Wife, Phcne w Write 
Jet tfcuf £eJeri?atich4 
7<x{ai{ - be 9t fat*! 

Attend What Will Undoubtedly Be 
The Largest — Createst Convention 
Of All Time — A Real Experience In 
All Phases Of The Theatre Business! 

Send Reservations To 
Direct To — Netherland-Hilton Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Rube Shor — 1632 Central Parkway, Cincinnati 10, Ohio 

SEE HOW, LEARN HOW, LEAVE, KNOW HOW! 
ENTERTAINMENT DAILY FOR THE LADIES 



Film BULLETIN January 21, 1957 Page 



19 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



All The Vital Details on Current &) Coming Features 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



ALLIED ARTISTS 



September 

CALLING HOMICIDE Bill Elliot, Jeane Cooper, Kath- 
leen Case. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Edward 
Bernds. Melodrama. Policeman breaks baby extortion 
racket. 61 min. 

FIGHTING TROUBLE Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Queenie Smith. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director George 
Blair. Comedy drama. Bowery Boys apprehend hood- 
lums by fast work with a camera. 61 min. 

STRANGE INTRUDER Edward Purdom, Ida Lupino, Ann 
Harding, Jacques Bergerac. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Irving Rapper. Drama. A returning Korean vet 
makes a strange promise to a dying comrade-in-arms. 
81 min. 

October 

CRUEL TOWER. THE John Ericson, Mari Blanchard, 
Charles McGraw. Producer Lindstey Parsons. Director 
Lew Landers. Drama. Steeplejacks fight for woman 
on high tower. 80 min. 

YAQUI DRUMS Rod Cameron, Mary Castle. Producer 
William Broidy. Director Jean Yarbrough. Western. 
Story of a Mexican bandit. 71 min. 

November 

BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in the death cell. 74 min. 

FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Marjorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Quaker family during the Civil War. 139 min. 10/1 

December 

HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 
HOT SHOTS Hunti Hatl, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 62 min. 

January 

CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

GUN FOR A TOWN Dale Robertson, Brian Keith, 
Rossano Rory. Producer Frank Woods. Director Brian 
Keith. Western. 72 min. 

February 

ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 68 min. 

LAST OF THE BADMEN CinemaScope, Color. George 
Montgomery, Jar»ei Best. Producer Vinoent Fennelly. 
Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws u*e detective 
as only recognisable ma/i in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 
NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 67 min. 

March 

LET'S BE HAPPY CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony 
Martin, Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Di- 
rector Henry Levin. Musical. 105 min. 

Coming 

DAUGHTER OF DR. JEKYtL John Agar, Gloria Talbot, 
Arthur Shields. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar Unger. Horror. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 

Freeman, Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 

Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 

stockade in small western town. 81 min. 

FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT Bill Elliot. Don Haggerty. 

Melodrama. 

HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Huntz Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle with unscrupulous hypnotist. 
61 min. 

HUNCHBACK OF PARIS, THE CinemaScope, Color. 
Gtna Lollobrigida, Anthony puiqn. A Paris Production. 
Director Jean Delannoy. Drama. Hunchback falls in 
love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 
LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wifder. Drama. 



OKLAHOMAN, THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
of unscrupulous brotheis. 81 min. 

SIERRA STRANGER Howard Duff, Gloria McGhee. 
Western. 75 min. 



COLUMBIA 



September 

MIAMI EXPOSE Lee J. Cobb, Patricia Medina, Ed- 
ward Arnold. Producei Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
Sears. Melodrama. Mob schemes to introduce legalized 
gambling in Miami, Florida. 73 min. 8/6. 

1984 Edmund O'Brien, Michael Redgrave, Jan Sterling. 
A Holiday Production. Director Michael Anderson. 
Drama. From the novel by George Orwell. 91 min. 

SPIN A DARK WEB Faith Domergue, Lee Patterson, 
Rona Anderson. Producer George Maynard. Director 
Vernon Sewell. Melodrama. Engineer gets involved 
with racketeers. 76 min. 7/23. 

October 

PORT AFRIQUE Technicolor. Pier Angelli, Phil Carey, 
Dennis Price. Producer David E. Rose. Director Rudy 
Mate. Drama. Ex-Air Force flyer finds murderer of 
his wife. 92 min. 9/17. 

SOLID GOLD CADILLAC, THE Judy Holliday, Paul 
Douglas, Fred Clark. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Filimization of the famous 
Broadway play about a lady stockholder in a large 
holding company. 99 min. 8/20. 

STORM CENTER Bette Davis, Brian Keith, Paul Kelley, 
Kim Hunter. Producer Julian Blaustein. Director Daniel 
Taradash. Drama. A librarian protests the removal of 
"controversial" from her library, embroils a small 
town in a fight. 85 min. 8/6. 

November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdonald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD. THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 
graphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
Yves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 

WHITE SOUAW, THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bick- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 

December 

LAST MAN TO HANG. THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE Takashi Shimura, Tothiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Alt-Ira Kurosawa. 
Melodrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/10 

RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY, THE Technicolor. Randolph Scott, 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the glory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 

January 

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, Alan Data, Producer Sam Katiman. Direc- 
tor Fred Sears. Musical. Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 1/7. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest, Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
becomes notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 



February 

NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray, Anne Bancroft. Producer Te< 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaker 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money 
78 min. 12/10. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun, Susan Cummings, Angel. 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred Sears 
Western. Two men join hands because they see in eacl 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 75 min 
WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Fhil Carey. Pro 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. / 
beautiful girl wins a beauty contest and a "different' 
life. 132 min. 

March 

FULL OF LIFE Judy Holliday, Richard Contej 
Salvatore Baccaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Dlrectoi 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wiff 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival o 

child. 91 min. 1/7. 

Coming 

BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. CorS 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Direc 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men seel 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Grayson 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Free 
Sears. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/1! 

FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rit* 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A Wan 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drama 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is in, 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 

GARMENT JUNGLE, THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Man 
thews, Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. Dil 
rector Robert Aldrich. Drama. 

GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murpfiy, Kathryt 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brown. Director Georgi 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women U 
fight off Indian attack. 

KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller. Carol Thurston. Pro- 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad- 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-man 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroyto 
by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

MOST WANTED WOMAN, THE Victor Mature, Anit;: 
Ekberg, Trevor Howard. A Warwick Production. Di' 
rector John Gilling. 

PAPA, MAMA. THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureu«< 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul Li 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisiat 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW, THE Betsy Garrett, Phi 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Directoi : 
William Asher. Melodrama. Seven-year old boy is thi 
only witness to a murder. 

STRANGE ONE, THE Ben Gazzara, James Olsen, Georgi! 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James Gar 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames com 
mander and his son. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atl. 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in Work 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL RIDER, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone 
Maureen Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Directo 
Budd Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles t< 
be independent. 

27TH DAY, THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Produce 
Helen Ainsworth. Director William Asher. Science 
/iotion. People from outer space plot to destroy al 
human life on the earth. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY, THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmore 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Drama 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



October 

GUNSLINGER Color (American-International) John Ire, 
land, Beverly Garland, Alison Hayes. Producer-directoi 
Roger Corman. Western. A notorious gunman terrorize: 
the West. 

PASSPORT TO TREASON (Astor Pictures! Rod Camer 
on, Lois Maxwell. Producers R. Baker, M. Berman 
Director Robert Baker. Drama. Private investigatoi 
stumbles upon a strange case of murder. 70 min. 
RIFIFI . . . MEANS TROUBLE (United Motion Picturt 
Organization! Jean Servais, Carl Mohner. Director 
Jules Dassis. Melodrama. Enqlish dubbed story o 
the French underworld. 120 min. 11/12. 



Film BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



FEBRUARY SUMMARY 

The number of features scheduled for 
February release totals 26. Leaei.ng sup- 
plier, with five films, will be RKO, while 
United Artists will follow with four on the 
roster. Allied Artists, Columbia, Universal 
and the Independents will release three 
each; Metro, two; Paramount, 20th-Fox 
and Warners, one each. Four of the Feb- 
ruary releases will be in color, a marked 
decrease from previous months. Four 
films will be in CinemaScope, one in 
VistaVision. 

12 Dramas 4 Science-Fiction 

3 Westerns 1 Melodrama 

3 Comedies 2 Adventures 

1 Musical 



, WAMP WOMEN Woolncrl Color. Csro e Mathews 
I everly Garland. Touch Connors. Producer-director 
I oger Corman. Adventure. Wild women in the Louisiana 

November 

I I ARCELI NO lUnited Motion Picture Organization' 
labilto Calvo. Rafael Rivelles. Director' Ladislao 
ladja. Drama. Franciscan monks find aoandoned baby 
■nd adopt him. 90 min. 11/12. 

\ ECRETS OF LIFE Buena Vista) . Latest in Walt Dis- 

■ ey's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/2?. 

I HAKE, RATTLE AND ROCK I American-International I 
lisa Gaye. Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson. 

■ irector Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 

/EE GORDiE iGeorge K. Arthur! Bill Travers. Elastair 

■ im Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 

■ rank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 
llature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwing cham- 
pionship. 94 min. 11/12. 

WESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS Buena Vista' Cine- 
iiaScope. Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kaihieen Crowley. 
I. Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 

December 

ABY AND THE BATTLESHIP, THE DC A ! Richard 
|»ttenborough, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
■•orough. Director Jay Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 
Imuggled aboard a British battleship during mock 

ED OF GRASS (Trans-Lux! Anna Brazzou. Made in 
IJreece English titles. Drama. A beautiful girl is per- 
lecuted by her villiage for having lost her virtue as 

■ he victim of a rapist. 

I'-IOUR OF DECISION (Astor Pictures! Jeff Morrow. 

A SORCIERE [Ellis Films I Marina Vlady. Nicole 
j^ourel. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A ycung French 
Engineer meets untamed forest maiden while working 
in Sweden. French dialogue. English subtitles. 

<4EN OF SHERWOOD FOREST lAstor Pictures) East- 
jrian Color. Don Taylor. Producer Michael Carreras. 
Director Val Guest. Adventure. Story of Robin Hood 
lind his men. 78 min. 

JOCK, ROCK, ROCK IDCAl. Alan Freed LaVern 
[laker, Frankie Lyman. A Vanguard Production. Musical 
loanorama of rock and roll. 

iNOW WAS BLACK. THE I Continental ) Daniel Gelin 
Ualentine Tessier. A Tellus Film. French language film". 
IDrama. Study of an embittered young man who lives 

with mother in her house of ill fame. 105 min. 

[WO LOVES HAVE I (Jacon) Technicolor. Gabriele 

-erzetti. Marta Toren. A Rizioli FMm. Director Carmine 
Ljallone. Drama. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 
loest known operas. 

January 

I ALBEIT SCHWEITZER (Hill and Anderson) Eastman 
Color. Film biography of the famous Nobel Prize win- 
der with narritive by Burgess Merideth. Producer-direc- 
tor James Hill. Documentary. 

BULLFIGHT (Janus). French made documentary offers 
history and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
and directed by Pierre Braunberger. 74 min. 11/24. 
iFEAR lAstor Pictures) Ingrid Bergman Mathias Wie- 
man. Director Roberto Rossellini. Drama. Young 
imarried woman is mercilessly exploited by blackmailer. 



VITTELONI lAPI-Janusl. Franco Interlenghi, Leonora 
if-abnzi. Producer Mario de Vecchi. Director F. Fel- 
103 m * < ?/2« St0rV °' unemploved Young men in Italy. 

WE ARE ALL MURDERERS IKingsley International I 
Marcel Mouloudji, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
Gayette. Drama. 

February 

HOUR OF DECISION (Astor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
Hazel Court. Producer Monty Berman. Director Denn- 
mgton Richards. Melodrama. Columnist's wife is in- 
nocently involved in blackmail and murder. 70 min. 
ROCK ALL NIGHT (American-International) Dick 
Miller. Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Rock n' roll musical. 

TEMPEST IN THE FLESH (Pacemaker Pictures) Ray- 
mond Pellegrin, Francoise Arnoul. Director Ralph 
Habib. French film, English titles. Drama. Study of a 
young woman with a craving for love that no number 
of men can satisfy. 

Coming 

CITY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen. Robert 
Hutton, Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Petroff 
Drama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 
IF ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . (Buena Vista) 
Andre Valrny, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 
Drama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 
their efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 
IT CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International) 
Peter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 
space takes control of the world until a scientist gives 
his life to save humanity. 

LOST CONTINENT IIFE) CinemaScope, rerranieolor. 
Producer-director Leonardo Bonzi. An excursion into the 
wilds of Borneo and the Maylayan Archepeiago. Eng- 
lish commentary. 84 min. 



NEAPOLITAN CAROUSEL IIFE, lux Film. Rome! Pathe- 
coior. Print pv lecnnicoior Sophia loren Leomoe 
Massine. Director Ettore GUnnini. Musical. The history 
of Napies traced from 1400 to date in song and dance 
OKLAHOMA WOMAN (American Releasing Cor».) 
Superscope. Richard Denning. Peggie Castie Cathv 
Downs. Producer-director Roger Corman. Western. A 
ruthless woman rules the badlands ur.-H a reformea 
outlaw brings her to justice. 80 mm. 

REM'MBER, MY LOVE I Artists-Producers Assoc Cine- 
maScope, Technlcclor. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer, 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburgcr. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

RUNAWAY DAUGHTERS American-International) 
Maria English, Anna Sten. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
rector Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
age problems. 

SMOLDERING SEA. THE Superscope. Producer Hal E. 
Chester Drama. Conflict between the tyrannical cao- 
tain and crew of an American merchant ship reacnes 
its climax during battle of Guadalcanal 

UNDEAD, THE I American-International) Pamela Dun- 
cm, Allison Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 

WEAPON, THE Sucerscooe. Nicole Maurev. Prcducer 
Hai E. Chester. Drama. An unsolved muroer involving 
a bitter U. S. war veteran, a German war orioe and a 
killer is resolved after a child finds a loaded gun in 
OOmD ruDO e 

WOMAN OF ROME DCA) Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
Gelin. A PontiDeLaurentiis Production. Director Luigi 
Zampa. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
novel. 



M ETRO -GO LDWYN - MAYER 



September 

LUST FOR LIFE Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Kirk 
Douglas, Anthony Ouinn. James Donald, Pamela Brown. 
Producer John Houseman. Director Vincente Minnelli. 
Film dramatization of the life and works of the famous 
artist, Vincent Van Gogh. 122 min. 9/17. 

TEA AND SYMPATHY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Deborah Kerr, John Kerr. Producer Pandro Berman. 
Director Vincente Minnelli. Drama. Wife of housemaster 
at New England school gets involved with young boy. 

122 min. 10/1. 

October 

JULIE Doris Day, Louis Jourdain. Producer Marty 
Melcher. Director Andrew Stone. Drama. Jealous hus- 
band plans to kill wife. 99 min. 10/15. 

OPPOSITE SEX, THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
June Alyyson, Joan Collins, Dolores Gray. Producer 
Joe Pasternak. Director David Miller. Comedy. The 
perfect wife is unaware of flaws in her marriage until 
a gossip friend broadcasts the news. 114 min. 10/1. 

POWER AND THE PRIZE CinemaScope. Robert Taylor, 
Burl Ives, Elisabeth Mueller. Director Henry Koster. 
Producer Nicholas Nayfak. Drama. Tale of big business 
and international romance. 98 min. 9/17. 

November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, Bob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
94 min. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME, THE Tom Ewell. Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 

TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON. THE Cinema- 
Scope, Eastman Color. Marlon Brando, Glenn Ford, 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Comedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 

123 min. 10/29. 

January 

ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson. Martine Carol, Gustave Rojo. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. 

EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 85 min. 1/7. 

SLANDER Van Johnson. Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutseh. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 81 min. 1/7. 

February 

BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET. THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gielgud. Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. Love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 104 min. 

WING* OF THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne. Dan 
Dailey, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. 

Coming 

DESIGNING WOMAN Gregory Peck. Lauren Bacall, 
Dolores Gray. Producer Dore Schary. Director Vincente 
Minnelli. 



HAPPY ROAD, THE Gene Kelly. Michael Redgrave. 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors, Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 

HARVEST THUNDER Pier Angeli Mel Ferrer. Leif 
Erickson. Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Je.'frey Hay- 
den. Drama. 

HOT SUMMER NIGHT Leslie Nielsen, Coleen Miller. 
Producer Morton Fine. Director David Friedkin. Melo- 
drama. Story of a gangland hide-out. 

LITTLE HUT, THE MetroColor. Ava Gardner, Stewart 
Granger. Comedy. 

LIVING IDOL. THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Al Lewin. Drama. An archeologist is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color. CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor. Montgomery Clift. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle 1 8 00 ' s . 

SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson Dana Wynter, 
Wendy HMIer. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. 

TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin. Anna Maria Alberghetti. Producer 
Joseph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 
THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT Jean Simmons. Paul 
Douglas. Comedy. 



PARAMOUNT 



October 

SEARCH FOR BRIDEY MURPHY. THE Louis Hayward, 
Teresa Wright. Producer Pat Duggan. Director Noel 
Langley. Drama. Tne famous book by Morey Bernstein 
on film. 84 min. 

November 

MOUNTAIN. THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane hat 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in the 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about the 

movies. 95 min. 12/10. 

WAR AND PEACE ViitaVijio-i Technicolor. Aodrev 
Hepburn. Henry Fonda. Mel Ferrer. Producers Carle 
Ponti Dino gi Laurentiis. Director King Vioor. Drama 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 

January 

THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision. Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 

100 min. 1/7. 

February 

RAINMAKER. THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster. Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 

March 

FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden, 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of the Boston baseball player 



FMm 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



Coming 

BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N.Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 

BUSTER KEATON STORY. THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth, Rhonda Ftomlng. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. 

DELICATE DELINQUENT. THE Jerry Lewi's, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. 

FLAMENECA VistaVision, Technicolor. Carmen SevlUa, 
Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director Don- 
ald Siegel. 

FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audrey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens. Director Stanley Donen. Musical. 
GUNFI6HT AT O.K. CORRAL VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallis. Director John Sturges. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his cheating 
brother. 

JOKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. F^nk Sinatra, 
Mitzi Gaynor, Jeanne Crain. Producer "»!Tluel Briskin. 
Director Charles Vidor. Drama. 

LONELY MAN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Perkins, Elaine Aiken. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he is losing his sight — and his aim. 
OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget. Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure. 
The life and times of medieval Persia's literary idol. 
TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston. Yul Brynner, Anne Bai*e r . Producer- 
director Cecil <S DeMille. Reliaious drama. Life storv 
of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 219 min. 10/15 
TIN STAR. THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda, Anthony 
Perkins. A Perlherg-Seaton Production. Director An- 
thony Mann. V • tern. 



REPUBLIC 



October 

SCANDAL INCORPORATED Robert Hutton, Paul Rich- 
ards, Patricia Wright. A C.M.B. Production. Director 
Edward Mann. Drama. Expose of scandal magazines 
preying on movie stars and other celebrities. 79 min. 

November 

A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker, 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 

CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope, Trucolor. 
Johanna Mati, Rudolf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intrigue and mystery in Vienna during 
the time of Prince Metternich. 

TEARS FOR SIMON Eastman Color. David Farrar, 
David Knight, Julia Arnall. A J. Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama. Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child stolen. 

December 

ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor. David Brian, Vera 
Ralston. Melodrama. Associate producer-director 
Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland lawyer is 
murdered by attractive girl singer. 

IN OLD VIENNA Trucolor. Heinz Roettinger, Robert 
Killick. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal. Romances and triumphs of Franz Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 

January 

ABOVE UP THE WAVES John Mills, John Gregson, 
Donald Sinden. Producer W. MacQuirty. Director Ralph 
Thomas. Drama. Midget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWII. 

AFFAIR IN RENO Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G. Spring- 
stein. Drama. Young heiress falls for fortune-hunting 
gambler. 

Coming 

DUEL AT APACHE WELLS Naturama. Trucolor. Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Western. Son returns home to 
find father's ranch threatened by rustler-turned-rancher. 
HELL'S CROSSROADS Naturama. Stephen McNally, 
Peggie Castle, Robert Vauhgn. Producer Rudy Ral- 
ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after joining Jesse James' gang. 
SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Vera Ralston, Rrd Camer- 
on. Producer-director Joe Kane. 




October 

FINGER OF GUILT Richard Basehart, Mary Murphy, 
Constance Cummings. Producer-director Alec Snowden. 
Drama. Film producer receives letters from a girl he 
never met, who insists they were lovers. 84 min. 11/26 

TENSION AT TABLE ROCK Color. Richard Egan, 

Dorothy Malone, Cameron Mitchell. Producer Sam 
Weisenthal. Director Charles Warren. Western. The 
victory of a town over violence. 93 min. 10/29. 

Film 



November 

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL George Sanders, Yvonne 
DeCarlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor. Producer-director Charles 
Martin. Melodrama. Tale of an international financial 
wizard. 119 min. 11/12. 

December 

MAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg, Bill Campbell, 
Karen Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A younq locksmith gets 
involved with a group engaged in illegal activities. 
73 min. 1/7. 

January 

BRAVE ONE. THE CinemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
Ray, Fermin Rivera, Joy Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. Pro- 
ducer Frank i Maurice King. Director Irving Rapper. 
Drama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
jrows up with a bull as his main comoanion and friend 
and how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 

BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Debbie 
Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Adolph Menjou. Producer Ed- 
mund Grainger. Director Norman Tauro'* Comedy. 
Son of department store magnet falls i salesgirl. 
98 min. 12/24. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 

YOUNG STRANGER. THE James MacArthur, Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Franken- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 
parents. 

February 

CYCLOPS, THE James Craig, Gloria Talbot. Science- 
fiction. 

GUILTY Technicolor. J-.hn Justin, Barbara Laage. 
Drama. 

SILKEN AFFAIR, THE David Niven, Genevieve Page, 
Ronald Sauire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director Roy 
Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on a kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 min. 

THAT NIGHT John Beal, Augusta Dabney, Shepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Director John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a 15- 
year-old marriage. 

X— THE UNKNOWN Dean Jagger. William Russell. 
Science-fiction. 

March 

RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 

Coming 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY, THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 

ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY. THE Eastman Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublin. 
Director Mitchell Leison. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking second place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 

JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hughes Production. Producer 
Jules Furth'man Director Josef von SternDero. Drama. 
119 min. 

UNHOLY WIFE, THE Color. Diana Dors, Rod Steiger, 
Marie Windsor. Producer-director John Farrow. Drama. 
A wife sunningly plots the death of her husband who 
she has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS, THE Arthur O'Connell, Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director John Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



October 

BETWEEN HEAVEN AND HELL CinemaScope. De- 
Luxe Color. Robert Wagner, Terry Moore. Producer 
David Weisbart. Director Robert Fleischer. War drama. 
World War II setting in he Pacific. 94 min. 10/29. 
STAGECOACH TO FURY CinemaScope. Forrest Tucker, 
Mari Blanchard, Wally Ford, Wright King. Producer 
Earle Lyon. Director William Claxton. Western. Mexican 
bandits hold up stage coach in search for gold. 76 min. 
TEENAGE REBEL CinemaScope. Ginger Rogers, Michael 
Rennie. Producer Charles Brackett. Director S. Engle. 
Comedy. Mother and daughter find mutual respect and 
devotion. 94 min. 10/29. 

November 

DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN, THE Robert Arthur, Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 
73 min. 11/26. 



LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley, Richarc 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director Ri 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentuck\ 
locale. 89 min. 11/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope, Technicolor. Gordon Mac 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 

December 

ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Filmization of famou; 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 

BLACK WHIP, THE Hugh Marlowe, Adele Mara. Pro- 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. 77 min. 

GIRL CAN'T HELP IT, THE CinemaScope, De Lux< 
Color. Tom EweM, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-directoi 
Frank Tashlin. Comedy. Satire on rock 'n' roll. 9V 
min. 1/7. 

OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michele Morgan, Cornel 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd Os 
wald. Director Yves Allgret. Drama. Gold smuggle 
falls in love with lady sent to kill him. Violent ending 
WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. Jame: 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Production 
Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 

January 

GUIET GUN. THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mare 
Morday. Western. 

THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Milland, Ernes' 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Philip 
Dunne. Drama. Government employee is wronged b> 
too-zealous pursuit of security program. 89 min. 

February 

THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herbert 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The lives 
and time of America's famous outlaw gang. 

Coming 

BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina Lollobrigida, I 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Director 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

BOY ON A DOLPHIN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color' 
Clifton Webb, Alan Ladd, Sophia Loren. Producer Sam' 
Engel. Director Jean Negulesco. Drama. 
HEAVEN KNOWS MR. ALLISON CinemaScope De Luxe 
Color. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Producers 
Buddy Adler, Eugene Frenke. Director John Huston. 
Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific during WWII. 
ISLAND IN THE SUN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. 
James Mason, Joan Fontaine, Dorothy Dandridge. Pro- 
ducer Darryl Zanuck. Director Robert Rossen. Drama. 
OH, MEN! OH, WOMEN! CinemaScope, Color. Dan 
Daily, Ginger Rogers, David Niven. Producer-director 
Nunnally Johnson. Comedy. 

RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brady. 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director Alan 
Dwan. 

RIVER'S EDGE. THE CinemaScope, Color. Ray Milland. 
Anthony Quinn, Debra Paget. Producer Benidict 
Bogeaus. Director Allan Dwan. Adventure. 
SEA WIFE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Richard Bur- 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director Bob 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarine 
off Singapore harbor. 

SHE-DEVIL. THE Mari Blanchard. Jack Kelly, Albert 
Dekker. Producer-director Kurt Neumann. 
SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Rich- 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Producer- 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussie boy 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 

STORM RIDER, THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers. A 
Brady-Glasser production. Director Edward Bernds. 
Western. 



UNITED ARTISTS 



October 

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS 1 Michael Todd 
Productions! Todd-AO, Color. David Niven, Cantiflas, 
Martine Cam.'. Producer M. Todd. Director Michael 
Anderson. Adventure. Filmization of the famous Jules 
Verne novel. 175 min. 10/29. 

ATTACK Jack Palance, Eddie Albert, Lee Marvin. Pro- 
ducer-director Robert Aldrich. Drama. A cowardly 
army officer and his men during a crucial battle of 
World War II. 107 min. 9/17. 

BOSS. THE John Payne, Doe Avedon, William Bishop. 
Producer Frank Seltzer. Director Byron Haskin. Melo- 
drama. A city falls prey to a corrupt political ma- 
chine. 89 min. 9/17. 

FLIGHT TO HONG KONG Rory Calhoun, Dolores Don- 
Ion. A Sabre Production. Director Joe Newman. Drama. 
An airline flight to Hong Kong sparks international 
intrigue. 88 min. 10/15. 

MAN FROM DEL RIO Anthony puinn, Katy Jurac'\ 
Producer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. Wes.- 
ern. Badman turns sheriff in lonely town. 82 min. 10/15 

November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness, Angie Dickin- 
son, Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Director 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunman gets 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him when 
wounded. 78 min. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



UNITED ARTISTS (Continual 

ACEMAKER, THE James Mitchell. Rosemarie Bowe, 
In Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post, 
ijestern. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattle- 
Jin and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 

INNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dowling, 
|thur Franz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Couffer. 
f-ector Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped fugi- 

es are chased by local townspeople and officer of 
l> law. 83 min. 1 1/12. 

IARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe. Color. Victor 
iityre, Karen Steele. Producer Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 
rector Jerry HopDer. Drama Saga of the Navy's 
nderwater-men". 73 min. 10/29. 

December 

ASS LEGEND, THE Hugh O'Brian. Raymond Burr, 
incy Gates Western. Producer Bob Geldstein. Di- 
|Ctor Gerd Oswald. Western. 79 min. 

VNCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott. Lou Costello. 
.oducer Robert Goldstein. Director Charles Barton, 
jjmedy. 79 min. 12/24. 

NG AND FOUR QUEENS, THE CinemaScop- Color, 
'ark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, J tJ n Willis, 
nrbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 

?ad. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 1/7. 

ILD PARTY, THE Anthony Quinn. Carol Ohmart, Paul 

ewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 
orner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval offi- 
lr and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 

January 

G EOODLE. THE Errol Flynn, Rossana Rory A Lewis 
Blumberg Production. Director Ricrurd Wilson. Ad- 



' VE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden. 
| Grand Production. Director Henry Kesler. Drama. 
Ii woman tries to give FBI highly secret material stolen 
Bom Russians. 

ALLIDAY B1AND, THE Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lind- 
■ irs, Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
} sseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
I ither and son with disaster. 77 min. 

February 

• RIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck Sterling 
hayden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen. Di- 

ictor Gerd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 
Imbition for her husband leads to murder. 85 min. 1/7. 

RANGO Jeff Chandler. Joanne Dru. An Earlmar Pro- 
duction. Hall Bartlett producer-director. Adventure. 
FlEN IN WAR Robert Ryan, Aldo Ray. Robert Keith. 
Iroducer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann 

rama. 

OMAHAWK TRAIL John Smith, Susan Cummings. A 
lei Air Production. Director Robert Parry. Western 
lowboy versus Indians. 61 min. 

Coming 

ACHELOR PARTY, THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall 
lack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 
rh"" f k r ° m ' arnOUS ,elevision drama by Paddy 

AILOUT AT 43,000 John Payne, Karen Steele. A Pine- 
Ihomas Production. Director Francis Lyon. 

IG CAPER, THE Rory CaJhound, Mary Costa. Pine- 
Ihomas Production. Director Robert Stevens. 

-IRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS, THE Lex Barker Anne 
lancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production Di- 
lector Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slayings 
terrorize western resort. 

jllDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
hubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth 
lirama. 

IIS FATHER'S GUN Dane Clark, Ben Cooper Lori Nel- 
oo. Bel Au- Production. Director Lesley Selander. 
ONELY GUN. THE Anthony Quinn, Katy Jurado. Pro- 
lucer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 
MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD, THE Tim 

'Holt, Audrey Dalton. A Gramercy Production. Director 

Urnold Laven. Science-fiction. 

rfONTE CARLO STORY, THE Technirama Color. Mar- 
ene Dietrich. Vittorio De Sica. A Titanus Film. Sam 
aylor director. 

'HAROAH'S CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Howard Koch. Director Lee Sholem. Horror. Reincar- 
jiatton of mummies. 

■RIDE AND THE PASSION, THE VistaVision, Techni- 
olor. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra. Sophia Loren. Pro- 
Mucer-director Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
luarrilla band marches an incredible distance with a 
.000 pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
ence of 1810. 

1EVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Jehner, Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
ector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
oldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 min. 
iAVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor. Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
V Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
alls in love with a peasant who contests her right 
o rule the kingdom. 101 min. 

STREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery, Geraldine 
irooks. Producer William Berke. 

iPRING REUNION Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews. Jean 
Haqen. Director Robert Pirosh. Producer Jerry Bresler. 
Comedy. 



TROOPER HOOK Joel McCrea. Barbara Stanwyck Ed- 
ward Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marquis 
Warren. 

12 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda. Lee J Cobb Jack 
Warden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sicney 
Lumet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 

VODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff. Beverly Tyler A Bel 
Air Production. Director Reginald Le Borg Horror. 



U N I VERSA L- 1 NT' L 



October 

PILLARS OF THE SKY Technicolor. Jeff Chandler, 
Dorothy Malone, Ward Bond. Producer Robert Arthur. 
Director George Marshall. Drama. The spirit of Religion 
helps to settle war bewteen Indians and Cavalrymen 
in the Oregon Country. 95 min. 9/3. 

SHOWDOWN AT ABILENE Technicolor. Jock Mahoney, 
Martha Myer. Lyle Bettger. Producer Howard Christie. 
Director Charles Haas. Western. Cowboy returns to 
Abilene after four years in the Confederate Army to 
find things considerably changed. 80 min. 9/3. 

November 

UNGUARDED MOMENT, THE Technicolor. Esther Wil- 
liams, George Nader. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Drama. High school teacher is almost 
criminally assaulted by student. 95 min. 9/3. 

December 

CURCU, BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
Bromfield, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay, 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siod nak. Horror. Young 
woman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
are terroriied by mysterious jungle beast. 

EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
Maureen O'Hara. John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
dent gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 11/12. 

MOLE PEOPLE, THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror. 
Scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 

January 

FOUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
George Nader, Julie Adams. Marianne Cook. Producer 
A. Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
85 min. 12/10 

ROCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo. John Saxon, Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
Bartlett. Musical. Rock n' roll story of college combo. 
89 min. 1 1/2*. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
Lauren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
smith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
violent death because of jealousy for wife. 99 min. 10/1 

February 

GREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
rer. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
idol. 92 min. 11/26. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope, Technicolor. Errol Rynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 84 min. 

NIGHT RUNNER, THE Ray Danton, Colleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Biberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 

March 

BATTLE HYMN Technicolor. Rock Hudson. Martha Hyer, 
Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of guilt because of 
bombing of an orphanage by saving other orphans. 
108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD Technicolor. Fred MacMurray, 
Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Producer William Alland. 
Director Abner Biberman. Western. Three brothers run 
a cattle ranch after death of their father. 88 min. 1/7. 

MISTER CORY Eastman Color. CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford. Producer 
Robert Artuhr. Director Blake Edwards. Gambler from 
Chicago slums climbs to wealth and respectability. 
92 min. 

Coming 

INTERLUDE Technicolor. CinemaScope. June Allyson. 
Rossano Brazzi. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy. George Nader, Keenan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. 

KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son. Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of dog- 
act in show business in the early I930's. 

MAN AFRAID George Nader, Tim Hovey. Producer 
Gordon Kay. Director Harry Keller. 

TAMMY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds, 
Lslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Joe 
Pevney. 

TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arno+d. 



WARNFR BROTHERS 



September 

A CRY IN THE NIGHT Edmond O'Brien. Natalie Wood. 
Brian Donlevy. A Jaguar Production. Director Frank 
Tyttle. Drama. Mentally unbalanced man surprises 
couple in Lover's Lane. 75 min. 8/20. 

AMAZON TRADER, THE WarnerColor. John Sutton. 
Producer Cedric Francis. Director Tom McGowan. Ad- 
venture. Stirring events in the Amazon territory of 
Brazil. 41 min. 

BAD SEED. THE Nancy Kelly, Patty McCormack, Henry 
Jones. Produced and directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Dra- 
ma. Film version of the famous Broadway play about 
a child murderess. 129 min. 

BURNING HILLS. THE CinemaScooe. WarnerColor Tab 
Hunter. Natalie Wood. Skip Homeir. Producer Rich- 
ard Whorf. Director Stuart Heisler. Western. Young 
man seeks his brother's murderer. 92 min. 8/20. 

October 

TOWARD THE UNKNOWN WarnerColor. William Hol- 
den, Lloyd Nolan, Virginia Leith. Producer-director 
Mervyn LeRoy. Drama. Test pilots experiment in jet 
and rocket propelled aircraft to probe outer space 
and physical limits of man. 115 min. 10/1. 

November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor Rock Hudson. 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil. cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND. THE Tab Hunter. Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler. Drama. Army turns immature boy into man. 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BABY DOLL Karl Maiden. Carroll Baker. Eli Wallach. 
A Newton Production. Producer-director Elia Kazan 
Drama. Story of 4 gin-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. 114 min. 12/24. 

January 

WRONG MAN. THE Henry Fonda, Vera Miles. Anthony 
Quayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club is prime suspect in 
murder case. 105 min. 1/7. 

February 

TOP SECRET AFFAIR Kirk Douglas, Susan Hayward. 
Producer Martin Rackin. Director H. C. Potter. Come- 
dy. A lovely lady calls the bluff of an Army General. 

Coming 

A FACE IN THE CROWD Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal. 
Producer-director Elia Kazan. Drama. 

BIG LAND, THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd. Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move their herds to 
distant railroads. 

LAFAYETTE ESCADRILLE CinemaScope, WarnerColor. 
Tab Hunter, Etchika Choureau, J. Carrol Naish. Drama. 
NIGHT DOES STRANGE THINGS, THE Technicolor. 
Ingrid Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco- 
London Film. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of 
the exiled widow of a Polish Prince. 

PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, THE Color. Marilyn 
Monroe, Laurence Olivier. Dame Sybil Thorndyke. 
Producer-director Laurence Olivier. Comedy. 
SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, THE CinemaScope. Warner- 
Color. James Stewart. Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director Billy Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlantic in a plane. 



To Better Serve You . . . 

Office & Terminal Combined At 

305 N. 12th St. New Phones 

Philadelphia 7, Pa. LOmbard 3-3944, 3945 

NEW JERSEY 
MESSENGER SERVICE 

Member National Film Carriers 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE! 

HIGHWAY 
EXPRESS LINES, INC. 

Member .Xatior.al Film Carriers 

Philadelphia, Pa.: LOcust 4-34S9 
Washington, D. C: DUcont 7-7200 



Film 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



The word-of-mouth will be TREMENDOUS 



seventeen 



isn't an age . . . 
it's an eternity ... , 
nobody knows you, 
and worse, 
you 

hardly know N 



yourself 



RKO RADIO PICTURES presents 




THE YOUNG STRANGE 



JAMES MacARTHUR • KIM HUNTER • JAMES DALY 1 

JAMES GREGORY • WHIT BIS SELL • JEFF SILVER 1 

Wn««n 62/ ROBERT DOZIER • Produced by STUART MILLAR • Directed 62/ JOHN FRANKENHEIME, 



Another profit show from the NEW RKO 



4fc 

BULLETIN 



F5RUARY 4, 1957 



usiness-wise 
Analysis of 
ie New Films 

Reviews: 

WINGS OF EAGLES 
DP SECRET AFFAIR 

THE BIG LAND 
DIBLE SHRINKING MAN 
THE BIG BOODLE 
E HALLIDAY BRAND 

KELLY AND ME 
THE HAPPY ROAD 
E STEPS TO DANGER 
DT SUMMER NIGHT 
MEN IN WAR 



Tom O'Neil & RKO 

Past, Present* Future 
♦ 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE 



The Teen-age Customer 




With 

flynn 




Viewpoints 

FEBRUARY 4. 1957 * VOLUME 25. NO. 3 



20th-Fox 
Rescue Team 

Twentieth Century-Fox' an- 
nounced campaign to aid the smaller 
theatres and to reopen closed houses 
is an encouraging sign to the entire 
industry. Even if only to demon- 
strate that a major film company is 
aware of the important role the 
small town and sub-run theatres 
play in the distribution picture, the 
project announced by general sales 
manager Alex Harrison would be a 
welcome omen. In view of the cal- 
lous disinterest in the fate of thou- 
sands of small theatres displayed by 
some of the film companies, it comes 
as a fresh breath of hope to little 
exhibition. 

Mr. Harrison spoke in construc- 
tive, albeit general, terms. The first 
move, he said, is a re-examination of 
every small town and subsequent 
run situation by the field sales force. 
This would be followed by local 
level sales-exhibition meetings to 
help solve individual problems and 
lend aid in generating public enthu- 
siasm in moviegoing. 

With no intention to deprecate in 
any way the 20th-Fox drive, it 
should be noted that there have been 
several such gestures by other film 
companies in the past. Each was 
announced with trumpet blasts of 
great intentions, only to peter out in 
mute inaction. Having paid lip- 
service to their small-exhibitor cus- 
tomers, these distributors promptly 
disregarded the basic problems while 
theatres continued to succumb. 

On the basis of its past record of 
providing some of the most effective 
leadership in tackling and solving 
industry problems, however, 20th- 
Fox is likely to be the organization 
that will go beyond gestures and do 
something, if there is something 
that can be done. But whatever is 
planned to help the smaller theatres, 
it must take the form of a definitive 



program, specific in its purpose. And 
it must be backed by a determina- 
tion to see it through. 

20th Century's "rescue team" cer- 
tainly should carry the fervent good 
wishes of the entire industry. The 
thousands of small theatres through- 
out the land are the way stations for 
millions of people in search of enter- 
tainment and relaxation. If these 
links no longer exist, countless po- 
tential moviegoers will seek other 
forms of diversion and, perhaps, for- 
get the wonders of a visit to a movie. 
If 20th Century's mission is accom- 
plished, the company will win its 
own reward, for a healthy theatre is 
a desirable customer. 



Let's Cut 
if AW*/ Bv 

One of the long, long pictures that 
have come out of late has been doing 
very well at the boxoffice. Another 
hasn't. The latter, as a matter of sad 
fact, has been laying an egg in direct 
epic proportion to its length. 

This pointedly gives evidence that 
extreme footage is not an evil per 
se. "Gone With the Wind" will re- 
main a living testimonial to that. 
But what GWTW had, and what 
has made other big and long pictures 
boxoffice giants, are those qualities 
of entertainment — bearing no rela- 



BULLETIN 



Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trade Pacer 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax. Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 123? Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa., LOcust 8-0950. 0951. 
Philip R. Ward. Associate Editor- Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan G. 
Steck, Business Manager; Marvin Schiller, 
Publication Manager; Rooert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: 522 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 36 N Y.. MUrray Hill 2-3631; 
Alf Dinhofer, Editorial Representative. 
Subscription Rates: ONE YEAR S3. 00 
in the U. S.; Canada, S4.00; Europe, 
S5.00. TWO YEARS: S5.00 in the 
U. S.; Canada, $7.50; Europe, S9.00. 



tion to mere length — that provide 
constant emotional impact on the 
audience. When production opul- 
ence and length take precedence 
over the drama, however, much that 
was good in the picture is engulfed 
in the lavishness — and lost. This is 
inductive fact, proved time and 
again, over an era of epics. 

The poor showing of the royal 
egg-layer mentioned above has been 
considered by many theatremen a 
plain case of productionitis — an in- 
flammation of the producer's ego. 
Having lavished such great prodi- 
gality on the production, he couldn't 
bear, it seemed, to chop off such por- 
tions of the footage that would bring 
the finished film into palatable pro- 
portions, even though it would result 
in a greater boxoffice return. A half 
to three quarters of an hour out of 
this film, exhibitors feel, could have 
meant millions at the boxoffice. 

Perhaps the next thought may be 
considered blasphemous by those 
who make movies, but, in view of 
the alleged objective of a commercial 
film to gain the greatest audience 
and make the most money — why 
couldn't each king-size film be sub- 
mitted to a board of expert studio 
editors after the producer is done 
with it? 

Let them go to work with the 
scissors, unburdened by the anguish 
that must overcome the producer 
when he sees a minute of film repre- 
senting thousands of dollars slide to 
the cutting room floor. Then let the 
full version and the edited, stream- 
lined product be submitted to a 
group of test audiences. Their re- 
action would be a valuable guide in 
determining which will spell bigger 
boxoffice. 

It may not be the whole answer to 
bulky, overlong epics. But it could 
go a long way toward preserving 
that portion of the boxoffice that is 
lopped off because a thousand feet 
cf excess film was not. 



Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 3 



Share the good news of 
these M-G-M releases 
just previewed and 
headed for top grosses! 



mm 





THE WINGS OF EAGLES 



PERFECT WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY SHOW will lift grosses sky- 
high! The fastest- booking holiday attraction because John Wayne and 
director John Ford deliver another BIG in-Metrocolor hit (Best since 
their "Quiet Man"). Based on the life of reckless, fun-loving "Spig" 
Wead, Squadron Commander. Dan Dailey, Maureen O'Hara co-star. 

10,000 BEDROOMS 

SONG-FILLED JOYOUS ENTERTAINMENT about a young hotel 
tycoon (Dean Martin's first solo starring role) and four lovely sisters. A 
BIG, happy, romantic, song -studded attraction loaded with beauty and 
talent— in CinemaScope and Metrocolor! Cast includes: Anna Maria 
Alberghetti, Eva Bartok, Dewey Martin, Walter Slezak, Paul Henreid. 



LIZZIE 



»» 



POWERFUL DRAMA! EXPLOITATION NATURAL! It's a sock drama 
for sensational showmanship. It's the story of "the Jekyll and Hyde girl 
who lived three strange lives." Eleanor Parker's performance as three 
different personalities is absorbing. Something different for the fans! 

(A Bryna Production.) 

DESIGNING WOMAN 

TIP-OFF! ONE OF 1957's BIGGEST! Previewed last week. Imme- 
diately the word flashed from Coast to Coast that M-G-M has another 
blockbuster in the "High Society" class. Gregory Peck, Lauren Bacall, 
Dolores Gray in the hilarious, action-packed CinemaScope comedy romance 
in Metrocolor of a designer and a sportswriter. 



THE LITTLE HUT 



AUDIENCE REACTION FORECASTS SENSATION! In its Test-Pre- 
views it has proved itself in advance a smash box-office hit ! Ava Gardner 
in her scanty wardrobe is gorgeous, shipwrecked on a desert island with 
Stewart Granger and David Niven. Sure-fire audience entertainment— in j 
BLUSHING COLOR! (A Herbson, S. A. Production.) 



PUBLICITY LAG. "Too little and too late" is the cry of 
many theatremen in regard to advance buildup for films 
today. They charge this delinquency with being respon- 
sible for the failure of many worthy pictures to do antici- 
pated business. A current case in point is the experience of 
"'Friendly Persuasion". This delightful William Wyler 
production is reportedly just beginning to show its true 
boxoffice strength in subsequent runs, after a disappoint- 
ing performance in most first run situations. Multiple key 
run bookings, bolstered by joint promotion effort, are 
bringing in grosses relatively far above those shown in the 
first run engagements. Exhibitors contend that the same 
has been true of many other fine films; they just begin to 
catch on with the public about the time when the late runs 
are offering them. One prominent theatreman spoke the 
opinion of many when he declared: "The trouble is that 
the film producers in this day do not give their publicity 
and advertising staffs enough time to develop full-scale ad- 
vance campaigns on a picture. All too often important pic- 
tures are rushed into first runs with hardly any advance 
publicity, and the ad men are pressed to turn out a 'smash 
campaign' within a matter of a couple days. And this 
trouble even applies to their selling to exhibitors them- 
selves. Features are often offered to my buyers and book- 
ers without a single ad having appeared in a trade paper. 
How are we to go out and sell the pictures to the public if 
they haven't been sold to us!" 

0 

WHITHER RKO? The ink is hardly dry on the RKO- 
Universal pact and some students of the situation are ready 
to wager that no future RKO-produced pictures will go to 
U-I for distribution. Tom O'Neil, they say, made the de- 
cision in haste to close down his exchanges under the 
duress of a mounting debt, but it is reported that he al- 
ready has misgivings about the wisdom of the deal. It's in 
the cards, distribution experts contend, that O'Neil will be 
disappointed in the returns that will be forthcoming from 
Universal. The RKO product, they say, is bound to re- 
ceive "step-child" treatment. This conclusion is based on 
the assumption that the U-I sales force, handling a full 
complement of their own wholly-owned product, will hard- 
ly be in position to scratch out the best terms and playing 
time for RKO's films. They fully expect O'Neil to adopt 
some other method for distribution of RKO's future out- 
put. Most likely plan: a limited sales staff (on the order 
of Buena Vista's), with physical service and billing 
handled by National Film Carriers. 

O 

ZANUCK'S POSITION. Insiders will tell you to discount 
those rumors that Darryl F. Zanuck might hook up with 
Howard Hughes to take control of 20th-Fox. The former 



What Tfiey'te hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



studio chief, who now is operating as an independent pro- 
ducer, has very close ties with a strong sentimental attach- 
ment for Spyros Skouras, whose showmanship, Zanuck 
believes, is unmatched in the industry. As for the un- 
fathomable Hughes and his current interest in 20th stock, 
Wall Streeters see nothing but an investment motive. 
They point out that if he were seeking control of a film 
company, there are others far more vulnerable than 20th- 
Fox. 

0 

COLOR TV. Despite all the pressures applied to sell color 
television, the fact remains that it has been a big bust so 
far. RCA is reported to have lost some $6 million pushing 
tinted TV, with only a comparative handful of sets pur- 
chased by a wary and reluctant public. Wall Street reports 
indicate that the heat is on Gen. David Sarnoff, RCA boss, 
who plumped so hard for color. Advertising people would 
like to see their products displayed on TV in all their re- 
splendent packages, but Mr. John Q. Public can't be en- 
ticed to lay out some $400 for a new set. Television is 
learning what the movie people have long known: while 
color is a definite plus-factor, it has never been accepted as 
a substitute for quality entertainment. A good show in 
black and white will always outdraw an inferior one in 
color. 

0 

LOEWS BOARD CHAIRMAN. The revised by-laws of 
the Loew organization may make no provision for a suc- 
cessor to the board chairman spot vacated by Arthur M. 
Loew, Jr., but insiders expect that if and when the spot is 
filled, it will not go to Joseph Tomlinson, the fighting dis- 
sident and reputably largest single stockholder. They say 
that the inclination of other large stockholders, who were 
not directly in his camp, is to have a more neutral board 
head. 

0 

NO MERGER. Prospects that there might be a merger of 
Allied and TOA are dimmer now than they were a few 
months ago. While Allied will adopt a more conciliatory 
course in its relations with the film companies, and proba- 
bly work closely with TOA in seeking reforms, the inde- 
pendent organization leadership feels that it must retain 
self-determination to follow a different and tougher course 
if the distributors fail to correct certain trade practices. 
Some elements in Allied lean toward uniting with the 
other national group, but there remains a hard core of firm 
independents, who insist that a merger could only mean 
that Allied would be swallowed up by TOA. 



Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 5 



DARWIN COMES TO MOVIEDOM. Adapt or die- 
that is the dire dictum of evolution. To play this little 
game of craps with Mother Nature you obey some rather 
rigid rules. Grow antlers, if need be. Sprout feathers, if 
you must. Indeed, forsake even your egg-laying habits for 
more advanced avenues of procreation, if the fates so in- 
voke — but by all means make your peace, as best you can, 
with an unfriendly and perilous environment. 

Just how successfully moviedom has evolved in the two 
score years since it wiggled, tremorously, out of the ooze 
and the brine to take its place among the profit-seeking 
creatures of the field is open to speculation. 

Moviedom's central environment is the marketplace. To 
some extent it has artfully survived the terrors of that un- 
holy ground. From an unlovely starveling that flickered in- 
stead of flowed, the film medium has grown smooth and 
silky. It has waxed higher, wider and more comely. It 
has acquired a handsome coloration, as well as an organ 
of speech. The acquisition of a brain and a foresight is 
again a speculative issue. 

0 

An examination of the current condition of the movie 
enterprise would indicate evolution has been only a some- 
time thing. For this, thanks must go the industry's woeful 
inertia in the face of sudden change. So long as environ- 
ment remains tranquil and constant, moviedom does fine. 
Otherwise it falls to pieces. The entry of television into 
the marketplace rendered moviedom as hopelessly be- 
fuddled as the pin-brained dinosaur in its time of testing. 
Nature ordered that specie extinct. 

Evidence of how miserably moviedom has failed to adapt 
to the modern environment is manifest in today's news. 
With the rise of TV, film company earnings have sagged 
to mere subsistence levels, in some cases figures reminis- 
cent of income totals of the sad 1930s. Cinema security 
prices have dipped in sympathy (see Film BULLETIN 
Cinema Aggregate below). Production by major studios is 
following a five year trend of atrophication, as nervous film 
makers assess their dwindling counting houses. 

O 

On more specific fronts, Loew's Leo, once the mightiest 
creature of them all, is squealing like a pussy cat, counting 
its blessings for escaping — maybe, just maybe — a tooth 
and fang battle for internal control. Indeed, there are 
whispers, incredible as they seem, of a possible liquidation 
within a year presided over by Loew's newly proposed 
slate of directors. Republic Pictures, with theatre film 
production at a standstill, is up for grabs. RKO has cast 
off its distribution system to lighten the burden. Produc- 
tionwise that company is barely limping along. Two other 
film companies, one a long-time giant, are being covetously 
studied by elements able, if not immediately willing, to 
take command. Among some firms diversification in out- 
side fields is pulling the oars, while in others proxy con- 
tests are avoided by the fortunate circumstance of control 
being vested in management. 

0 

Only United Artists seems to have made a genuinely 
effective adaptation to the recent environment. Sensing 
the tax-prompted rise in independent production, UA 
strived furiously to capitalize upon this sudden shift in the 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 



FEBRUARY 



By Philip R. Ward 

wind. 20th-Fox made a gallant try to meet new conditions 
with CinemaScope, and enjoyed, albeit temporary, success. 
To its credit, the Skouras management of that company is 
always alert and eager to meet circumstances. Other com- 
panies, however, revel in atrophy, resist change, resent the 
very suggestion that the old order changeth. 

What is the answer? Evolution's uncompromising man- 
date remains: adapt and survive, fail and perish. From 
this it follows that even the once mighty shall tumble b 1 
the wayside and be weeded out, lest they thoroughly re- 
cant the luxury of standing pat. The marketplace brooks 
no sentimentality. Its decisions are swift and final. Un- 
happily, this stringent environment appears too much for 
an important complement of film companies and person- 
nel alike. 

What is most likely transpiring even now — and the 
symptoms are there for the looking — is a gradual over- 
hauling of both firms and personnel. In practical terms 
this means some consolidation of facilities and resources, 
a sifting of the manpower. What remains will be a hard, 
hearty, spirited, adaptable new industry that will have 
grown a new set of feathers to meet the terms of its new 
environment. Only thus can it survive. 

O O 

THE LONG ROAD BACK. The Cinema Aggregate of 
Film BULLETIN — charted below — reports industry 
stocks up in January; film companies gaining 5^4 points, 
theatre companies, 2y 8 . Some measure of the distance the 
Aggregate must travel to make up lost ground is had by 
contrasting January's close with those of the years 1954 
and 1955. In '55 the FB Aggregate ended with a reading 
of 158 J /2 for film companies, 37 for theatre companies. The 
'54 close reported 178V 2 for film companies, 40^4 for thea- 
tre companies. The January, 1957 close reads: 136^ for 
film companies, 33^g for theatre companies. 

Film BULLETIN Cinema Aggregate * 



FILM COMPANIES THEATRE COMPANIES 

' Composed of carefully selected representative industry issues. 



Page 6 Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 




An important statement 
about 



20th Century-Fox's 
JANUARY-THRU-EASTER 




20tkCCftIuAXL-Fb5d in announcing its 
release schedule for the first four months of 
1957, reaffirms its great faith in the future 
of our industry as expressed by our Presi- 
dent, Spyros P. Skouras, in his recent state- 
ment that we must "lead through strength." 

This is only the beginning. Our program is 
ambitious, but simple. We will release one 
important new box-office attraction every 
week of 1957. Every one of these pictures 
will be as successful a creation and as com- 
mercial a product as we can make it. 

We are pouring into this line-up talent, skill, 
energy and experience. Each release will be 
pre-sold by hard-hitting advertising and 
widely-penetrating publicity. 

These are challenging days for our business. 
But it is our thinking at 20th that vigor, 
imagination and merchandising will do the 
job. We know we have the most of the best 
pictures in our entire history, and we face 
the future with confidence and enthusiasm. 




ALEX HARRISON 
General Sales Manager 




tres are rocking! 
s one is rolling I 



IE GIRL CAN'T 

ELP it iflrS 

I 



OLOR by OB LUXE 

NemaScOPE 

JAYNE 8 EOMOND 

ELL • MANSFIELD • O'BRIEN 

ed and Oirected by 

NK TASHLIN 

TASHLIN HERBERT BAKER 




wed 0/ 3// fief/on, /ejjeni/, //w/ 

HE TRUE STORY 
IF JESSE JAMES 

COLOR by OE LUXE 

.INemaScoP£ 



The story that had to win the Pulitzer Prize! 

THREE BRAVE MEN 

C I N e ; :< .pt O , 

RAY ERNEST 

MILLAND • 60RGNINE 

Produced b» Directed ano written 'or DM Sen 

HERBERT B. SWOPE, Jr. . PHILIP DUNNE 



Heartwarming story of youth and adventure! 



SMILEY 




COLOR BY TECHNICOLOR 

OnemaScoPE: ^**» 

starring 

RALPH JOHN "CHIPS" 

RICHARDSON • McCALLUM • RAFFERTY 

ami deducing COLIN PETERSEN as "Smiley" 

Produced and Directed by ANTHONY KIMMINS 
Screenplay by 

MOORE RAYMOND and ANTHONY KIMMINS 

A London Film Released by 20th Centuryfoi 



A cast of stars in 
Broadway's smash comedy hit! 

OH, MEN! 
OH, WOMEN! I 

COLOR by OE LUXE 

CINemaScoPE 

starring 

DAN GINGER DAVID 

DAILEY. ROGERS • NIYEN 

BARBARA TONY 

RUSH • RANDALL 

Produced and Directed by 

NUNNALLY JOHNSON 



The surprise romantic comedy of the year! 

TWO GROOMS m 
FOR A BRIDE |^ r " 




starring 

VIRGINIA 



JOHN 



BRUCE* CARROLL 

Produced by ROBERT S. BAKER ..o MONTY BERMAN 

Directed by Screenplay by 

HENRY CASS- FREDERICK STEPHANI 



Adventurers for hire in exciting Morocco! 

OASIS 



I 




IN EASTMAN COLOR VM 

CinemaScopE 

starring \u P 

MICHELE PIERRE ^* 

MORGAN • BRASSEUR 

w,th CORNELL BORCHERS 

Educed by LUGGI WALDLEITNER 
and GERD OSWALD 

Screen Adaptation by 

JOSEPH and GEORGES KESSEL *j[ 



The star of "The King and I"! 

The director of "The African Queen"! 

HEAVEN KNOWS, 
MR. ALLISON 

COLOR by DE LUXE 

CiNemaScoPEz 

starring 

DEBORAH ROBERT 

KERR • MITCHUM 

Produced by 

BUDDY ADLER and EUGENE FRENKE 

Directed by 

JOHN HUSTON 

Screenplay by 

JOHN LEE MAHIN and JOHN HUSTON 



The unforgettable story of the men of the West! 

THE STORM RIDER 

RioalScom 

starring 

SCOTT MALA BILL 

BRADY* POWERS- WILLIAMS 

Produced by Directed by 

BERNARD GLASSER • EDWARD BERNDS 

Screenplay by EDWARD BERNDS and DON MARTIN i 



• 






BE 



■ 



r he strangest story to emerge from the war! 

SEA WIFE ^ 



:olor by oc luxe 

DnemaScoPE 



COLLINS • BURTON 



BASIL 

SYDNEY 



Produced by Directed by 

VNDRE HAKIM • BOB McNAUGHT yj 

icreenplay by GEORGE K. BURKE 





Offbeat drama of mounting suspense! 

BREAK IN 
THE CIRCLE 

starring 

FORREST EVA MARIUS 

TUCKER • BARTOK - GORING 

Produced by Directed by 

MICHAEL CARRERAS • VAL GUEST 

Screenplay by VAL GUEST 



Powerful secret story of wartime Hong Kong! 

CHINA GATE 

GnemaScoP^ 

ring 

NAT 6ENE 

"KING" COLE- BARRY 

Produced. Directed and Written tor the Screen by 

SAMUEL FULLER 

A Globe Enterprises Production 
Released by 20th Century-Foi 





The thrill package of the year! 


A boxoffice blockbuster! 




SHE DEVIL TENTATIVE TITLE) 


starring 




MARI JACK ALBERT 


BLANCHARD -KELLY • DEKKER <J 


Produced and Directed by 




KURT NEUMANN 




Screenplay by 




CARROLL YOUNG m KURT NEUMANN ' 






KRONOS h 


Hi 


starring 




JEFF BARBARA 


JOHN 


MORROW- LAWRENCE* EMERY 


Produced and Directed by 




KURT NEUMANN 




Screenplay by 




LAWRENCE LOUIS GOLDMAN 






UD THROUGH STRENGTH - s.p.s. 



Tom O'Neil 
&RK0 

PaM t pteMHt Juture 

by LEONARD COULTER 

Sometimes a man falls prisoner to his own dreams. It 
was a buoyant, confident Thomas F. O'Neil who, a year 
and a-half ago, moved into the control of RKO Radio Pic- 
tures. 

He had just closed what looked like a sugarplum deal. 
For $25,000,000 he had bought a company for which 
Hughes had previously refused $50,000,000 or more. 

His own words, uttered at that time, reflected his 
optimism : 

"I heard a great deal, long before I met Mr. Hughes, 
about possible liquidation of RKO by various groups 
which, it was said, were anxious to acquire the company 
for a quick sale of its properties, after which they would 
allow it to disintegrate. 

"It quickly became apparent to me . . . that Mr. Hughes 
was not interested in such a deal. Moreover, we became 
convinced that there was a large and growing market for 
fine films for theatrical distribution . . . 

"We confirmed . . . that the company's film backlog 
could be acquired for television only if RKO was pur- 
chased as a film business, and maintained as such. Ac- 
cordingly, I wrote a letter to Mr. Howard Hughes stating 
that if our conversations matured, we would be prepared 
to take over RKO in its existing posture; that is to say, to 
operate it as a unit for producing and distributing films for 
theatrical release. While the letter does not form part of 
the legal contract, I regard it as being binding upon us. 

"Mr. Hughes himself had insisted all along that he was 
opposed to the break-up of RKO Radio Pictures because 
it would cause widespread distress and unemployment, and 
would accentuate the film shortage. I think a great deal of 
credit is due to him for that humanitarian stand . . . 

"We shall maintain it as a going concern, because we 
feel it can stand on its own feet and thrive in its own mar- 




"We have a right to operate our business as 
efficiently as it can be run . . . Our wove was 
motivated almost by desperation . . . We figure 
that somewhere along the line we will be able to 
evolve a new way of distributing pictures . . ." 




ket . . . We intend to use this great opportunity to con- 
tinue and increase RKO's role in the important theatrical 
release field . . . Any changes we introduce will be primari- 
ly with the object of establishing ourselves permanently 
in the film business . . . 

"Our expansion in that field is. we feel, a far more com- 
pelling job than releasing backlog films for television. I 
think we shall have all the money we need for making 
pictures." 

That was the Tom O'Neil of July, 1955, firmly convinced 
that he was on the threshold of a great new career as the 
guiding light of a great film producing company which 
might even out-Metro Metro itself. 

Wizard of Oz 

To say that now, some eighteen months later, Tom 
O'Neil is a chastened man would be an exaggeration, but 
there isn't much doubt he is a much wiser one now and, 
perhaps, even a little disappointed. For the job of reviving 
RKO as a top film producer hasn't been as easy as it 
looked. Nor has the early expectation of a quick and hand- 
some profit come to pass. 

To those unfamiliar with the complexities of present-day 
corporate finance it looked for all the world, back in the 
summer of 1955, that Mr. O'Neil was about to be unveiled 
as a financial Wizard of Oz. The all-too-simple arithmetic 
scribbled on bar-room napkins at that time went something 
like this : Cash paid for RKO : $25,000,000. Received from 
Howard Hughes on the sale back to him of two feature 

(Continued on Page 17) 



Page 12 Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 



PATTERNS DP PATRDNAIiK 
ii 



Cxclu^e BULLETIN Jutm 



The Teen-age Customer 



By LEONARD SPINRAD 
The younger generation has always been a favorite tar- 
get for its elders. It is a target for criticism and a target 
for business. The motion picture industry, like so many 
other enterprises, gets many headaches and many dollars 
from the teen-aged trade. Of all the various types of cus- 
tomer who come into the movie theatre, none can match 
the adolescent in enthusiastic impulse buying, response to 
promotional stimuli or unpredictable explosiveness. 

Many theatre owners insist that ado'escent patronage is 
just not worth the hazards. They cite repeated instances 
i of vandalism, rowdy behavior and general wear and tear. 
And yet they face the fact that no single age group is near- 
ly as important for the long term future cf motion picture 
exhibition as the teen-ager. 

Not only because of their adolescent impressionableness 
and the fact that they have free time and money to spend, 
but also because there are more of them all the time, the 
teen-agers are the customer reservoir. Just consider a few 
perhaps startling statistics about them. 

This year's 16-year-olds come from a crop of 2,500,000 
babies born in 1941. The 16-year-olds who reach that noble 
age in 1959 wiil come from a crop of 2,930,000; and in years 
further ahead the field continues to grow. (This, thanks 
to geriatrics, will also be true of people beyond middle 
age; but it takes no genius to perceive that no matter how 
j much get-up-and-go the oldsters have, they will never 
match the dynamic energies of their grandchildren.) 




TEEN-AGERS ARE PEOPLE 



The statesmen of the motion picture industry, moreover, 
looking beyond the teen-ager's immediate box office dollar, 
like to think that the adolescent who becomes accustomed 
to going to the movies regularly in his teens will remain a 
fairly loyal patron in his more mature years, and will pass 
some degree of the habit on to the children he raises. How 
far this projection can be carried is pure speculation, but 
we are certainly better off with a moviegoing generation 
than without it. 

There is one gaping hole in this entire area of thinking, 
however; and it is a defect which has been virtually ig- 




nored in the industry's public thought about the adolescent 
audience. The simple fact is that the so-calied adolescent 
audience is not quite that well defined. It isn't a single 
cohesive audience at all. 



Teen-agers have fads in common, and sloppy clothes in 
common and good and bad habits in common, but teen- 
agers are people. People come in all shapes, sizes, men- 
talities and tastes — and teen-agers offer the full variety. 

The problem of delinquency is the perfect illustration. 
No theatre manager, including many whose houses are 
most afflicted with juvenile miscreants, would contend that 
all cr even a majority of teen-agers are delinquents. Many 
theatre men report that the problem girls are far more of a 
headache than the boys; but can you turn this into a gen- 
eralization about girl teen-agers? 

A minority of juveniles is responsible for the delinquency 
reputation. (Delinquency itself deserves separate discus- 
sion later on.) By the same token, only fractional portions 
of the teen-age public are rock and roll fanatics, or incur- 
able romantics or what have you. 

It is only in the past decade or so that we have taken to 
regarding the teen-age market as a unit; we didn't make 
the mistake previously because there was no great need to 
pinpoint our audience. Individual pictures, in the pre-wsr 
area, were less important and the entire annual block of 
product of a company was the thing. Also, market and sta- 

( Continued ,m Page 14) 



Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 13 



THE TEEN-AGE CUSTOMER 

Purvnts. Tvtichvrs., iJivrgy Exert lnflin'iiff 



(Continued from Page 13) 

tistical research had not yet been developed to their pres- 
ent degree. Finally, before the war we still regarded movie- 
going as a family institution, with much less separate 
ticket-buying by young teen-agers. 

If teen-agers do not all have the same tastes and inter- 
ests, they nevertheless in the main have certain psycho- 
logical attributes which are characteristic of their age. 
They are impulse creatures, given to periodic overwhelm- 
ing enthusiasms. They are hero worshippers who need a 
change of hero every thousand miles. They are at a point 
when they both want and at the same time reject parental 
guidance and are at least passively resentful of discipline. 

Thus certain points emerge in considering the teen-age 
motion picture market. First, the producer of motion pic- 
tures must bear in mind that today's teen-age enthusiasm 
is apt to be tomorrow's old hat. Rock and roll has been at 
a relatively brief peak ; from the motion picture point of 
view, it must be regarded as near the end of the teen-age 
road. This does not mean teen-agers no longer rock and 
no longer roll to the music of a local combo or a new 
record (although the music business now sees other types 
of melody replacing r and r at the top of the list) ; it means 
that when the time comes for a teen ager to plunk down 
money at a theatre box office, he may think twice. The 
rhythms available via television or the local juke joint may 
now suffice to satisfy his down-from-the-peak appetite. 

For the exhibitor, faced with the sharp ups and downs 
of the teen age crazes, the marketing problem becomes one 
of spot exploitation. More than with pictures for the adult 
or entire family audience, films booked with an eye to the 
teen-age trade have to be intensively exploited in a rela- 
tively short period of time. Twentieth Century Fox's satu- 
ration handling of Elvis Presley's debut in "Love Me 
Tender" was an excellent example of this technique on the 
distributive and exhibition level. 



MANY PROBLEMS, TO CONSIDER 



Second, as the personal history of teen-age favorites for 
a long time has shown, the teen-ager's enthusiasm can be 
used to build a broader base of audience loyalty. Frank 
Sinatra was a teen-age girls' dreamboat in his first blaze 
of glory as an entertainer, but he achieved far more lasting 
stature when he captured the loyalty of the older night- 
club and moviegoing public as an actor-singer. Many 
other entertainers have accomplished the same transition 
— and in the process they often recapture as fans many of 
the erptwhile teen-agers who have grown up with them. 

There are certain pitfalls in appealing to teen-age audi- 
ences. One of which the motion picture industry must al- 
ways be conscious is the question of good taste. Fringe 
elements in our industry — as in the publishing, phonograph 
and even clothing businesses — sometimes pander to ado- 
lescent sex curiosity, at the expense of the industry's repu- 
tation. Sometimes, respectable theatres fail properly to 
police their audiences for troublemakers among teen-agers, 



and find as a result that the bad teen-agers have driven the 
good ones out of circulation. 

Much has been written about the growing independence 
of the adolescent. He is still, however, an adolescent, sus- 
ceptible to the weighty influence of home, church and 
school. Sometimes one or more of these influences may be 
negligible, but as a general rule they are fairly potent. 
Therefore, the lines of communication between the motion 
picture industry and the home, church and school must 
constantly be tended, in order that the impetus toward 
moviegoing shall be sustained and encouraged. 

Positive promotional and educational efforts by motion 
picture companies and theatres serve a continuing purpose, 
of course. But it must also be borne in mind that if a 
parent, or a teacher, or a minister is repelled by particular 
aspects of motion pictures he is liable to exert his influence 
in opposition to teen-age ticket buying. Many teen-agers 
will go to the movies anyway; many, representing ad- 
ditional millions of dollars in ticket sales, will not. 




Parents are the most important influence. This is not 
necessarily because they are the most persuasive, although 
that may be true. It is basically because they are the only 
ones likely to have any control of teen-age purse strings. 
Many teen-agers work for their spending money these 
days; but most still are taking an allowance from pop. 

This brings us to the question of whether parents, as a 
general rule, are giving sufficient encouragement to teen- 
age moviegoing. Or, to put it differently, are they offering 
sufficiently small opposition to the natural moviegoing in- 
clinations of their offspring? 

The answer is not completely satisfactory. It is a matter 
of fact that in many communities parents are endeavoring 
to find diversions to replace moviegoing for their teen- 
age children. 

While no great body of statistical information is avail- 
able on the subject, most movie people have encountered 
a couple of familiar comments by parents which are re- 
vealing. One is that "it costs so much for the kids to go to 
the movies these days." The other is that "they get such 
crummy kids at the theatres." Let it quickly be noted that 
neither comment is so widespread as to constitute an epi- 



Page 14 Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 



THE TEEN-AGE CUSTOMER 



Hau- Tu Ut'tit with l)vliitqiu>iils 



demic ; but they can be regarded as symptoms of some im- 
portant problems. 

The behavior, costume and general reputation of teen- 
agers at the movies are not as good as they might be. This 
is true for teen-agers in school, too, or in any other place 
where they gather in groups. But they have to go to 
school. The movies are optional. 

One of the problems about the obnoxious teen-age 
moviegoer is that he may discourage ten adult moviegoers 
from coming back to the theatre. Another problem is that, 
to keep out one adolescent problem child, the theatre finds 
it necessary to bar ten suspected juveniles, or even to bar 
teen-agers completely. And this moves our industry prob- 
lem right out of our industry into the general public arena. 

Several different approaches to the problem of juvenile 
delinquency have been tried by theatres, and by the gov- 
ernment. One is to hire extra police protection; another is 
to bar suspected trouble makers; a third is to hold parents 
responsible. How have they worked? 



•GET TOUGH" POLICY PAYS OFF 



In Washington, Ind., theatre manager A. J. Kalberer 
found that a "get tough" policy was the answer, despite all 
the previous efforts of school officials, PTA groups and so 
forth. "We have had teenage gangs of 14 and 15 year old 
boys wait for us to beat us up. They didn't, however, for 
once you single out one of the gang, back him up and show 
him you are not afraid of his threats, the whole gang will 
eventually talk themselves out and call it off ... In the 
beginning it was necessary to bar from 20 to 30 teenagers 
from the theatre. In the space of a year (author's note : as 
of mid-1954) we have cut this down to five or six. These 
will probably never be permitted in the theatre. The 
others, after a month or so of probation during which time 
they sign in and out and sit in sections designed for them, 
turn over a new leaf." 

A number of theatres with balconies insist that teen 
agers sit in the orchestra where they can be more closely 
observed. In Oklahoma City cut-rate tickets for students 
depend on their good behavior. In various cities managers 
have adopted a policy of advising parents first and then, if 
no satisfaction is obtained, calling the police. The latter 
step is very rarely necessary, theatre men say. But only a 
month or so ago irate parents of Baytown, Texas, feuded 
with police because over 50 teen-agers were arrested for 
bombarding a theatre with eggs and feathers. The parents 
finally paid for the damage and the children were freed. 

A few generalizations from the observations of theatre 
managers help to put the teen-ager in box office focus. The 
Independent Theatre Owners of Ohio suggest that the 
clothes a youngster wears have an effect on how they act 
in the theatre. Some theatres, accordingly, have banned 
what might best be described as delinquent-looking garb 
for their teen-age customers. Up in Kenmore, N.Y., man- 
ager William Brett found it necessary in 1955 to report 
that "we now stop all youngsters at the door and search 




them to see if they have any knives concealed in their 
clothing." Says another manager: "Kids today have too 
much freedom and too much money to spend." Kansas 
City showmen back in 1953 suggested that the industry 
tell the public to "Take your children to the show instead 
of sending them." 

In all the foregoing instances, one paramount need 
emerges. You really can't do a thing about the behavior 
of juvenile patrons without an adequate staff of ushers 
and, if need be, special police. The need is particularly 
crucial among big-city theatres with varying patronage, 
where trouble makers may be strangers rather than recog- 
nizable local neighborhood patrons. 



WEED OUT HOODLUM ELEMENT 



One difficult problem, which complicates matters con- 
siderably, is that the pictures aimed at the so-called teen- 
age market are apt to appeal among teen-agers principally 
to the hoodlum element. This is why a rock and roll opus 
is regarded by some managers as a more risky attraction 
than a more adult science fiction presentation, for instance. 

It is futile to discuss the teen-age market without recog- 
nizing the general responsibility of society — rather than an 
individual theatre manager — to do something about the 
small minority of teen-aged hoodlums and vandals. But it 
is perhaps good business for the individual theatre man- 
ager to see that hoodlums and vandals in his theatre are 
adequately and publicly dealt with. The emphasis here 
may be on the word publicly. 

For a long time, in the downtown first-run theatres of 
many key cities, juvenile delinquency has been a problem 
never to be discussed in public, for fear that the word 
would get out to the ticket buyers. To say that this is 
naive is not enough. Any theatre patron who has ever 
encountered the peg-pants hoodlums in Times Square the- 
atres, undoubtedly, needs nobody else to tell him they 
exist. But if this same patron somehow knew that the 
saff of ushers was sufficient to keep order — and if he 
stopped seeing hoodlums in the theatres — he might come 
back more often himself, and let his children go to the 
movies more often too. 

(Continued on Page 18) 



Film BULLETIN February 4. 1957 Page 15 




It means HOLDOVERS and 
RECORD BUSINESS everywhere 

even outgrossing 'The Glenn Miller Story" and 
"Magnificent Obsession" in many engagements. 



Los Angeles; Pittsburgh/Washington, IXC.; New 
Orleans; Chicago; Baltimore; ^Hladelphia^Toronto 

Wichita; Salt Lake City; Berkeley, Calif.; New York City 



Buffalo; Albany; Miami; Sacramento; Minneapolis; San Diego; 
Birmingham; Jacksonville; Allentown, Pa.; Lancaster, Pa.; Atlantic City; 
Oklahoma City; Stamford, Conn.; Winnipeg, Manitoba. 

Detroit; Houston; Atlanta; Seattle; Tulsa; Utica; Syracuse; Schenectady, N. Y.; 
Portland, Ore.; Kansas City; Richmond, Va.; Cleveland; Wilmington, Del.; Savannah, Ga.; 
Springfield, Mass.; Memphis; Rockford, III.; Grand Rapids, Mich.; Johnstown, Pa.; Bay 
City, Mich.; Wheeling, W. Va.; Lima, O.; Parkersburg, W. Va.; — and dozens more! 




fatten 

the 




JUST FOR THE KfCOKD 



ROCK HUDSON • LAUREN BACALL 
ROBERT STACK- DOROTHY MALONE 



ROBERT KEITH • GRANT WILLIAMS 



Directed by 

DOUGLAS SIRK 



Screenplay by 

GEORGE ZUCKERMAN 



HARRY SHANNON 

Produced by 

ALBERT ZUGSM1TH 



"^=J=^- ^\T^<^7k2l 422PMC= 

=F R*«K J, A « MtRW = pICTU RES 445 PARK AVE= 

^DELIVER UNIVERSAL THIS CASE "E DO 

—DEAR FRANK ; OOST ™™^Z^ ^ 

«»" J " TO PUV THE ,0V THEATRE AOVAH0E ^ 
PIC TURE EVER TO COMPANY P-S- 



DO 



TOM O'NEIL S, RKO 



lh-,,1 with U-M 

(Continued from Page 12) 

films: $8,000,000. Received from (or promised by) Matty 
Fox's C&C Super Corporation on the lease for TV pur- 
poses of some 750 pre-1948 films: $15,200,000. Total ex- 
penditure: $25,000,000; total receipts: $23,200,000. Net 
cost of the RKO business (including its 14-acre Gower 
Street studio and the smaller Pathe studio in Culver City, 
plus picture-making plant, equipment, properties, a nation- 
al network of exchanges, several major films already "in 
the can" and the whole of RKO's TV backlog) : $1,800,000. 

For a paltry $1,800,000, so it was made to appear, Tom 
O'Neil had become possessed of a thriving orchard heavy 
with fruit ripe for the plucking. And on all sides could be 
heard the awesome whisper, "How did he do it?" 

What all these amateur financiers forgot in their calcu- 
lations was, for one thing, the fact that for years RKO, 
saddled with enormous overhead expenses, had been losing 
a fortune. For another, Tom O'Neil had borrowed right, 
left and sideways in order to buy the business, assuming 
heavy interest obligations in the process, and mortgaging 
the assets he had acquired. 

If, by some magic stroke of business genius, O'Neii and 
his carefully-selected aides could have quickly stopped the 
onrushing tide of fiscal losses inherited from Howard 
Hughes, the RKO story today would be very different 
from the tale recently unfolded. But the losses shown dur- 
ing the company's previous regime continued under the 
O'Neil management: $4,500,000 in 1955, $1,500,000 in 1956. 

Why? Partly because — according to Mr. O'Neil himself 
— the company's new owners had only a few new pictures 
in stock when they moved in. They had to spend millions 
building up a backlog so that they could announce to the 
trade a steady schedule of releases big enough to take care 
of costs and overheads. And partly because those costs 
and overheads were appallingly high. 

An Archaic System 

By the end of 1956 Tom O'Neil decided it was high time 
to review his position. The picture his accountants pre- 
sented fcr his inspection was not a pretty one. Under the 
archaic, outmoded system of selling and distribution which 
had grown up within the industry, the profit rate was pure- 
ly marginal. Of every dollar received at the box-office, 
RKO's statisticians estimated, 94 cents represented costs of 
distribution. Clearly such a situation could not be allowed 
to continue. 

A swift calculation produced another startling financial 
fact: if RKO had not been burdened with its 32 exchanges 
and branch offices and their personnel of about 750, the 
company could have saved last year about $4,000,000. It 
couid have stemmed its enervating losses. Yet how could 
a film company remain in business without getting its 
product into the market? 

The idea finally accepted by Tom O'Neil and his asso- 
ciates was that there should be a stopgap arrangement 
with another film company — if one could be found — to dis- 



###f r<i Ha rya i n 

tribute on a profit-sharing basis those RKO films which 
had already been completed and which might otherwise 
"go sour" in the vault. 

One man was willing to taik business along these lines, 
Milton R. Rackmil, President of Universal. The discus- 
sions dragged on for some weeks. Rackmil drove a hard 
bargain indeed. No official disclosure of the terms was 
made, but O'Neil himself has admitted the percentage in 
some cases goes as high as 50 per cent. For Universal, 
with plenty of product of its own coming along, there was 
clearly no call for undue generosity to O'Neil. Rackmil 
agreed to give RKO the privilege of discussing sales policy 
on each picture involved in the deal, but ruled it quite im- 
practicable to submit each exhibitor contract to RKO for 
approval. 

The deal meant, as far as Universal was concerned, that 
without additional cost it had obtained a few supplementa- 
ry pictures which its sales force could use as bargaining 
counters with bookers. As to its benefits to RKO, O'Neil 
claimed, immediately the deal was signed, it would reduce 
the fixed domestic overhead on each of the pictures in- 
volved by perhaps 53 per cent, which saving could be used 
for making further films. To anyone familiar with the busi- 
ness of selling pictures, however, it was obvious that 
RKO's were unlikely to get the best of the terms in any 
such set-up. 

With this far from splendiferous contract in his pocket 
Tom O'Neil announced the closing of RKO's exchanges, 
the dismissal of most of their staffs, and a trimming to its 
bare bones of the company's publicity department. 

Why the Rumor? 

Rumors that the company was heading for liquidation 
had by this time been set in motion in California. O'Neil 
was furious — not, he explained, because of their nature, but 
because they had apparently been started by one cf How- 
ard Hughes' former minions. The inference, presumably, 
was that this talkative gentlemen had become intrigued by 
the idea that if things could be made to look bad enough 
for RKO Mr. Hughes might again become interested in 
buying the business back — at the right price, of course. 

"We're not liquidators", cried Mr. O'Neil angrily. "In 
fact, we have just executed five-year contracts for Daniel 
O'Shea (RKO President), William Dozier (Studio Chief) 
and Walter Branson (Sales Director). We're going to 
make fi'ms mid-way between the so-called big picture and 
the little picture. We'll make between eight to ten cf them 
this coming year. They will be designed as "A" pictures 
and will reDresent more investment than the 13 we made 
in 1956. 

"We are not intending ", O'Neil said, "to withdraw from 
the financing of independent production; in fact, we are 
now prepared to finance it 100 per cent. 

"We are not interested in taking over a business and 

(Continued on Page 18) 



Film BULLETIN February A, 1957 Page 17 



TDM D'NEIL S, RKO 

(Continued from Page 17) 

liquidating it; we simply feel we have a right to operate 
our business as efficiently as it can be run. If we had not 
entered into the agreement with Universal we would have 
endangered our whole operation. Our move was motivated 
almost by desperation." 

Other O'Neilisms: 

"We figure that somewhere along the line we will be 
able to evolve a new way of distributing pictures. We al- 
ready have some ideas, but nothing final." 

"As regards future pictures, we are interested in talking 
to any distributors who are interested. Universal wanted 
to make a deal for our new production, but we said No. 
W; would not be committed to any future deal." 

No Longer a Virgin 

"We have some television production plans. A lot of 
cur properties would be adaptable to TV series. As re- 
gards the release to TV of our post-1948 backlog there is 
now no legal obstacle. The problems with the guilds have 
been pretty well resolved, but there is an obstacle in put- 
ting those pictures into TV release — there are still too 
many pre-1948 films yet to be sold." 

The picture which emerges from the foregoing facts is 
somewhat confusing, for it gives no very clear indication 
of what the future holds in store for RKO. 

It does seem, however, that the very nature of the busi- 
ness has been, or is being, utterly transformed. Mr. O'Neil 



THE TEEN-AGE CUSTOMER 

(Continued from Page 15) 

The effect of a lax policy toward adolescent theatre be- 
havior problems is not an overnight sensation. It really 
takes years for the moviegoing public to become conscious- 
ly perturbed; but we are now at the point where it is fair 
to say that there has been a perceptible downgrading of 
many motion picture theatres because of the teen-age prob- 
lem. 

In some theatres the downgrading has resulted from 
giving the teen-agers too little scrutiny and regulation, 
with resultant physical damage to the theatre. In other 
theatres, the downgrading has resulted from the opposite 
extreme of policy, with all teen-agers banned and an inter- 
ruption to the moviegoing habit of the new generation re- 
sulting. In some theatre, halfway measures have produced 
half-way results while major teen-age enthusiasm goes in- 
stead to television, dancing, etc. 

Apart from the content of particular pictures and the 
general nuisance created by a troublesome minority of 
adolescents, the big question bothering exhibitors in re- 
gard to teen-age patronage is whether cut rate tickets are 
worthwhile. On the whole, they seem to create a fair in- 
crease in volume; but they do not usually bring in enough 
new business to imply a rousing success, and many theatre 
managers report that the increased volume when the cut 



talks bravely about "new production", yet he has no dis- 
tribution machinery left, and no concrete plans for getting 
distribution on a more profitable basis than when the com- 
pany maintained its own exchanges. 

He is advertising RKO's willingness to finance inde- 
pendent production, in much the same way as United Ar- 
tists has been doing ; yet he cannot, without a distribution 
system, offer an independent complete facilities, and if the 
intention is to make picture-by-picture deals with other 
companies for handling RKO-financed, or RKO-made 
product, it is difficult to see what any independent pro- 
ducer with a worthwhile property would gain by doing 
business with RKO. 

He admits that some thought has been given to selling 
RKO's post-1948 backlog to TV, yet is well aware that, if 
he were to do this in the near future, he would be cutting 
the financial ground from under the feet of Matty Fox to 
whom he sold the pre-1948 backlog. 

In July, 1955, Tom O'Neil confessed with a smile, "I am 
a virgin in this field." He is a virgin no longer. Two and 
a-half years of hard work have mellowed and matured 
him. Now he knows, if he did not understand before, that 
the film industry is an attractive, but very demanding, 
mistress. 

However, don't count this man O'Neil out of motion pic- 
ture affairs. He has the drive and the brains to make a top-> 
flight showman, and the industry could use him. The only 
question is this: Has the fire to be a movieman burned out 
of him? If it has not, we predict that Tom O'Neil will one 
day rebuild his shattered dream of making RKO one of the f 
major components of the motion picture industry. 



rate plans first go into effect seems to level off with time. 

What it all seems to add up to is that the teen-age 
patron is a patron like anybody else; he goes to the movies 
to see the pictures he wants to see, not just to go to the 
movies; he does many other things with his leisure time, 
particularly in larger communities. Even in small towns, 
he is no longer "tied" to the single local theatre. Usually 
other communities have theatres within easy driving dis- 
tance for him. He is a conformist; he is apt to dress like 
his contemporaries, have the same tastes, go to the movies 
in a group with them. 

But he and his contemporaries can be any one of a dozen 
different categories of "typical" teen-agers, from the en- 
gineers of tomorrow to the deliquents, from the rock and 
roll bunch to the Boy Scouts, and/or a combination of 

same 

Notice that these are all comments on the problem ju- 
venile. The majority of teen-agers, being no problem, 
arouse little comment. And here is the nub of the situa- 
tion; for the decent teen-ager, like the decent adult, does 
not want to be in an audience of rowdies, or in an over- 
priced audience, or in a bored audience. And he doesn't 
always want juvenile pictures either. In the long run, the 
pictures that best succeed are those which please the ado- 
lescent and his parents too. Teen-agers are too general to 
be a lasting specialized audience. 



Page 13 Film BULLETIN February 4. 1957 




written by OWEN CRUMPano CHARLES L. TEDFORD -pftODucEo byCEDRIC FRANCIS ototed eyANDRE DELAVARRE 



i°°oA BIG WARNER BOOST FOR YOUR SHOW 
BIG WARNER PRIZES FOR YOUR SHOWMANSHIP! 



15 THEATRE MANAGERS^ WILL LIVE LIKE KINGS! 




TWO FREE WEEKS IN THE ROYAL SPLENDOR 

OF THE TOP HOTELS IN MIAMI!! i»W 




SAXON 




— J .Transport.,^ EX» « SUN "' 
included' Hurrv h a " d re,ur " 

- yieex c 't»ng details! 




"The Incredible Shrinking Man" 
Su4ut*M Ratut? O O O 

First-rate exploitation feature has action, thrilling effects. 
Sufficiently interesting to draw good grosses in general mar- 
ket. Word-of-mouth will help. 

One of the top exploitation features of the year. The in- 
triguing and weird story cf a man who shrinks down to 
one inch, this Universal offering is a natural for ballyhoo 
houses, but so expertly produced by Albert Zugsmith, its 
appeal figures to spill over into the general market. Word- 
of-mouth will boost grosses and counteract lack of mar- 
quee names. Grant Williams performs with befuddled fury 
the shrinking victim who befriends midgets, flees a hungry 
house cat, and combats a spider with a hair pin. Highly 
imaginative direction is supplied by Jack Arnold, and the 
special effects photography will intrigue youngsters and 
those who enjoy something different now and then. Wil- 
liams is caught in a "mysterious mist" out at sea that re- 
duces him physically by degree. Doctors seek an anti- 
toxin. He is given courage by beautiful midget April Kent, 
but continues to diminish. When the cat attacks his doll 
house quarters, he runs, falls into the basement. His wife, 
Randy Stuart, thinks the cat swallowed him and moves 
away. Williams fights and kills a spider while seeking 
food, and escapes the cellar through a wire mesh window 
grate. Continuing to shrink, he accepts his fate, realizing 
he's still one of God's creatures, regardless of size. 



Universal-International. 81 minutes. Grant Williams, Randy Stuart. April Kent, 
Paul Langton. Produced by Albert Zugsmi:h. Directed by Jack Arnold. 

"The Big Boodle" 

Familiar yarn about counterfeiters in Cuba has fair action. 
Erro! Flynn for marquee. OK dualler. 

This routine crime melodrama about a scramble for a 
fortune in counterfeit bills unfolds, with fair action, againsc 
a tropical background in Cuba. "The Big Boodle" will 
serve adequately as a dualler, particu'arly in action houses. 
Errol Flynn's name provides some marques value. The 
well-worn yarn is unfolded in black and white. Lewis F. 
Blumberg's production for United Artists release is reason- 
ably realistic, if sombre. Director Richard Wilson allows 
the action to slacken each time a character explains how 
he's involved with the "boodle" of three million pesos. 
Flynn, blackjack dealer at the casino, is mugged by 
Jacques Aubuchon's gang because he's carrying the iast 
bogus pesos in ciculation. He meets with Gia Scala, daugh- 
ter cf Cuban treasury minister Sandro Giglio, who wants 
to buy the counterfeit plates. Flynn recognizes Giglio's 
other daughter, Rossana Rory, as the blond who passed 
him the bad note. Flynn takes Miss Rory on the town 
hoping hoods will strike again. They are taken prisoner 
by Aubuchon who thinks Flynn has the plates. When 
Flynn is tortured, Miss Rory offers to take Aubuchon to 
the hiding place at Morro Castle. Policeman Pedro Armen- 
dariz pursues Flynn, who pursues Aubuchon, who falls 
over the castle wall into shark-infested waters. 



United Artists. 83 minutes. Errol Flynn, Pedro Armend^rii Rossana Rory Gia 
Scalo. Produced by Lewis F. Blumberg. Directed by Richard Wilson. 

P-go 23 film BULLETIN February 4, IS57 



The Halliday Brand" 

SututetA IQatfrtf Q Q Plus 

Tense western about family feud. Fair marquee values. Good 
dualler for general market. 

Joseph Cotton and Ward Bond battle it out as son 
against father in this highly melodramatic western re- 
leased through United Artists. Betsy Blair is the daughter 
Bond keeps from marrying a half-breed, and Viveca Lind- 
fors is an Indian squaw loved by younger son, Bill Wil- 
liams. Collier Young produced this story of a family's 
dissolution due to greedy vain, strong-willed old man. 
While "The Halliday Brand" is most suitable for action 
houses, it can serve as a good dualler in general situations. 
While some of the fury is hollow and it gets verbose, the 
script by George W. George and George S. Slavin is above 
par as western material. Director Joseph H. Lewis man- 
ages to keep things going at a fast clip. Cotton fights 
bitterly with Bond, aggressive sheriff who runs his chil- 
dren's lives. Miss Blair hates her father, who allowed her 
Indian sweetheart to be lynched. Outraged by Bond's in- 
humanity, Cotton leaves home, stops to console the dead 
Indian's family. He is attracted to the daughter, Viveca 
Lindfors. When Bond shoots her father, Jay C. Flippen, 
Cotton retaliates by destroying property and stampeding 
cattle. He eludes Bond's posse, but returns home later 
thinking Bond has changed. Bond draws a gun on him 
but is unable to fire. Bond dies as his children walk out 
on him. 



United Artists. 77 minutes. Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lindtors. Betsy Blair, Ward 
Bond. Produced by Colrier Young. Directed by Joseph H. Lewis. 

"The Big Land" 

'Sututeu 'Rod*? O O Plus 

Routine western bolstered by above par cast: Alan Ladd, 
Virginia Mayo, Edmond O'Brien. Best for action houses. 

Exhibitors who play westerns have a fair-plus entry in 
this Alan Ladd vehicle co-starring Virginia Mayo and Ed- 
mend O'Brien. A Jaguar (Ladd's company) Production 
released through Warner Bros., "The Big Land" has 
enough stcry substance and action to satisfy devotees o: 
outdoor melodramas. It offers little for class audiences. 
The WarnerColor cameras pick up some striking shots of 
the rugged terrain. Director Gordon Douglas favors action 
to characterization, so that the pace is fast enough but 
plausibility is lacking. The story takes place in the post- 
Civil War period. Cheated on the price of his herd, Ladd 
works out a plan with architect O'Brien (whose career was 
cut short by liquor) to have the railroad extend a 200-mile 
spur into Southern Kansas. Don Castle, engaged to 
O'Brien's sister, Miss Mayo, finances a town, including 
hotel to board Eastern cattle buyers. Gunman Anthony 
Caruso burns down the frames during construction, but 
ranchers rebuild. Caruso murders a cattle buyer and 
O'Brien in a duel. When Ladd returns from Texas with a 
herd, Caruso stampedes them. Ladd shoots him in a show- 
down. Miss Mayo reveals her love for Ladd. 



Warner Bros. IA Jaguar Production!. 93 minutes. Alan Ladd, Virqinia Mayo, 
Cdmond O'Brien. Asso. producer, George C. Bertholon. Director, Gordon Douglas. 



[More REVIEWS on Pace 22] 



WHAT'S HAPPENING 
AT RKO 



Why we make this statement 
at this time... 



There have been a lot of stories lately about what RKO 
is doing and what it intends to do. Here are the facts. 



Why certain changes are 
being made... 



The goal of RKO is to reduce its fixed domestic overhead 
by 531 for any given motion picture. 

Money saved by reducing these fixed costs in distribution 
and production can thus be applied to the creative end of 
picture making. 



What RKO is doing about 
motion picture distribution... 



RKO has made a limited agreement with Universal- 
International to distribute motion pictures through the 
Universal-International distribution system. This applies 
only to the United States and only to motion pictures 
started prior to December 31, 1956. 

Distribution by RKO of its pictures will continue in 
foreign markets in the same way as it has been. 

The agreement wiih Universal-International has been 
accomplished in order to eliminate duplication of 
distribution overhead and noncreative expenditures, 
allowing more resources to be put into the creative end 
of making better pictures. 



What changes will be made 
in RK(Js production... 



In production, there is also an opportunity to reduce the 
so-called below-the-line fixed charges attributed to a 
motion picture. These are noncreative costs and do not 
contribute to a picture's artistic or financial success. 

We have two groups of studio buildings— on Gower Street 
in Hollywood and in Culver City. How these production 
facilities can be put to best use has not yet been 
finally determined. 



How these changes will 
affect RKO's future. . . 



With the streamlining of its distribution and production, 
and the subsequent savings in fixed charges, RKO will 
be in a position to concentrate on the creative planning, 
making and promotion of better motion pictures. 



Our decisions on distribution and production are made 
with one goal in mind— to make better motion pictures more efficiently. 
This will benefit the public and motion picture exhibitors as zvell as ourselves. 



"The Wings of Eagles" 
GciAinete TZaUt? OOO Plus 

Exciting comedy-drama of navy daredevil with John Wayne 
as pioneer Naval flyer. Plenty of humor, good production 
values. Fine John Ford direction. Family entertainment, sure 
to gross well everywhere. 

This big, heartwarming, inspiring, rough-and-tumble 
drama records the colorful career of U.S. Navy flyer, Com- 
mander Frank W. "Spig" Wead. With John Wayne, Dan 
Dailey, and Maureen O'Hara to grace the marquee, with a 
host of exploitables, Charles Schnee's production in Metro- 
color is sure to meet with solid returns in the general mar- 
ket. It shapes up as M-G-M's best boxoffice film in some- 
time. The screenplay by Frank Fenton and William W. 
Haines, based on Wead's own writings, spans two World 
Wars chronicling the development of Naval aviation. 
Aerial scenes of bi-planes "crates" and carrier-fighters in 
the Pacific are livid with color and violent action. Director 
John Ford breathes life into every scene. His characters 
grow and change before your eyes. Wayne mellows rea- 
listically from a "rah-rah" Naval rascal to a World War 
II combat commander, suffering as a paraplegic for many 
years between wars. Dailey supplies much comic relief as 
cigar-puffing "chief" who saves Wayne's life in battle. Miss 
O'Hara is convincing as a Navy wife. Large cast of sup- 
porters includes Ward Bond, Ken Curtis and Edmund 
Lowe. Annapolis graduate Wayne helps the Navy drama- 
tize its need for aviation development by winning interna- 
tional seaplane races. His career gives him little for his 
wife, Miss O'Hara, and two daughters. Wayne becomes 
the youngest squadron commander in the service, returns 
home to patch things up, falls down stairs, and suffers a 
broken neck. Dailey, his old pal, nurses him into a wheel- 
chair, braces, and finally on canes. Wayne signs a Holly- 
wood contract with producer Bond to write authentic 
Naval screenplays. He gets rich and is set to return to 
Miss O'Hara when WWII breaks out and he requests duty 
in the Plans Division. The Navy likes his jeep-carrier idea 
and orders him to the Pacific to put it into action. Wayne 
collapses from fatigue after the battle at Kwajalein, and 
retires knowing his plan was successful. 



M-G-M. 110 minut 
Produced by Charle 



"Top Secret Affair" 
'ButiHCM Rati*? OOO 

Marquee magnets Kirk Douglas and Susan Hayward in amus- 
ing comedy-romance. Snappy script, bright direction, hand- 
some production will account for above-average grosses, 
generally. 

Kirk Douglas, a strictly-by-the-book Army general, and 
Susan Hayward, hard-driving news magazine publisher, 
fondle and foil each other in their first try at comedy. "Top 
Secret Affair", from Warner Bros., comes off as a lively 
spoof in which the sophisticated publisher attempts to de- 
bunk the clean-living, righteous field commander. Literate 
dialogue and romantic horseplay (including a hilarious 
jujitsu session between them) are combined by director 



H. C. Potter in a manner that will amuse most adult audi- 
ences. An excellent script by Roland Kibbee and Allan 
Scott is based on characters from John P. Marquand's best- 
seller, "Melville Goodwin, U.S.A.". Martin Raskin's top- 
drawer production provides chic costumes for Miss Hay- 
ward and authentic sets. Jim Backus provides good comic 
support and Paul Stewart is well cast as Miss Hayward's 
editor-in-chief. Publisher Hayward plans to smear Doug- 
las (nicknamed General "Ironpants") because he was 
given a job with the Atomic Commission that Miss Hay- 
ward wanted someone else to have. Douglas and assistant 
Backus spend a weekend at her estate for interviews. Find- 
ing Douglas completely sincere, she attempts to disgrace 
him at nightclubs and jazz-joints where a hidden camera- 
man records his antics. Douglas reveals his love shortly 
befcre the phony story appears. The Army is put in a bad, 
light, and Douglas is ordered before a Senate committee 
concerning an oriental girl he reportedly kept at his head- 
quarters in Korea. Miss Hayward testifies, apologizes, and 
Douglas is cleared via a top secret document that reveals 
he was baiting a female spy. Miss Hayward and Douglas 
are united in love. 

Warner Bros. 100 minutes. 
Backus. Produced by Martin R 

"The Happy Road" 
Scui«c44, 'Rati*? OOO 

Fine combination of heart-warming and farcical comedy 
made and played by Gene Kelly. Will amuse family and 
sophisticate trades. Word-of-mouth will boost grosses. 

If the word-of-mouth response catches up with this film 
before it runs its course, "The Happy Road" might be one 
of the surprise hits of the season. Personable Gene Kelly 
proves himself as skillful a producer-director as he is actor 
in this charming farce-comedy made in France. Released 
through M-G-M, it sparks with inherent humor as French 
and American personalities clash during a fast-moving 
search for a pair of runaway youngsters. The treatment is 
tasteful, colorful (in black and white), with elements of 
humor concocted to charm audiences of all ages. Cast is 
French execpt for Kelly, his vagrant son, Bobby Clark, and 
Michael Redgrave, who offers a completely disarming 
caricature of a stiff-upper-lip British general. Pretty Bar- 
bara Laage plays the worried widow mother of Brigitte 
Fossey, who joins young Clark in running away from their 
fashionable Swiss school. As director, Kelly moves things : 
along with spontaneity and bounce over the rustic French 
countryside. Fun begins with a sound track title tune by 
Maurice Chevalier. Kelly, American businessman in Paris, 
learns his son, Bobby Clark, has run away from school to 
prove his self-reliance. Brigitte joins him, and her mother, 
Miss Laage, joins Kelly in tracking down the kids. They 
search through small towns, a carnival, and over a British 
army maneuver area commanded by Redgrave. The kids 
hop a ride on a radio truck escorting a cross-country bi- 
cycle race into Paris, and arrive home before their parents. 
Kelly discovers he likes Miss Laage, and the relaxed, 
French way of life. 



M-G-M. 100 minutes. Gene Kelly, Barbara Laage, Michael Redgrave 
and directed by Gene Kelly. 



Produced 



TOPS 



OOO GOOD O O AVERAGE 



O POOR 



Page 22 Film BULLETIN February 4 1957 



"Men in War" 

Sci4iKe44 RatutQ O O Plus 

'rospects OK for taut closeup of Korean war. All-male cast 
}lus treatment restrict appeal to action houses. 

This is an interesting and off-beat treatment of infantry 
:ombat in Korea designed exclusively for action markets. 
With microscopic detail, "Men in War" follows the strug- 
gle and anxiety of an American platoon trapped behind 
enemy lines. Because there are no sub-plot flash-backs to 
girls or families back home, Sidney Harmon's production 
for United Artists release is restricted in appeal to action 
fans and ex-servicemen who appreciate warfare authen- 
tically depicted for a change. Thanks to Anthony Mann's 
intimate direction, it can be considered superior in its cate- 
gor)'. Performances of the all-male cast are good with 
Robert Ryan as the dogmatic, duty-bound lieutenant, and 
Aldo Ray as the NCO devoted to Robert Keith, a shell- 
shocked colonel who calls him "son". Keith's role is unique 
in that he speaks not a single word. Based on the novel 
Combat" by Van Van Pragg, the screenplay was penned 
by Philip Yordan. Elmer Bernstein's background score is 
a blend of occidental-oriental tones and rhythms. Ryan's 
platoon, cut off behind enemy lines, treks toward safety 
through rough country, snipers and landmines. Ray turns 
up in a jeep with Keith, whom he's taking to a hospital. 
Ryan decides 24 men are worth more than one shell- 
shocked colonel, and takes the jeep as an ammunition car- 
rier. Expert infantryman Ray gains Ryan's respect and 
they wipe out an enemy hill with a flame thrower during a 
battle in which the entire platoon is killed. Sole survivors 
Ryan, Ray and Keith walk over the hill to freedom. 



ity Pictures Production) . 
ed by Sidney Harmon. 



minutes. Robert Ryan 
:ted by Anthony Mar 



"Five Steps to Danger" 

Spy meller designed for action fans. Ruth Roman, Sterling 
Hayden add marquee appeal. OK dualler. 

Performances are superior to story material in this inter- 
national spy melodrama based on a SatEvePost serial. 
Henry S. Kesler's production for United Artists release is 
adequate for action fans and should serve as a fair dualler 
n the general market. Kesler, who also directed and wrote 
the screenplay, is a bit slow in getting the events under 
way in Ruth Roman's desperate attempt to beat Russian 
spies to a U.S. missile center with a ballistics formula she 
brought from Europe. Both she and Sterling Hayden, a 
hitch-hiker who becomes involved, endow the hectic pro- 
ceedings with some plausibility. Hayden offers to share 
the driving with Miss Roman, who is rushing to Santa Fe 
with a secret missile formula she's delivering from East 
Germany. Her psychiatrist, Werner Klemperer, an enemy 
agent, is attempting to have her committed. Stopped by 
police, they learn Miss Roman is accused of murder in Los 
Angeles. They escape, realize they're in love, and marry. 
Government agent Charles Davis permits them to carry 
through the mission to bait spies hidden in the missile 
center. In desperation, spy leader Richard Gaines guns 
for Miss Roman, but is shot dead by police. 



ed and directed by 



"Hut Summer Night" 

Crime melodrama set in Southern town has suspense, mood. 
Lacks marquee names. Fair dual-biller for action spots. 

This crime melodrama from M-G-M has enough action, 
suspense, and mood to satisfy in spots where audiences 
aren't too discriminating. Vigorous exploitation may over- 
come the absence of "names" in the cast. Both theme and 
treatment in Morton Fine's Modest production have ele- 
ments ranging from highly original to extremely contrived. 
Screenplay by Fine and director David Friedkin is set 
against a decaying Southern town. Leslie Nielsen, Colleen 
Miller, Edward Andrews and Jay C. Flippen all turn in 
competent performances. The action is well handled, but 
Friedkin doesn't quite achieve the mood of the townfolk 
whose claim to fame is a public-enemy born and hiding in 
the nearby hills. Honeymooning with his wife, Miss Mil- 
ler, unemployed reporter Nielsen decides he can regain his 
job by getting an interview with bank robber Robert 
Wilke hiding in the hills. He gets the story, but Wiike 
holds him for ransom from the newspaper for which Niel- 
sen worked. Gunman Paul Richards shoots Wilke and 
teams with another gang member, Flippen to finish the 
deal. Miss Miller rides a newspaper delivery truck, locates 
the hideout when Richards picks up his paper. Police close 
in and exterminate the gang. 

M-G-M. 86 minutes. Leslie Nielsen, Colleen Miller, Edward Andrews. Produced 



"Kelly and Me" 

SuUkcu, 'Rating O Q 

Backstage story of vaudevillian and his dog is light, enter- 
taining. Has fair marquee, CinemaScope and Technicolor. 
Figures best as dualler for family trade. 

With Van Johnson playing a slick song-and-dance 
vaudevillian who uses a dog as a springboard to success in 
Hollywood, this Universal-International offering has some 
good human interest elements. Robert Arthur's production 
in CinemaScope and Technicolor rather overdresses a 
simple story, which figures to hold most appeal for family 
audiences. Youngsters will love it. Piper Laurie and Mar- 
tha Hyer add mild marquee support. Real star of the film, 
however, is the smart white shepherd dog, Kelly. Robert 
Z. Leonard directed with proper emphasis on the human 
values. The pace is placid until the final footage when 
Kelly's sadistic owner turns up to claim him and stirs up 
some excitement. Johnson is a vaudeville flop until, by 
accident, Kelly gets into his act. Miss Laurie talks her 
father, Hollywood producer Onslow Stevens, into making 
"barkies" (dog pictures) starring Kelly. Johnson, hired 
for bit parts, hogs the footage, then attempts to produce 
his own films with money Kelly earns. Kelly's original 
owner, Gregory Gay, turns up to claim the dog, and John- 
son goes back to his old stage routine. Kelly refuses to act 
without Johnson, then runs away to find him. They are 
finally reunited, and Johnson returns to make pictures with 
Stevens and to marry Miss Laurie. 

rtha Hyer. 



Universal-International. 84 
Produced by Robert Arthur. 



Van Johnson, Piper Laur 
by Robert Z. Leonard. 



Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 23 



THEY 

MADE THE NEWS 



ALBERT SINDLINGER, research ana- 
lyst, told delegates at the opening session 
cf National Allied's fourth annual drive- 
in convention in Cincinnati last Tuesday 
that exhibitors are "over the hump" if 
they will "use facts to feel with — for it 
will be the proper use of facts — coupled 
with showmanship — which will be the de- 
termining factor in separating the boys 
from th; men this year". Studies by his 
organization, Sindlinger said, reveal that 
"watching the new-old features on tele- 
vision is whetting the public's appetite to 
see the newer pictures playing at thea- 
tres". Abram F. Myers, Allied general 
counsel, was scheduled to bring before 
the Allied board, meeting immediately 
after the convention, these issues: steps 
taken so far by Allied to effectuate an 
arbitration plan; the possible return of 
Allied to COMPO; the "apparent indif- 
ference of certain of the film companies" 
to the recommendations of the Senate 
Small Business Committee. The board 
was also to elect new officers, including a 
successor to president Ruben Shor. Myers 
was to report to the convention on the 
possibilities of a top-level exhibitor-dis- 
tributor conference. 



1 1 1 

• 1 




BROTHERHOOD AWARDS 

Top: Jack L. Warner receives Brotherhood 
Award for 1957 from Dr. Everett R. Clinchy. 
president of the National Conference of 
Christians and Jews at Jan. 24 banquet in New 
York, as national co-chairman ff illiam J. 
Heineman looks on. Center, toastmaster Louis 
Nizer presents Artists Award to singer Harry 
Belajonte. Bottom. RKO Theatres president 
Sol A. Schwartz, and 20th-Fox vice president 
Charles Einfeld. Brotherhood tt eek campaign 
runs February 17-24. 



THOMAS F. O'NEIL denied that RKO 
Radio Pictures will be dissolved as a pic- 
ture making company, although its sales 
and distribution arms were taken over 
last week by Universal Pictures. O'Neil 
said that between 8 and 10 features will 
be produced this year. However, they 
are not part of the Universal deal. Final 
verification of the RKO-U transaction 
was made Jan. 23 by Universal Pictures 
president Milton R. Rackmil and RKO 
president Daniel T. O'Shea. (Other de- 
tails in feature story on O'Neil this issue.) 

0 

JOSEPH R. VOGEL, in his first annual 
report to the stockholders, disclosed that 
Loew's has established a new department, 
MGM-TV, to produce films for television. 
Charles C. (Bud) Barry, in charge of 
Metro's television activities, will head the 
unit. Facilities of the company's West 
coast studios will be utilized, and pilot 
films of several old M-G-M movie hits 
are already in work, Vogel stated. Loew's 
report showed consolidated net profit of 
$4,837,729 for the fiscal year ended Aug- 
ust 31, 1956, equivalent to 91 cents per 
share. This compares with $5,311,733, or 
$1.03 per share, for the preceding year. 
Despite the drop of $474,004 in profits, 
operating revenues increased in 1956 to 
$172,355,933 compared with $170,952,059. 
O 

LOUIS FORMATO 
was named by gen- 
eral sales manager 
Charles M. Reagan 
to succeed Rudolph 
Berger as M-G-M's 
southern division 
sales head. Formato 
has recently served 
as Phila. district 
mgr. With MGM 
since 1924, Berger will retire in late Feb. 
O 

MILTON R. RACKMIL, Universal Pic- 
tures president, reported to stockholders 
that consolidated net earnings for 53 
weeks ended Nov. 3, 1956, was $3,993, 146 
($4.06 per share), compared to $4,018,625 
($3.71 per share) for 52 weeks in the pre- 
ceding fiscal year. Film rentals and sales 
showed a slight increase. 

0 

ROY HAINES, Warner 
Bros, sales head, promised ex- 
hibitors "a long period of im- 
portant top quality produc- 
tions" backed up by top level 
campaigns, but urged the the- 
atremen to "merchandise fully 
each picture" in their own sit- 
uations. Speaking at the re- 
cent home office sales con- 
clave, Haines listed "A Face 
In The Crowd" and "The 
Prince and The Showgirl" as 
among the "new look" pic 
tures coming from WB. 
President Jack L. Warner, 
executive v.p. Benjamin Kal- 
menson and advertising v.p. 
Robert W. Taplinger also ad- 
dressed the group. 




A light i 
as addre 
cago. At 
Mid We 
tral disi 



lament as President Spxros P. Skour- 
ises 20th-Fox sales gathering in Chi- 
left sales chief Alex Harrison: right, 
t district manager M. A. Levy. Cen- 
rid manager Tom O. McCleaster. 



SPYROS P. SKOURAS, describing 1957 
as the "year of destiny", outlined a sched- 
ule of more than 50 pictures to come from 
20th Century-Fox this year and predicted 
that the company would do an annual 
gross business approaching $150,000,000 
in the "not far distant future". The in- 
domitable 20th executive made his re- 
marks on his return from th; recent sales 
meeting convened in Chicago by distribu- 
tion head Alex Harrison. Skouras said 
that Fox's "doors are open and we wel- 
come . . . top-flight craftsmen and inde- 
pendent producers who have good ideas 
and can make quality boxoffice films". He 
also threw his support behind the drive, 
announced by Harrison, whereby Fox 
will aid theatres in small towns and sub- 
sequent-run situations, while searching 
for ways of re-opening theatres that have 
closed. Harrison had said that Fox will 
make the strongest efforts to assist ex- 
hibitors in stimulating theatre attendance 
by devising special campaigns to inform 
the public that the best entertainment 
available is in theatres. Salesmen were in- 
structed to meet with theatremen to see 
how the company could assist them re- 
vivifying closed or failing houses. 




W arner Brothi 
at the recent sales confe 
clockwise : district manag 



s manager Roy Haines presides 
-e in the home office. Seated. 
W illiam Mansell. Ernest Sands. 
Ed. It illiamson : v.p. Bernard R. Goodman. Haines, division 
sales mgrs. Jules Lapidus, W. O. K illiamson. Jr.: Norman 
J. Ayers of playdate dept.. Canadian dist. mgr. Haskell 
Masters. Howard Levinson of legal dept. Standing from I.: 
district managers Graver Livingston. Ralph J. lannuzzi. 
Robert Smeltzer, Fred Greenberg. Hall U alsh, A. W. Ander- 
son. Seated, r., short subjects sales mgr. Norman H Moray. 



Page 24 Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 



HEADLINERS... 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




ROSS 

FRANK ROSS, producer of "The Robe", 
j told the New York trade press that he 
and Frank Sinatra will jointly produce 
"Kings Go Forth" for United Artists re- 
lease. Film will be from the Joe David 
Brown novel about two American para- 
troopers in France who fall in love with a 
negro girl. Sinatra will star, UA will 
finance the film in black and white. Ross 
Admitted he might experience some diffi- 
culty in selling the picture because of its 
'racial theme. 

0 

BARNEY BALABAN announced that 
Paramount News, which served as the 
famed "eyes and ears of the world" for 
more than 30 years, will be discontinued 
[Feb. 15. The "changing situation in our 
(industry", plus the company's policy of 
investing in fields which "offer the best 
opportunities and maximum security for 
la vital and profitable future for our com- 
pany", were the reasons given by the 
Paramount president for the move. In 
[recent years. Paramount has diversified 
[into television research and production, 
bs well as the recording business. To put 
it simply, Paramount News was another 
| :asualty of TV's intrusion upon the news 
I 1 reporting field. In August, 1956, Warner 
Brothers ceased operations of its Warner- 
Pathe newsreel. With Paramount's with- 
drawal, Fox Movietone, Universal News 
hnd MGM's News of the Day are the 
j only three theatre reels left in operation. 




ER WIN LESSER was named to head 
NTA Pictures, Inc., a motion picture re- 
leasing company being formed by Na- 
tional Telefilm Associates, distributor of 
films to TV. Announcement of the new 
venture was made by Oliver A. Unger, 
NTA executive vice president, who de- 
clared that NTA Pictures will adhere to a 
"firm policy of guaranteeing extended 
clearance for theatrically released features 
prior to making them available" to TV. 
A minimum of 12 pictures are contem- 
plated for release in 1957. Lesser, once an 
exhibitor, was formerly associated with 
Paramount and several independents. 

0 

IRVING H. LEVIN, president of Am- 
Par Pictures Corp., a subsidiary of Ameri- 
can Broadcasting-Paramount Theatres, 
Inc., announced the company will invest 
$3 million in the production of six pic- 
tures within the next six months. Estab- 
lished last November by AB-PT to make 
moderately-priced films and in general to 
help fill the industry's need for more 
product, Am-Par recently completed its 
first film, "Beginning of the End". 

o 

WALTER READE, WILBUR SNAP- 
ER & IRVING DOLLINGER, repre- 
senting three independent theatre organi- 
zations in the New York area, have 
formed Triangle Theatre Service, a joint 
booking and buying unit aimed at 
"streamlining" operations for the com- 
panies involved. The group will begin 
operations March 1 with headquarters in 
New York. It will be headed by Dollin- 
ger, vice president of Independent Thea- 
tre Service, Snaper, general manager of 
the Snaper Circuit, and Jack P. Harris, 
vice president in charge of film buying 
for the Walter Reade Theatres. Principal 
aims of the new combine will be to effect 
economies in home office overhead, afford 
greater cooperation between the theatres 
involved, and combine advertising and 
promotion "to achieve the maximum 
grosses with minimum expenses". 

O 

SAM KAISER, former creative advertis- 
ing director for Warner Brothers at 
Blaine Thompson Co., announced the for- 
mation of Kaiser, Sedlow and Temple, 
Inc., an "independent creative service for 
motion picture advertising". The com- 
pany will provide motion picture com- 
panies, independent producers and adver- 
tising agencies with everything from total 
campaign concepts to copy and layout. 
Victor Sedlow had served as art director 
of 20th-Fox, while Herman Temple was 
an industry art director consultant. 



Group pictured were among promi- 
nent industryites gathered on the 
eoast recently to par tribute to re- 
tiring Loew's Pacific Coast sales 
manager George A. Hickey and to 
welcome his successor. Herman L. 
Ripps. Seated, from left: Ripps, 
Loew's sales head Charles M. 
Reagan. Hickey. Los Angeles 
branch mgr. Thomas J. Aspell. 
Standing, from I.: MGM t.p. E. J. 
Mannix, National Theatres presi- 
dent Elmer C. Rhoden. I A Thea- 
tres exec. v.p. E. H. Rowley. Mar- 
co Wolf, producer Robt. I.ippert. 



MPA president ERIC JOHNSTON and 
the board of directors accepted the resig- 
nation of NICHOLAS M. SCHENCK. 
Loew's president JOSEPH R. VOGEL 
and general counsel BENJAMIN MEL- 
NIKER elected to replace Schenck. 
Vogel was also appointed to the execu- 
tive committee of the board. ABE 
SCHNEIDER, Columbia Pictures trea- 
surer and MPA board member, named to 
the MPA executive committee, succeed- 
ing the late JACK COHN. Columbia 
v.p. ABE MONTAGUE also elected to 
the MPA board. The board accepted the 
resignation of WILLIAM H. CLARK 
who represented RKO Radio Pictures... 
20th-Fox president SPYROS P. SKOUR- 
AS headed a delegation of home office 
executives to Chicago for the fourth in a 
series of five divisional sales meetings 
being convened by general sales topper 
ALEX HARRISON. Also at the mid- 
West conclave: secretary-treasurer DON- 
ALD A. HENDERSON, Central-Ca- 

Plans for NY. City's 1957 Brotherhood cdmpalqr 
got recent once over by, from I., Joseph Sugar, 



nadian division manager C. GLENN 
NORRIS ... ALFRED E. DAFF, Uni- 
versal executive v.p., back on the coast 
following conferences with home office 
personnel . . . CHARLES LEVY, who re- 
sumed as Buena Vista advertising and 
publicity director Feb. 1, is back at the 
home offices after product and policy 
meetings at the Walt Disney studio on 
the coast... U-I sales head CHARLES 
J. FELDMAN and v.p. DAVID A. LIP- 
TON among executives present in N.Y. 
recently at the first of company's three 
sales meetings called to acquaint person- 
nel with handling of RKO pictures . . . Di- 
rector FRED ZINNEMANN announced 
formation of F.R.Z. Company, his own, 
for production of motion pictures. War- 
ners will distribute... YUL BRYNNER 
& director ANATOLE LITVAK also to 
form production company . . . U-I presi- 




Jack L. Warner. I., & WB exec. v.p. Beni. Kalmen- 
son. r., visit John Raitt, Doris Day & producer 
George Abbott on set of WB's "The Pajama Game". 

dent MILTON R. RACKMIL conferring 
with Latin American staffers in Buenos 
Aires and Rio de Janeiro . . . 20th-Fox 
trade paper contact HAROLD RAND 
named metropolitan newspaper contact. 
EDWARD S. FELDMAN takes over 
Rand's former spot . . . Paramount Min- 
neapolis branch mgr. JESS McBRIDE 
and his staff winners in first phase of 
Para.'s "Salute to George Weltner" sales 
drive ... Allied Artists concluded deal 
with independent producers ALBERT 
GANNAWAY and NORMAN HER- 
MAN for distribution of five films . . . Al- 
lied of Illionis president JACK KIRSCH 
for 8th consecutive year named chairman 
of the Theatre and Amusement division 
fund drive of the Chicago Council, Boy 
Scouts of America . . . Texas Drive-In 
Theatre Owners to hold statewide con- 
vention Feb. 26 & 27 in Dallas. Associa- 
tion president EDDIE JOSEPH to pre- 
side... DIED: FRANCIS P. DERVIN, 
ass't to RKO v.p. Edward L. Walton. 



Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 25 






Coming attraction trailers carry a 
lot of weight with theatre audi- 
ences. Every independent statisti- 
cal survey" proves that trailers 
are primarily responsible for the 
attendance of every third movie 
patron. So, don't be penny-wise 
and pound foolish. Let the Prize 
Baby take a load off your mind 
and give your grosses a lift at 
minimum cost with trailers. 



•'•WOMAN'S HOME COMPANION 

Survey showed 31 per cent went to the movies because of TRAILERS! 

SINDLINGER 

CX,il^m. Survey showed 34.2 per cent went to the movies because of TRAILERS! 

mmmi\CV£€/l service 

w P/f/Zf 80 BY Of nif /nous TRY 

NATIONAL THEATRES CIRCUIT IN 21 STATES 

Survey showed 43 per cent went to the movies because of TRAILERS! 



"TtaUet* — Showmen '5 Socko Salesmen / 



MERCHANDISING & 



1 



Einteld Sets 20th Promotion for 
6 Months; Emphasis on Teenagers 




EINTELD 



Having set the 
distribution pace 
quantitatively 
with the biggest 
distribution pro- 
gram it has of- 
fered in a decade, 
20th Century-Fox 
has matched it 
with promotional 
plans for a full 
six-month sched- 
ule. The lucrative 
teenage market 
will be given spe- 
cial emphasis in 
the various cam- 



paigns, according to vice-president Charles 
Einfeld, in an effort to reach the largest 
audience possible for each picture. 

Some 26 films will be encompassed in the 
hard-hitting series of selling drives during 
the first half of 1957. A feature of the long- 
range planning is the opportunity 20th has 
set up to stimulate maximum interest in each 
film at least two months prior to the first 
bookings. 

One of the campaigns slated to grab plenty 
Df attention from exhibitors and theatregoers 
alike is blueprinted for 20th's Easter offering, 



"Boy on a Dolphin". Featuring an eleven 
city simultaneous world debut for the benefit 
of American colleges in Greece, the openings 
will be backed by civic and cultural notables 
in each premiere engagement. In a different 
slant on the same film, the company will 
launch a king-size bally drive to further ex- 
ploit Italian movie queen Sophia Loren to 
the American public. 

Typical of "the forward look" plans in 
merchandising its product is 20th's campaign 
for the June release, "Three Faces of Eve". 
Coincidental with the February start of pro- 
duction on the psychological drama, Mc- 
Graw-Hill, publishers of the book on which 
the movie is based, will join hands with 20th 
in an impressive "read the book — see the 
movie" campaign. Additional selling angles 
to be utilized include a massive ballyhoo to 
introduce Joanne Woodward in her first 
starring role, and a cover-the-country in- 
person tour by producer-director Nunnally 
Johnson. 

For "Oh Men!, Oh Women!", fern stars 
Ginger Rogers and Barbara Rush will hit 
the trail with an intensive key-city trek to 
sell the Washington Birthday attraction. An- 
other highlight of the CinemaScope comedy 
campaign will be a 150-city sneak preview 
on February 9. 



SWEEPSTAKES FACTS 



* The Academy Awards Sweepstakes are of- 
fered by COMPO to the theatres of America as 
z local promotion designed to increase attend- 
ance. 

* The project has been approved by the 
COMPO Executive Committee, on which are 
epresented all the exhibitor organization mem- 
>ers of COMPO. 

* The Sweepstakes will take the form of a 
juessing contest, in which the public will have 
in opportunity to try to name the winners of 12 
>f the 27 categories for which Academy Awards 
"ill be announced in Hollywood on March 27. 

* Prizes will be offered to those who come 
tearest to guessing the winners in the twelve 
■ategories designated. In addition to naming 
he winner each contestant must write a 25- 
vord sentence, which will serve to break pos- 
sible ties. 

* Prizes are to be promoted by participating 
heatres. Theatres may act alone or join with 
>ther theatres in conducting the Sweepstakes 
md promoting prizes. 

* There will be national prizes. 



* Nominations for the Academy Awards will 
be announced in Hollywood on February 19. 
Upon the announcement of the nominations entry 
blanks will be printed and distributed to theatres 
as quickly as possible by National Screen Ser- 
vice. 

* A complete line-up of accessories will be 
available. These include advertising mats, trail- 
er, one-sheets, lobby posters, marquee valance, 
snipes, etc. 

* A press book covering all phases of the 
Sweepstakes — promotion, rules, stories for news- 
paper planting, how to promote prizes, choose 
board of judges, accessories available and sug- 
gested prizes, is to be sent to theatres gratis by 
National Screen. This should be in the hands of 
exhibitors on or about February 1. 

* Participating theatres should have little 
trouble in obtaining the cooperation of their 
local newspapers. The nature and extent of this 
cooperation may be whatever is decided on be- 
tween the theatres and the newspapers. 

* Sweepstakes similar to this have already 
been conducted by theatres in Texas and other 
Southern States and also in Canada. 

[More SHOWMEN on Page 28 J 



Exhibition Awaits Final Report 
On Business-Building Confab 

With the wind-up of the meetings of the 
joint Business-Building conference last week, 
exhibitors eagerly awaiting the report detail- 
ing the united promotional program finally 
agreed upon by representatives of COMPO. 
TOA and the Motion Picture Association, 
will have to mark time for a while. 

Harry Mandel, who presided at the con- 
cluding session, directed Charles E. Mc- 
Carthy, COMPO information director, and 
Taylor Mills of MPAA to collaborate on the 
report and have it ready as soon as possible. 

However, because the results of an indus- 
try-wide survey to be made by a marketing 
research organization are expected to be in- 
cluded in the final presentation, Mills said 
that the report could be held up for as much 
as 90 days. This means that the important 
document may not be ready until May. 

The tabling of plans for a joint-distribution 
institutional advertising campaign, pending 
completion of the research study, brought a 
warning by Ernest Stellings, TOA president, 
who urged no unnecessary delay in launch- 
ing the all-industry drive to hypo theatre at- 
tendance. As soon as the group's business- 
building plans were crystallized, Stellings de- 
clared, he would undertake a fund-raising 
drive to help finance the program. The ex- 
hibition leader also expressed satisfaction 
with the recently announced plans for the 
Aacademy Award Sweepstakes. 




Roger Lewis (right), United Artists" national di- 
rector of advertising, publicity and exploitation, 
confers on 1957 exploitation plan in Atlanta, 
Ga. with (I. to r. ) exhibitor Hop Barnes, UA 
salesman Bob Tarwater, and Bill Hames, Atlanta 
branch manager. 



Potent Publicity Barrage Greets 
Bergman On Brief U.S. Visit 

Ingrid Bergman's 34-hour visit to these 
shores to accept the New York Film Critics' 
Best Actress Award for her sparkling per- 
formance in "Anastasia" tumbled a barrelful 
of high-powered publicity into the lap of 
20th Century-Foy, distributors of the picture. 

Returning to the United States after an 
absence of over seven years, the popular 
Swedish-born actress was greeted at Idle- 
wild airport by 20th vice president Charles 
Einfeld, scores of faithful fans and admirers, 
and a thundering herd of reporters, photog- 
raphers and newsreel cameramen represent- 
ing every newspaper and radio-television out- 
let in the metropolitan area and all the wire 
services and networks. 

Miss Bergman was hosted at a party given 
by the Critics where she was formally pre- 
sented with the coveted award. During the 
festivities the actress was interviewed by 
TV's Steve Allen, who later presented the 
filmed chat cn his Sunday nite program. 

20th executives at the Awards Dinner: 
president Spyros P. Skouras; Buddy Adler, 
the company's executive producer and "Ana- 
stasia" producer; Charles Einfeld and direc- 
tor of the picture, Anatole Litvak. 

February's 3 Big Holidays 
Make Month Long On Show'ship 

February may be a short month when it 
comes to counting the number of days, but it 
packs a powerful promotional punch when it 
comes to adding up exploitation possibilities. 
Top selling angles in the 28-day month re- 
volve around Valentine's Day and the birth- 
days of Washington and Lincoln. 

With a little extra effort, February 14 can 
be one of the big grossers on the month's 
calendar. Because "love makes the world go 
'round", a Valentine's Midnight Show for 
Lovers can make the boxoffke jump. Only 
couples are admitted to an attraction of this 
type, and the film should be one that empha- 
sizes love, lovers and romance. 

Another business-builder with an eye to 
the women's market involves the presenta- 
tion of a free flower, via a co-op with a 
florist, to the first 100 ladies attending a 
Valentine's Day Show. In an attempt to 
cash the lucrative gift market, a hard-hitting 
promotion to sell "Valentine Movie Books", 
containing gift coupons can add greatly to 
the profit ledger. 

By providing a show keyed to the kid 
crowd during the birth dates of the two 
presidents, when most schools are closed, a 
showmanship-wise manager can give tired 
mothers a rest and help the kids celebrate 
at a cartoon carnival or a specially tailored 
action show. 

February is also Minnie Mouse's birthday 
and a rousing cartoon carnival would be a 
terrific celebration for MM and you. 




-A Hi-lights of Ingrid Bergman's brief but tri- 
umphant return to the States after a seven-and- 
a-half year absence. Top to bottom: 1 ) Faithful 
fans greet Miss Bergman at N. Y.'s Idelwild Air- 
port as she returns to accept award from New 
York Film Critics for her performance in 20th- 
Fox' "Anastasia". 2) Talking things over with 
Spyros Skouras and Mr. and Mrs. Murray Silver- 
stone. 3) Miss Bergman and Charles Einfeld, 
20th vice president. 4) Irene Thirer, chairman 
of the N. Y. Film Critics presents award to the 
Swedish-born star as the best actress for 1956. 



Hard-working Disney Trio Sells | 
New England Kids on 'Cinderella' 

Three top Disney personalities — Jimmid 
Dodd and Roy Williams, stars of the Mickeji 
Mouse Club TV Show, and Volus Jones, ond . 
of Disney's top animators — have launched z 
4-week tour of 100 New England cities tc 
help sell the kid audience on the return 
playoff of "Cinderella". 

Long a Disney tradition, the New England 
tours were started in 1952 and have grown 
successfully with each succeeding year. Lasf 
year the traveling Disneyites covered almosi i 
80 situations; this year, Dodd, Williams and 
Jones will hit the 100 mark to drumbeat the 
200 day and date bookings already set for 
the Disney classic. 

Each star will appear before 10,000 
15,000 children and adults per day in th 
tight 10-hour-a-day, 6-day-a-week schedul 
Appearances will be made in schools, ho 
pitals, orphanages, civic clubs and at W. T 
Grant stores. Par on the promotional sched 
ule for each performer is 10 school perform 
ances, 2 radio interviews, a TV appearance 
a Grant Store show, a hospital appearance 
and a Rotary dinner — all in one day's work. 

Metro's 'Little Hut' Island 
Giveaway Gets March Kickoff 

Metro's Ava-Ava Island giveaway is being 
geared for a March 1 launching with five 
million folder entry blanks, 2000 one-sheets 
in color, special stills and trailer tags as part 
of the campaign on behalf of "The Little 
Hut" (Ava Gardner-Stewart Granger). 

The uniaue promotion is being co-spon- 
sored by M-G-M, the Pacific Area Travel 
Association and Samsonite Luggage, features 
a limerick contest in which contestants will 
offer the final line and the winner awarded 
an actual island in the Crown Colony of Fiji. 

Samsonite, latest of the co-sponsors, will 
handle the servicing of the entries at its 
Travel Bureau in Denver, Colorado, and will 
also furnish a complete set of luggage similar 
to that used by Miss Gardner in the film. 
Entry blanks will be available at local thea- 
tres, travel agencies and Samsonite dealers. 

Theatres wishing to participate in the con- 
test are asked to contact Metro's home office 
promotion department at 1540 Broadway. 

New Whipping Boy? 

In a rapid about face on the merits of 
movie advertising, and in a manner that 
would make Russian policy changes seem 
amateurish, Advertising Age rose to the de- 
fense of motion picture advertising with a 
recent commentary by Walter O'Meara in 
a column called "Just Looking". Says Mr. 
O'Meara: "Somehow I can't get too exer- 
cised about all the pious wails over motion 
picture advertising. In the first place, it 
isn't all as bad as the horrible examples. In 
the second place, what do you expect?" He 
then proceeds into a full scale give-'em-hell 
tirade against "the lower level of form, taste 
and morals that occasionally crops up in the 
advertising of books." 



Page 28 Film BULLETIN February 4 ,1957 




Hj&at t&e S&acwiM /tie *Dowy! 



-A- To the Showmen go the prizes. Top: Stanley 
Warner Philadelphia zone manager Ted Schlan- 
ger presents $700 in U. S. Bonds to Dominick 
Lucente, manager of SW's Broadway for top- 
notch work during a recent showmanship drive. 
5hown left to right are Paul Castello, district 
nanoger; Bernie Brooks, assistant zone manager; 
Lucente and Schlanger. Bottom: Manager 
Julian Katz (left) of Randforce Amusement's 
Messerole Theatre in Brooklyn, N. Y. is gifted 
with a SI 00 prize by MGM branch manager Lou 
Allerhand (center) for his first-class showman- 
ship campaign on "High Society" during the 
circuit's Better Business Drive. Looking on is 
Charles Felleman, field-press representative. 

'Pride and Passion' Cannon 
Set for Cross-Country Tour 

An 8,500 mile junket that will cover 63 
key cities in the 32 United Artists exchange 
areas has been announced by promotion 

[chief Roger H. Lewis, for the giant-size 
four-ton cannon used in the filming of Stan- 

' ley Kramer's "The Pride and the Passion". 
Cost of the five-month promotional trek for 
the 31-foot artillery showpiece is budgeted 
at a whopping $52,000. 

I The tour will be directed by exploitation 
I chief Mori Krushen, who will be assisted by 
a special promotional squad working hand- 
in-hand with the company's field exploiteers. 

The mammoth cannon is undergoing final 
preparations for the trek at San Pedro Cali- 
fornia, having arrived recently from a 5,000 
mile sea voyage from Spain, where Kramer 
shot "The Pride and the Passion". "The 
Gun", as it is called in the film, is an authen- 
tic copy of a famous 19th-century artillery 
piece used by the Spaniards to fight-off a 
Napoleonic invasion. The multi-million- 
dollar VistaVision production, is slated for 
release this summer. 

Theatre-front and school stands will be 
part of the campaign in each of the 63 cities 
and their suburbs. The promotional excur- 
sion is also being scheduled for a host of re- 
tail tie-ups and cooperation with educational 
institutions. Accompanying the coast-to- 
coast exhibit will a be display of supplemen- 
tary weapons and costumes used in filming 
the UA release, which stars Cary Grant, 
Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren. 

Now in preparation for the tour are 
posters, banners, heralds, brochures and 
miniature replicas. Also planned are on-the- 
spot telecasts in the various cities, interviews 
for members of the "P and P" production 
and technical staffs with fourth estaters and 
intensive all-media coverage. 



WB's 'Morningstar' Hopefuls 
Screen Tests on Sullivan Show 

One of the most coveted Hollywood roles 
in many a moon, that of "Marjorie Morning- 
star" in the screen version of the best-selling 
novel by Herman Wouk, is open for bids — 
and publicity. In a television first, columnist 
Ed Sullivan, on his Sunday night variety 
shows of February 3 and 10, is going to pre- 
sent the actual screen tests of four young 
fern thespians vying for the juicy title role 
in the Milton Sperling production which 
Warner Bros, will release. 




Five of the young actresses being screen 
tested for the star-making title role in 
"Marjorie Morningstar" board plane for 
flight to Warners' California studios. 

The Sunday night televiewers will be in- 
vited to comment on the performances of the 
actresses, who will be seen in parts of three 
separate scenes from "Marjorie Morning- 
star" screen tests filmed at Warner Brothers 
Burbank studios. 

In a vigorous effort to hypo interest in the 
production, the television audience will be 
asked to write to the CBS-TV entertainer 
and indicate its favorites in the cathode-tube 
tests and, or recommend others for the role. 
Highlighted on the Feb. 10 program will be 
a Sullivan interview with producer Milton 
Sperling. Sperling and his staff have already 
interviewed several hundred aspirants for the 
part which shapes up as one of the biggest 
plums ever offered a young actress. 



Universal-International's "Battle Hymn" gar- % 
nered a pair of important publicity breaks in 
separate countries. Top: Clergyman-jet pilot 
Col. Dean Hess, on whose life the CinemaScope- 
Technicolor film is based, fans some promotional 
sparks in Toronto on a visit masterminded by 
U-l publicity chief, Philip Gerard. Left to right 
are Jack Clark, manager of Loew's Ontario; 
Gerald Pratley of the Canadian Broadcasting 
Corp.; Hess; the Toronto Star's Jack Karr; Jim 
Harrison, Regional Theatres in Canada. Bottom: 
Col. Hess feted at a luncheon hosted by Ohio 
Senator John W. Bricker (center) in the United 
States Capitol. Also on hand was Vice President 
Richard Nixon. On the Senate floor, after lunch- 
eon, Bricker paid tribute to "the flying parson". 



Schine 'Books of Happiness' 
Make Potent B.O., P.R. Tools 

By offering substantial savings on movie 
tickets to the theatregoing public via a 
scripbook promotion, the Schine Circuit is 
garnering sock returns both on the public re- 
lations front and at the boxoffice window. 

Tabbed with the smooth selling name, 
"Books of Happiness", the scrip books con- 
tain $5.00 worth of movie tickets and are sold 
to patrons at a money-saving $3.50 price. 
Good ac any Schine theatre anywhere, the 
"happiness coupons" are exchanged at the 
boxoffice for regular admission tickets and 
are used just like cash. The books are good 
for three months from the date of purchase. 

Because the "books" make ideal gifts, the 
five-state theatre chain has had great success 
in selling them as Xmas, birthday, gradu- 
ation and anniversary presents. A plan has 
also been adopted whereby civic, church and 
charitable organizations seeking funds can 
become the selling agent for the "Books of 
Happiness", and a handsome commission is 
paid them as a contribution to their causes. 

When films are shown on a road show 
basis at advanced prices, scrip-book holders 
get an extra dividend because they are ad- 
mitted to the theatre without having to pay 
the extra admission prices. 

'Bridge on River Kwai" Tie-up 

While the cameras are grinding in far-off 
Ceylon filming Columbia's "The Bridge On 
The River Kwai", an unusual tie-up to hypo 
interest in the Sam Spiegel production has 
been set between the Tourist Bureau of Cey- 
lon and Horizon Pictures for a batch of 
twelve special mailings of brochures, news 
releases and "souvenir" items to motion pic- 
ture exhibitors in every corner of the world. 

The mailings, which will also cover all 
segments of mass and travel media, will in- 
clude full credits to the Technicolor film, 
photographs of the film in production and 
news copy on the Ceylon location. 




Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 29 



EXPLOITATION PICTURE 



Batlle of Sexes Highlights ^Secret Affair' 



The battle of the sexes has been respon- 
sible for putting movie audiences in a de- 
lightful uproar, as witness such cause 
celebres as "It Happened One Night" and 
"The Awful Truth" among a host of other 
male vs. female comedy successes. Now 
Warner Bros, has another that makes a bid 
for fame in this distinguished group, same 
being "Top Secret Affair". WB is touting 
the comedy angle for all its worth in a bang- 
up campaign that sells laughs and a pair of 
marquee-bright stars. 

Anticipating no argument as to the risible 
fame of its great comedy of last year, "Mr. 
Roberts", the WBoxofncers have pegged a 
clever series of ads associating the laugh- 
provoking assets of "Top Secret Affair" with 
those of the earlier boxoffice smash. Such 
lines as: "A one-in-a-million happiness- 
maker just like 'Mister Roberts'!" . . . and 
. . . " 'I haven't laughed like this since 
"Mister Roberts"!' — Who said it? Just about 
everyone who sees this motion picture!" are 
sure to pique the interest of the millions who 
saw last year's comedy hit and the millions 
more who are sorry they missed it. 

Another well-turned phrase to perk up the 
interest of the discriminating— and those 
who believe themselves to be — is the catch- 
line: "The funniest story of love-making 
since comedies grew up!" 

The stars' appearance in their first comedy 
is well worth ballyhooing. With Kirk Doug- 
las riding high on his dramatic laurels for 
"Lust for Life" and Susan Hayward, well up 
on the list of top boxoffice stars, getting an 
interesting change of pace from her Oscar- 
nominee role in "I'll Cry Tomorrow", the 
pairing is an inspired one due to be an im- 
portant factor in the campaign. 

There's fine promotion fodder in the Hay- 
ward vs. Douglas fracas that runs through- 
out the film. With Kirk portraying the 
Army's toughest general and Susan digging 
her pretty teeth into the role of a big-time 
lady publisher out to keep the young Gen- 
eral from getting a diplomatic post with no 
holds barred, the publicity door is wide open 
for stunts and gimmicks based on the war 
of the sexes. Famed examples of history 
can be rung in with takeoffs on Samson and 
Delilah, Caesar and Cleopatra, Napoleon and 
Josephine, you can go on ad infinitum (so 
can the public in a contest for the longest 
list of male-female contrariety). The WB 
staff has turned out several mats based on 
this feature, working with jingles, quips and 
other light-hearted material in keeping with 
the tone of the film. 

The stunt potential is tops for the enter- 
prising showman. In the film, the lady goes 
to outlandish lengths to discredit the gen- 
eral, including inducing Kirk to do a balanc- 
ing act on a bongo board, tossing him onto 
a martini-laden night-club table during a 
Samba, getting him to display his judo tech- 
nique — on a woman, and generally putting 
him through a workout that will make him 




Congrats to them-- 
they're the stars who 
bring you the Warner 
picture that's a 
one-in-a-million 
happiness-maker 
just like Warners' 
'Mister Roberts'! 



Hayward and Kirk Douglas 
|vinga"Tbp Secret Affair" 



NEWSPAPER ADS 



look ridiculous. Thus is suggested a bongi 
board contest in the lobby or on stage wil 
the local bongo board dealer supplying thi 
props and demonstrator in a co-op promo- 
tion that should combine fun and entertain- 
ment with the drum-beating. Or a judo ex- 
pert who will give a demonstration anc 
lessons in the lobby or in a store geared foi 
a co-op handling. 

The title can be tied in beautifully with 
department store co-ops, flyers, peep boxes 
Arrangements should be made with a local 
store to hang a sign in front of the curtains 
used when they dress up the window: "We; 
can't let you see just yet because it's a 'Top 
Secret Affair' . . .", then combining stills with 
the window display to follow up the promo- 
tion. A good lobby display would have 
scenes from the film in a peep box which 
would be captioned appropriately with thej 
title. 

Posters are lightly provocative. The 24- 
sheet features a giant shot of the stars simi- 
lar to the bulk of the ad art against a plain 
background with only the words: "Susan 
Hayward and Kirk Douglas are having a 
'Top Secret Affair'!" The one-sheet uses the 
same art plus a small corner shot of a stern,; 
full dress General Douglas captioned "This 
is the toughest general in the U. S. Army!" 
followed up by a balloon caption from Miss 
Hayward: "This is the toughest general in 
the U. S. Army?" The 24-sheet is also par- 
ticularly adaptable for a marquee-top sign 
since the principals can be easily cut out and 
the copy worked into a block to eye-catch- 
ing effect. 

There have been few top-drawer comedies 
since the advent of the wide screen and it 
can logically be assumed that the public is 
ripe for something like "Top Secret Affair' 

"TOP SECRET AFFAIR' 



When a determined military man and an equally determined career i — N. 
giri clash, kiss and then find their whole affair being aired by a Con- 
gressional Committee, the results are likely to be provocative, to say the least. 
In "Top Secret Affair", Kirk Douglas and Susan Hayward are accorded a wide 
range of comic situations and dialogue that should make their fans chortle happi- 
ly and leave them quite satisfied when the dramatic climax anchors the earlier 
light proceedings for solid entertainment. The Roland Kibbee-Allan Scott script 
has Kirk as an iron-pants general whose appointment to a diplomatic post, sub- 
ject to Senate approval, rouses the ire of political magazine publisher Susan. She 
promptly evolves a plan of attack to make sure the general won't get a congres- 
sional okay by personally getting him involved in a series of undignified inci- 
dents, sees that they are all well-documented. Her plot, however, backfires when 
her heart enters the picture and falls for the officer. Previously disillusioned by a 
romance, he turns her offer of marriage down and the scorned woman reverts to 
her original plan, which includes a serious charge against Kirk of revealing 
secrets to a spy. The affair is resolved happily in a dramatic Committee hearing 
in which she admits framing the general, and the spy charge turns out to be a top 
secret counter spy affair which Douglas had conducted under orders. The War- 
ner Bros, film was produced by Martin Rackin under the supervision of Milton 
Sperling with H. C. Potter directing. 



Page 



3ULLETIN February 




Film BULLETIN February 4, 1957 Page 31 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



AH The Vital Details on Current &) Coming Features 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



ALLIED ARTISTS 



September 

CALLING HOMICIDE Bill Elliot. Jeane Cooper, Kath- 
leen Case. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Edward 
Bernds. Melodrama. Policeman breaks baby extortion 
racket. 61 min. 

FIGHTING TROUBLE Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements, 
Queenie Smith. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director George 
Blair. Comedy drama. Bowery Boys apprehend hood- 
lums by fast work with a camera. 61 min. 
STRANGE INTRUDER Edward Purdom, Ida Lupino, Ann 
Harding, Jacques Bergerac. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Irving Rapper. Drama. A returning Korean vet 
makes a strange promise to a dying comrade-in-arms. 
81 min. 

October 

CRUEL TOWER. THE John Ericson, Mari Blanchard, 
Charles McGraw. Producer Lindstey Parsons. Director 
Lew Landers. Drama. Steeplejacks fight for woman 
on high tower. 80 min. 

YAOUI DRUMS Rod Cameron, Mary Castle. Producer 
William Broidy. Director Jean Yarbrough. Western. 
Story of a Mexican bandit. 71 min. 

November 

BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in the death cell. 74 min. 
FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Mariorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Quaker family during the Civil War. 139 min. 1 0/ 1 

December 

HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 
HOT SHOTS Huntr Hall, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 42 min. 

January 

CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

GUN FOR A TOWN Dale Robertson, Brian Keith, 
Rossano Rory. Producer Frank Woods. Director Brian 
Keith. Western. 72 min. 

February 

ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 68 min. 

LAST OF THE BADMEN CinemaScope, Color. George 
Montgomery, James Best. Producer Vincent Fennelly. 
Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws use detective 
as onJy recogni»abLe man in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 
NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 67 min. 

March 

FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT Bill Elliot, Don Haggerty. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Melo- 
drama. Man is sought by police for murder of his 
friend. 

JEANNIE CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony Martin, 
Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Director 
Henry Levin. Musical. Small-town girl meets washing 
machine inventor in Paris. 105 min. 

Coming 

DAUGHTER Of DR. JEKYLL John Agar, Gloria Talbot, 
Arthur Shields. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar Unger. Horror. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 
Freeman, Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 
stockade in small western town. 81 min. 
HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle wilh unscrupulous hypnotist. 
61 min. 

HUNCHBACK OF PARIS, THE CinemaScope, Color. 
Glna Lollobrigida, Anthony Quinn. A Paris Production. 
Director Jean Delannoy. Drama. Hunchback falls in 
love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 
LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wilder. Drama. 



OKLAHOMAN. THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
of unscrupulous brothers. 81 min. 

SIERRA STRANGER Howard Duff, Gloria McGhee. 
Western. 75 min. 



COLUMBIA 



October 

PORT AFRIQUE Technicolor. Pier Angelli, Phil Carey, 
Dennis Price. Producer David E. Rose. Director Rudy 
Mate. Drama. Ex-Air Force flyer finds murderer of 
his wife. 92 min. 9/17. 

SOLID GOLD CADILLAC, THE Judy Holliday, Paul 
Douglas, Fred Clark. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Filimiiation of the famous 
Broadway play about a lady stockholder in a large 
holding company. 99 min. 8/20. 

STORM CENTER Bette Davis, Brian Keith, Paul Kelley, 
Kim Hunter. Producer Julian Blaustein. Director Daniel 
Taradash. Drama. A librarian protests the removal of 
"controversial" from her library, embroils a small 
town in a fight. 85 min. 8/6. 

November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdanald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD, THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 
graphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
Yves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 

WHITE SQUAW, THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bick- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 

December 

LAST MAN TO HANG, THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE Takashi Shimura, Tochiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Akira Kurosawa. 
Metodrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/iO 

RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY. THE Technicolor. Randolph Scott, 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the glory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 

January 

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, Alan Dal*. Producer Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor Fred Sears. Musical Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 1/7. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest, Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
becomes notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 

February 

NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray, Anne Bancroft. Producer Ted 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaken 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money. 
78 min. 12/10. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun, Susan Cummings, Angela 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred Sears. 
Western. Two men join hands because they see in each 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 75 min. 
WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Fhil Carey. Pro- 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. A 
beautiful airl wins a beauty contest and a "different" 
life. 132 min. 1/21. 



March 

FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rita 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A War- 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drama. 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is in- 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 

FULL OF LIFE Judy Holliday, Richard Conte, 
Salvatore Baccaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wife 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival of 
child. 91 min. 1/7. 

Coming 

BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. Cor- 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Direc- 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men seek 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Grayson, 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
Sears. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/15 
GARMENT JUNGLE. THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Mat- 
thews, Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. Di- 
rector Robert Aldrich. Drama. 

GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murptiy, Kathryn 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brown. Director George 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women to 
fight off Indian attack. 

KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller, Carol Thurston. Pro- 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad- 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-man 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroyed 
by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

MOST WANTED WOMAN, THE Victor Mature, Anita 
Ekberg, Trevor Howard. A Warwick Production. Di- 
rector John Gilling. 

PAPA, MAMA, THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureux, 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul Le 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisian 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW. THE Betty Garrett, Phil 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Director 
William Asher. Melodrama. Seven-year old boy is the 
only witness to a murder. 

STRANGE ONE, THE Ben Gazzara, James Olsen, George 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James Gar- 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames com- 
mander and his son. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atle 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor- 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in World 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL T, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone, Maureen 
Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Director Budd 
Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles o be 
independent. 

27TH DAY. THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Producer 
Helen Ainsworth. Director' William Asher. Science- 
fiotion. People from outer space plot to destroy all 
human life on the earth. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY. THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmore. 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Drama. 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



October 

GUNSLINGER Color I American-International ) John Ire- 
land, Beverly Garland, Alison Hayes. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Western. A notorious gunman terrorizes 
the West. 

PASSPORT TO TREASON (Astor Pictures) Rod Camer- 
on, Lois Maxwell. Producers R. Baker, M. Berman. 
Director Robert Baker. Drama. Private investigator 
stumbles upon a strange case of murder. 70 min. 
RIFIFI . . . MEANS TROUBLE (United Motion Picture 
Organization) Jean Servais, Carl Mohner. Director 
Jules Dassis. Melodrama. English dubbed story of 
the French underworld. 120 min. 11/12. 
SWAMP WOMEN IWoolner) Color. Carole Mathews, 
Beverly Garland, Touch Connors. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Adventure. Wild women in the Louisiana 
bayous. 

November 

MARCELINO (United Motion Picture Organization) 
Pabilto Calvo, Rafael Rivelles. Director Ladislao 
Vadja. Drama. Franciscan monks find abandoned baby 
and adopt him. 90 min. 11/12. 

SECRETS OF LIFE IBuena Vista). Latest in Walt Dis- 
ney's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/29. 
SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROCK (American-International) 
Lisa Gaye, Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson. 
Director Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 
roll" music. 



Film 



BULLETIN— THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



FEBRUARY SUMMARY 

At this early date, the March release 
calendar already shows 16 features on 
the roster. Later additions should add an- 
other dozen or so pictures. 20th Century- 
Fox and Universal-International will re- 
lease three each; Allied Artists, Colum- 
bia. Paramount and RKO, two each; 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and United Ar- 
tists, two each. Ten of the March films 
will be in color. Four releases will be in 
CinemaScope, one in VistaVision. 

7 Dramas 3 Adventures 

2 Westerns 3 Comedies 

1 Musical 



IIVEE GORDIE (George K. Arthur) Bill Travers, Elastair 
Him, Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 
■frank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 
lltature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwing cham- 
llionship. ?4 min. I 1/12. 

VESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS (Buena Vista I Cine- 
||iaScope. Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kathleen Crowley. 
I|\ Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 

December 

IABY AND THE BATTLESHIP, THE IDCA) Richard 
i i vttenborough, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
I jorough. Director Jay Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 

muggled aboard a British battleship during mock 
f ' naneuvers. 

iED OF GRASS ITrans-Lux) Anna Brazzou. Made in 
Jreece. English titles. Drama. A beautiful girl is per- 
ecuted by her villiage for having lost her virtue as 
J[ he victim of a rapist. 

HOUR OF DECISION lAstor Picturesl Jeff Morrow. 
• ! Drama. 

.A SORCIERE [Ellis Films) Marina Vlady, Nicole 
• ^ourel. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A young French 
■ ngineer meets untamed forest maiden while working 
n Sweden. French dialogue. English subtitles. 

MEN OF SHUnWOOD FOREST lAstor Pictures) East- 
I -nan Color. Don Taylor. Producer Michael Carreras. 

Director Val Guest. Adventure. Story of Robin Hood 
j and his men. 78 min. 

ROCK, ROCK. ROCK IDCA). Alan Freed, LaVern 
Baker, Frankie Lyman. A Vanguard Production. Musical 
I panorama of rock and roll. 

SNOW WAS BLACK. THE IContinental ) Daniel Gelin. 
Valentine Tessier. A Tellus Film. French language film. 
Drama. Study of an embittered young man who lives 
with mother in her house of ill fame. 105 min. 

TWO LOVES HAVE I IJacon) Technicolor. Gabriele 
Ferzetti, Marta Toren. A Rizzoli Fflm. Director Carmine 
Gallone. Drama. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 
best known operas. 

January 

ALBERT SCHWEITZER (Hill and Anderson) Eastman 
Color. Film biography of the famous Nobel Prize win- 
ner with narritive by Burgess Merideth. Producer-direc- 
; tor James Hill. Documentary. 

BULLFIGHT (Janus). French made documentary offers 
history and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
and directed by Pierre Braunberger. 74 min. 11/24. 

FEAR lAstor Pictures) Ingrid Bergman, Mathias Wie- 
I man. Director Roberto Rossellini. Drama. Young 
married woman is mercilessly exploited by blackmailer. 
B4 min. 

VITTELONI (API-Janus). Franco Interlenghi, Leonora 
Fabrizi. Producer Mario de Vecchi. Director F. Fel- 
; lini. Comedy. Story of unemployed young men in Italy. 
101 min. 11/24. 

WE ARE ALL MURDERERS (Kingsley International I 
Marcel Mouloudji, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
Gayette. Drama. 

February 

HOUR OF DECISION [Astor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
Hazel Court. Producer Monty Berman. Director Denn- 
ington Richards. Melodrama. Columnist's wife is in- 
nocently involved in blackmail and murder. 70 min. 

ROCK ALL NIGHT I American-International) Dick 
Miller, Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Rock n' roll musical. 

TEMPEST IN THE FLESH (Pacemaker Picturesl Ray- 
mond Pellegrin, Francoise Arnoul. Director Ralph 
Habib. French film, English titles. Drama. Study of a 
young woman with a craving for love that no number 
of men can satisfy. 

Coming 

CITY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen, Robert 
Hutton, Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Petroff. 
Drama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 

IF ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . (Buena Vista) 
Andre Valmy, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 
Drama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 
their efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 

IT CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International) 
Peter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 
space takes control of the world until a scientist gives 
his life to save humanity. 

LOST CONTINENT IIFE) CinemaScope, Ferranicolor. 
Producer-director Leonardo Bonzi. An excursion into the 
wilds of Borneo and the Maylayan Archepelago. Eng- 
lish commentary. 86 min. 

NEAPOLITAN CAROUSEL (IFE) (Lux Film, Rome) Pathe- 
color. Print by Technicolor. Sophia Loren, Leonid* 
Massine. Director Ettore Giannini. Musical. The history 
of Naples traced from 1400 to date in song and dance. 
OKLAHOMA WOMAN (American Releasing Corp.) 
Superscope. Richard Denning, Peggie Castle, Cathy 
Downs. Producer-director Roger Corman. Western. A 
ruthless woman rules the badlands until a reformed 
outlaw brings her to justice. 80 min. 

REMEMBER, MY LOVE (Artists-Producers Assoc.) Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer, 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

RUNAWAY DAUGHTERS (American-International) 
Maria English, Anna Sten. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
rector Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
age problems. 



SMOLDERING SEA. THE Superscope. Producer Hal E. 
>~nester. Drama. Conflict Derween The lyronn.cai cao- 
tain and crew of an American mercnant snip reacnes 
its climax ouxing battle of Guadalcanal 

UNDEAD, THE lAmerican-lnternational) Pamela Dun- 
can, AltUon Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 

WEAPON, THE SuDerscooe. Nicole Maurey. Producer 
Hal E Chester. Drama. An unsolved muroer involving 
• bitter U. S. war veieran, a German war brioe ano a 
killer is resolved after a child finas a loaaea gun in 
Domo ruODie 

WOMAN OF ROME iDCA) Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
Gelin. A Ponti-DeLaurentiis Production. Director Luigi 
Zampa. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
novel. 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 



October 

JULIE Doris Day, Louis Jourdain. Producer Marty 
Melcher. Director Andrew Stone. Drama. Jealous hus- 
band plans to kill wife. 9? min. 10/15. 

OPPOSITE SEX, THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
June Alyyson, Joan Collins, Dolores Grav. Proaucer 
Joe Pasternak. Director David Miller. Comedy. The 
perfect wife is unaware of flaws in her marriage until 
a gossip friend broadcasts the news. 114 min. 10/1. 
POWER AND THE PRIZE CinemaScope. Robert Taylor 
Burl Ives, Elisabeth Mueller. Director Henry Koster. 
Producer Nicholas Nayfak. Drama. Tale of big business 
and international romance. 98 min. 9/17. 

November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, Bob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
87 min. 1/21. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME, THE Tom Ewell, Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 

TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON, THE Cinema- 
Scope, Eastman Color. Marlon Brando, Glenn Ford, 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Comedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 
123 min. 10/29. 

January 

ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson, Martine Carol, Gustave Rojo. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. Beautiful girl seeks help of con- 
traband runner to rescue brother from Communists. 

EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 85 min. 1/7. 

SLANDER Van Johnson, Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutsch. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 81 min. 1/7. 

February 

BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET, THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gielgud. Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director' Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. Love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 105 min. 1/21. 

HOT SUMMER NIGHT Leslie Nielsen. Coleen Miller. 
Producer Morton Fine. Director David Friedkin. Melo- 
drama. Story of a gangland hide-out. 84 min. 

WINGS Of THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne, Dan 
Dailey, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. Life and times of a naval 
aviator. 110 min. 

March 

HAPPY ROAD, THE Gene Kelly, Michael Redgrave, 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors. Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 

Coming 

DESIGNING WOMAN Gregory Peck. Lauren Bacall, 
Dolores Gray. Producer Dore Schary. Director Vincente 
Minnelli. Ace sportswriter marries streamlined blond 
with ideas. 100 min. 

LITTLE HUT, THE MetroColor. Ava Gardner, Stewart 
Granger. Comedy. Husband, wife and wife's lover are 
marooned on a tropical isle. 93 min. 

LIVING IDOL, THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Al Lewin. Drama. An archeologist is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle 1 800's. 

SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson, Dana Wynter, 
Wendy Hitler. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. Stry of a Mau Mau uprising 
in Kenya, East Africa. 

TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberghetti. Producer 
Joieph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 



THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT Jean Simmons Paul 
Douglas. Comedy. A girl fresh out of college gets a 
job as secretary to an ex-bootlegger. 

VINTAGE, THE Pier Angeli, Mel Ferrer. Leif Erickson. 
Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Jeffrey Hayden. Dra- 
ma A conflict between young love and mature re- 
sponsibility. 



PARAMOUNT 



October 

SEARCH FOR ERIDEY MURPHY. THE Louis Hayward. 
Teresa Wright. Producer Pat Duggan. Director Noel 
Langley. Drama. The famous book by Morey Bernstein 
on film. 84 min. 

November 

MOUNTAIN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane hat 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in the 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about the 
movies. 95 min. 12/10. 

WAR AND PEACE VistaVision Technicolor. Audrey 
Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer. Producers Carte 
Ponti Dino de Laurenriis Director King Vioor. Drama 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 

January 

THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 

100 min. 1/7. 

February 

RAINMAKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster, Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 

March 

FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden. 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of the Boston baseball player. 
OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget. Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure. 
The life and times of medieval Persia's literary idol. 

Coming 

BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N.Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 

BUSTER KEATON STORY, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth. Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. 

DELICATE DELINQUENT. THE Jerry Lewie, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. 

FLAMENECA VistaVision, Technicolor. Carmen SevlUa, 
Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director Don- 
ald Siegel. 

FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audrey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens. Director Stanley Donen. Musical. 



F I I 



■ ULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



GUNFIGHT AT O.K. CORRAL VistaVision, Technicolor 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Flaming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallit. Director John Sturgas. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his chaating 
brothar. 

JOKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. F'ink Sinatra, 
Mitii Gaynor. Jeanne Crain. Producer "viuel Briskin. 
Director Charles Vidor. Drama. 

LONELY MAN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Parkins, Elaina Aikan. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he is losing his sight — and his atm. 
TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE VistaVision T ec hnicolor 
Charlrun Mesron Yul Brynner, Anne Bair'a' °roaucer- 
director Cecil t DeMille Relioious drama Life storv 
of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 219 min. 10/15 
TIN STAR. THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda, Anthony 
Perkins. A PerlSerg-Seaton Production. Director An- 
thony Mann. V fern. 



REPUBLIC 



October 

SCANDAL INCORPORATED Robert Hufton, Paul Rich- 
ards, Patricia Wright. A C.M.B. Production. Director 
Edward Mann. Drama. Expose of scandal magazines 
preying on movie stars and other celebrities. 79 min. 
MAN IS ARMED. THE Dane Clark, William Tallman, 
May Wynn. Associate producer Edward White. Director 
Franklin Adreon. Melodrama. Young man is tricked 
into life of crime by crooked boss. 70 min. 

November 

A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker, 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 

CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope. Trucolor. 
Johanna Matz, Rudolf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intrigue and mystery in Vienna during 
the time of Prince Metternich. 

December 

ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor, Naturama. David 
Brian, Vera Ralston. Melodrama. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland 
lawyer is murdered by attractive girl singer. 74 min. 
IN OLD VIENNA Trucolor. Heinz Roettinger, Robert 
Killick. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal. Romances and triumphs of Frani Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 

January 

ABOVE UP THE WAVES John Mills. John Gregson 
Donald Sinden. Producer W. MacQuirty. Director Ralph 
Thomas. Drama. Midget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWII. 92 min. 1/21. 
TEARS FOR SIMON Eastman Color. David Farrar, 
David Knight, Julia Arnall. A J. Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama. Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child stolen. 91 min. 

February 

AFFAIR IN RENO Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G. Spring- 
stein. Drama. Young heiress falls for fortune-hunting 
gambler. 

Coming 

DUEL AT APACHE WELLS Naturama, Trucolor. Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Western. Son returns home to 
find father's ranch threatened by rustler-turned-rancher. 

70 min. 

HELL'S CROSSROADS Naturama. Stephen McNally, 
Peggie Castle, Robert Vauhgn. Producer Rudy Ral- 
ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after joining Jesse James' gang. 73 min. 
SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Trucolor, Naturama. Vera 
Ralston, Rod Cameron. Producer-director Joe Kane. 
An unscrupulous lumberman tries to coerce the owners 
of a large forest acreage into cutting their timber at 
a faster rate. 




October 

FINGER OF GUILT Richard Basehart, Mary Murphy, 
Constance Cummings. Producer-director Alec Snowden. 
Drama. Film producer receives letters from a girl he 
never met, who insists they were lovers. 84 min. 11/26 
TENSION AT TABLE ROCK Color. Richard Egan, 
Dorothy Malone, Cameron Mitchell. Producer Sam 
Weisenthal. Director Charles Warren. Western. The 
victory of a town over violence. 93 min. 10/29. 

November 

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL George Sanders, Yvonne 
DeCarlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor. Producer-director Sharles 
Martin. Melodrama. Tale of an international financial 
wizard. 119 min. 11/12. 

December 

MAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg, Bill Campbell, 
Karen Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A young locksmith aets 
involved with a group engaged in illegal activities. 
73 min. 1/7. 



January 

BRAVE ONE, THE CinemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
Ray, Fannin Rivera, Jov Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. Pro- 
ducer Frank a Mavrice King. Director Irving Rapper. 
Drama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
trows ao with a bull as his main companion and friend 
and how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 
BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Debbie 
Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Adolph Mengou. Producer Ed- 
mund Grainger. Director Norman Tauro^ Comedy. 
Son of department store magnet falls '. salesgirl. 
98 min. 12/24. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 

YOUNG STRANGER. THE James MacArthur, Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Franken- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 
parents. 

February 

CYCLOPS, THE James Craig, Gloria Talbot. Science- 
fiction. 

GUILTY Technicolor. .1 *in Justin, Barbara Laage. 
Drama. 

SILKEN AFFAIR. THE David Niven, Genevieve Page, 
Ronald Sauire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director Roy 
Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on a kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 min. 

THAT NIGHT John Beal, Augusta Dabney, Shepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Director John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a 15- 
year-old marriage. 

X— THE UNKNOWN Dean Jagger, William Russell. 
Science-fiction. 

March 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY. THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 
RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 

Comms 

ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY. THE Eastman Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublin. 
Director Mitchell Leison. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking second place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 

JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hugnes Production. Producer 
Jules Furthman Director Josef von Sterneerg. Drama. 

UNHOLY WIFE. THE Color. Diana Dors. Rod Steiger, 
Marie Windsor. Producer-director John Farrow. Drama. 
A wife sunningly plots the death of her husband who 
she has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS, THE Arthur O'Connell, Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director John Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



October 

BETWEEN HEAVEN AND HELL CinemaScope. De- 
Luxe Color. Robert Wagner, Terry Moore. Producer 
David Weisbart. Director Robert Fleischer. War drama. 
World War II setting in he Pacific. 94 min. 10/29. 
STAGECOACH TO FURY CinemaScope. Forrest Tucker, 
Mari Blanchard, Wally Ford, Wright King. Producer 
Earle Lyon. Director William Claxton. Western. Mexican 
bandits hold up stage coach in search for gold. 76 min. 
TEENAGE REBEL CinemaScope. Ginger Rogers, Michael 
Rennie. Producer Charles Brackett. Director S. Engle. 
Comedy. Mother and daughter find mutual respect and 
devotion. 94 min. 10/29. 

November 

DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN. THE Robert Arthur, Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 
73 min. 11/26. 

LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley, Richard 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentucky 
locale. 89 min. I 1/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope, Technicolor. Gordon Mac- 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn- 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza- 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 

December 

ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg- 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler. 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Filmization of famous 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 



BLACK WHIP. THE Hugh Marlowe. Adele Mara. Pr< 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. Outla 
has black whip as trademark. 77 min. 
GIRL CAN'T HELP IT. THE CinemaScope, De Lux 
Color. Tom Ewell, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-directc 
Frank Tashlin. Comedy. Satire on rock V roll. 9: 
min. 1/7. 

OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michele Morgan, Corne 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd O 
wald. Director Yves Allgret. Drama. Gold smuggle 
falls in love with lady sent to kill him. Violent endinc 
84 min. 1/21. 

WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. Jame 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Productior 
Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 

January 

GUIET GUN. THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mar 
Morday. Western. Laramie sheriff clashes with notor 
ous gunman. 77 min. 

THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Milland, Ernes 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Phili 
Dunne. Drama. Government employee is wronged b 
too-zealous pursuit of security program. 89 min. 1/21. 

February 

BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina Lollobrigida, Vil 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Directo 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

OH, MEN! OH, WOMEN! CinemaScope, Color. Dai 
Daily, Ginger Rogers, David Niven. Producer-directo 
Nunnally Johnson. Comedy. A psychiatrist finds ou > 
somethings he didn't know. 

THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herber 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The live ; 
and times of America's famous outlaw gang. 

March 

HEAVEN KNOWS MR. ALLISON CinemaScope De Lux. 
Color. Deborah Kerr. Robert Mitchum. Producer > 
Buddy Adler, Eugene Frenke. Director John Huston 
Drama. Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific durint 
World War II. 

RIVER'S EDGE. THE CinemaScope, Color. Ray Milland i 
Anthony Quinn, Debra Paget. Producer Benidic • 
Bogeaus. Director Allan Dwan. Adventure. Story of £ I 
professional killer. 

STORM RIDER, THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers. A 
Brady-Glasser production. Director Edward Bernds 
Western. A dust storm brings a stranger to a small 
western town. 

Coming 

BOY ON A DOLPHIN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Colors 
Clifton Webb, Alan Ladd, Sophia Loren. Producer San* 
Engel. Director Jean Negulesco. Comedy. Romantic 
tale with a Greek background. 

BREAK IN THE CIRCLE Forrest Tucker, Eva Bartok. 
Producer M. Carreras. Director V. Guest. Drama. 
ISLAND IN THE SUN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. I 
James Mason, Joan Fontaine, Dorothy Dandridge. Pro- 
ducer Darryl Zanuck. Director Robert Rossen. Drama. 
RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brady, 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director AJan 
Dwan. 

SEA WIFE CinemaScope. DeLuxe Color. Richard Bur- 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director Bob 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarine 
off Singapore harbor. 

SHE-DEVIL. THE Mari Blanchard, Jack Kelly, Albert 
Dekker. Producer-director Kurt Neumann. 
SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Rich- 1 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Producer- 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussie boy ' 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 



UNITED ARTISTS 



October 

AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS I Michael Todd 
Productions! Todd-AO, Color. David Niven, Cantiflas, 
Martine Carn.'. Producer M. Todd. Director Michael 
Anderson. Adventure. Filmization of the famous Jules 
Verne novel. 175 min. 10/29. 

ATTACK Jack Palance, Eddie Albert, Lee Marvin. Pro- 
ducer-director Robert Aldrich. Drama. A cowardly 
army officer and his men during a crucial battle of 
World War II. 107 min. 9/17. 

BOSS, THE John Payne, Doe Avedon, William Bishop. 
Producer Frank Seltzer. Director Byron Haskin. Melo- 
drama. A city falls prey to a corrupt political ma- 
chine. 89 min. 9/17. 

FLIGHT TO HONG KONG Rory Ca'houn, Dolores Don-i 
Ion. A Sabre Production. Director Joe Newman. Drama. 
An airline flight to Hong Kong sparks international 
intrigue. 88 min. 10/15. 

MAN FROM DEL RIO Anthony Ouinn, Katy Jurat \ 
Producer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. Wes.- 
ern. Badman turns sheriff in lonely town. 82 min. 10/15 ? 

November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness, Angie Dickin- 
son. Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Director 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunman gets 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him when 
wounded. 78 min. 

PEACEMAKER. THE James Mitchell, Rosemarie Bowe, 
Jan Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post. 
Western. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattle- ■ 
men and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 



Film 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



UNITED ARTISTS I Conr inu.ai-l 
JNNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dowling 
I -thur Franz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Couffer 
I rector Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped fugi- 
i'es are chased by local townspeople and officer of 
lie law. 83 min. 11/12. 

HARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe, Color. Victor 
j ature, Karen Steele. Producer Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 
rector Jerry Hopper. Drama. Saga of the Navy's 
jnderwater-men". 73 min. 10/2?. 

December 

IASS LEGEND, THE Hugh O'Brian, Raymond Burr 
ancy Gates. Western. Producer Bob Geldstein Di- 
ctor Gerd Oswald. Western. 79 min. 
ANCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott, Lou Costello 
-oducer Robert Goldstein, Director Charles Barton 
omedy. 7? min. 12/24. 

ING AND FOUR QUEENS, THE CinemaScop- Color 

lark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet Jturi Willis 
, arbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 
l ead. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 1/7. 

r*ILD PARTY, THE Anthony Quinn, Caro | Ohmart Paul 
• tewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 

orner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval off i- 

er and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 



January 



IG EOODLE, THE Errol Flynn. Rossana Rory A Lewis 
! ■ Blumberg Production. Director Richard Wilson Ad- 
renture. A blackjack dealer in a Havana nightclub is 
Iccused of being a counterfeiter. 83 min. 
'IVE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden 

. Grand Production. Director Henry Kesler. Drama 
t. woman tries to give FBI highly secret material stolen 
i om Russians. 80 min. 

IALLI DAY B.1AND, THE Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lind- 
3rs, Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
oseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
sther and son with disaster. 77 min 



February 



;:RIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling 
Mayden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen Di- 
,ector Gerd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 
mbition for her husband leads to murder. 85 min. 1/7. 
iRANGO Jeff Chandler, Joanne Dru. An Earlmar Pro- 
uction. Hall Bartlett producer-director. Adventure 
Inion officers try to bring order to a Southern town 
fter the Civil War. 92 min. 

JEN IN WAR Robert Ryan, Aldo Ray, Robert Keith, 
•roducer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann. 
Irama. An American infantry platoon isolated in enemy 
erritory tries to retreat during the Korean War. 

OMAHAWK TRAIL John Smith, Susan Cummings A 
■el Air Production. Director Robert Parry. Western 
-owboy versus Indians. A small band of cavalry 
oldiers, greatly outnumbered, battles with Apache 
ndians at close of the Civil War. 61 min. 
rODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff, Beverly Tyler A Bel 
Vir Production. Director Reginald Le Borg. Horror, 
writer is called upon to investirite vodooism on a 
'acme isle. 



Coming 



IACHELOR PARTY. THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall 
lack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 
vlann. From the famous television drama by Paddy 
-hayefsky. ' 1 

3AILOUT AT 43.000 John Payne, Karen Steele. A Pine- 
Thomas Production. Director Francis Lyon. US Air 
-orce pioneers bailout mechanism for jet pilots. 
3IG CAPER. THE Rory Calhound, Mary Costa. Pine- 
Ihomas Production. Director Robert Stevens Multi- 
■nillion dollar payroll robbery. 

SIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS. THE Lex Barker, Anne 
Bancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production Di- 
•ector Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slayings 
terrorize western resort. 

HIDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
Aubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth. 
Drama. Police officer attempts to clear sister charged 
with murder. 

HIS FATHER'S GUN Dane Clark, Ben Cooper Lori Nel- 
son. Bel Air Production. Director Lesley Selander. Gun- 
slinger escapes from Jail to save son from life of 
crime. 

LONELY GUN. THE Anthony Ouinn, Katy Jurado Pro- 
ducer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 
MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD, THE Tim 

Holt Audrey Dalton. A Gramercy Production. Director 
Arnold Laven. Science-fiction. 

MONTE CARLO STORY. THE Technirama Color Mar- 
lene Dietrich, Vittorio De Sica. A Titanus Film. Sam 
faylor director. A handsome Italian nobleman with a 
love for gambling marries a rich woman in order to 
pay his debts. 

PHAROAH'S CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Howard Koch. Director Lee Sholem. Horror. Reincar- 
nation of mummies in Egyptian tombs. 
PRIDE AND THE PASSION, THE VistaVision Techni- 
color. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren. Pro- 
ducer-director Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
?n« rn " a band marcnes an incredible distance with a 
6000 pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
ence of 1810. 

REVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Dehner, Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
rector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
soldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 min. 
SAVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor. Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
A Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
tails in love with a peasant who contests her right 
to rule the kingdom. 101 min. 



STREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery Geraldine 
Brooks. Producer William Berke. Rookie' policeman 
clashes with youthful criminals. 

SPRING REUNION Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews Jean 



CROOPER HOOK Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck Ed- 
ward Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marouis 
Warren. A white woman, forced to live as an Indian 
Chief's squaw, is finally rescued and tries to resume 
life with husband. 

12 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb Jack 
Warden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sianey 
Lumet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 



U N I VERSA L- 1 NT' L 



October 

PILLARS OF THE SKY Technicolor. Jeff Chandler 
Dorothy Malone, Ward Bond. Producer Robert Arthur 
Director George Marshall. Drama. The spirit of Religion 
helps to settle war bewteen Indians and Cavalrymen 
in the Oregon Country. 95 min. 9/3. 

November 

UNGUARDED MOMENT. THE Technicolor. Esther Wil- 
liams, George Nader. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Drama. High school teacher is almost 
criminally assaulted by student. 95 min. 9/3. 

December 

CURCU. BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
Bromfield, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siodnak. Horror. Young 
woman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
are terrorized by mysterious jungle beast. 
EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
Maureen O'Hara, John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
dent gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 11/12. 
MOLE PEOPLE, THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror. 
Scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 



January 



FOUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
George Nader, Julie Adams, Marianne Cook. Producer 
A. Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
85 min. 12/10 

ROCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo, John Saxon Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
Bartlett. Musical. Rock n' roll story of college combo. 
89 min. 11/2*. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
Lauren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
smith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
violent death because of jealousy for wife. 99 min. 10/1 



February 



GREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
rer. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
idol. 92 min. 11/26. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope, Technicolor. Errol Rynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 84 min. 1/21. 

NIGHT RUNNER, THE Ray Danton, Colleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Biberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 

March 

BATTLE HYMN Technicolor. Rock Hudson, Martha Hyer, 
Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of guilt because of 
bombing of an orphanage by saving other orphans. 
108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD Technicolor. Fred MacMurray, 
Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Producer William Alland. 
Director Abner Biberman. Western. Three brothers run 
a cattle ranch after death of their father. 88 min. 1/7. 
MISTER CORY Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford. Producer 
Robert Arthur. Director Blake Edwards. Drama. Gam- 
bler from Chicago slums climbs to wealth and re- 
spectability. 92 min. 1/21. 

Corning 

INCREDIELE SHRINKING MAN, THE Grant Williams, 
Randy Stuart. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack 
Arnold. Science-fiction. The story of a man whose 
growth processes have accidently been reversed. 



81 

INTERLUDE Technicolor, CinemaScope. June Allyson, 
Rossano Brazzi. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy, George Nader, Kee.nan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. 
KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son, Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of deg- 
act in show business in the early I930's. 
MAN AFRAID Gecrge Nader, Tim Hovey. Producer 
Gordon Kay. Director Harry Keller. 

TAMMY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds. 
Lslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Ros3nberg. Director Joe 
Pevney. 

TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arnold. 



WARNER BROTHERS 



September 

A CRY IN THE NIGHT Edmond O'Brien. Natalie Wood, 
Brian Donlevy. A Jaguar Production. Director Frank 
Tyttle. Drama. Mentally unbalanced man surprises 
couple in Lover's Lane. 75 min. 8/20. 

AMAZON TRADER, THE WarnerColor. John Sutton. 
Producer Cedric Francis. Director Tom McGowan. Ad- 
venture. Stirring events in the Amazon territory of 
Brazil. 41 min. 

BAD SEED, THE Nancy Kelly, Patty McCormack. Henry 
Jones. Produced and directed by Mervyn LeRoy. Dra- 
ma. Film version of the famous Broadway play about 
a child murderess. 129 min. 

BURNING HILLS. THE CinemaScooe, WarnerColor. Tab 
Hunter, Natalie Wood. Skip Homeir. Producer Rich- 
ard Whorf. Director Stuart Heisler. Western. Young 
man seeks his brother's murderer. 92 min. 8/20. 



October 



TOWARD THE UNKNOWN WarnerColor William Hol- 
den, Lloyd Nolan, Virginia Leith. Producer-director 
Mervyn LeRoy. Drama. Test pilots experiment in jet 
and rocket propelled aircraft to probe outer space 
and physical limits of man. 115 min. 10/1. 

November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor. Rock Hudson, 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens. Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil. cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND, THE Tab Hunter. Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler. Drama. Army turns immature boy into man 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BA8Y DOLL Karl Maiden, Carroll Baker, Eli Wallach. 
A Newton Production. Producer-director Elia Kazan 
Drama. Story of a gin-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. I 14 min. 12/24. 



January 



WRONG MAN, THE Henry Fonda. Vera Miles, Anthony 
Quayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club Is prime suspect In 
murder case. 105 min. 1/7. 



February 



BIG LAND. THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd, Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move their herds to 
distant railroads. 93 min. 

TOP SECRET AFFAIR Kirk Douglas, Susan Hayward. 
Producer Martin Rackin. Director H. C. Potter. Come- 
dy. A lovely lady calls tha bluff of an Army General. 
93 min. 



Coming 



PARIS DOES STRANGE THINGS Technicolor. Ingrid 
Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco-London 
Film. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of the exiled 
widow of a Polish Prince. 

PRINCE AND THE SHOWGISL. THE Color. Marilyn 
Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Dame Sybil Thorndyke. 
Producer-director Laurence Olivier. Comedy. 
SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, THE CinemaScope, Warner- 
Color. James Stewart, Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director Billy Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlantic in a plane. 



To Better Serve You . . . 

Office & Terminol Combined At 
305 N. 12th St. New Phones 

Philadelphia 7, Pa. LOmbard 3-3944, 3945 

NEW JERSEY 
MESSENGER SERVICE 

Member National Film Carriers 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE! 

HIGHWAY 
EXPRESS LINES, INC. 

Member National Film Carriers 

Philadelphia, Pa.: LOcust 4-3450 
Washington, D. C: DUcsnt 7-7200 



BULLETIN— THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 




Produced by ALAN PAKULA • Directed 
by ROBERT MULLIGAN • Screenplay by 
TED BERKMAN and RAPHAEL BLAU 




BULLETIN 



•BRUARY 18, 1957 



Business-wise 
Analysis of 
the New Films 

Reviews: 

.,._Y FACE 

HE YOUNG STRANGER 

FEAR STRIKES OUT 

PHARAOH'S CURSE 

THE TRUE STORY 
OF JESSE JAMES 

-IE MAN WHO TURNED 
TO STONE 

SMILEY 

THOUSAND BEDROOMS 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE III 



BRING BACK 
THE WOMEN! 



Movies Topping TV in 
Public Appeal -Value Line 



COMPLETE TEXT OF LATEST V-L ANALYSIS 



lewpoints 

IARY 18, 1957 " VOLUME 25, NO. 4 



This Is the Time far Exhibitor Unity 



Indications that Allied States As- 
sociation is adopting a new pattern 
of conciliation and cooperation in its 
relations with the fi.m companies 
have cropped up repeatedly since the 
National Allied Convention in Dal- 
las last December. The theme was 
repeated at the organization's drive- 
in convention in Cincinnati and re- 
affirmed very recently by the new 
president, Julius M. Gordon. 

Mr. Gordon's predecessor. Rube 
Shor, who has retired after two 
years — he worked himself into a hos- 
pital bed more than once in his ef- 
forts on behalf of exhibition — was 
sincerely dedicated to bringing about 
harmony with the other national ex- 
hibitor body, Theatre Owners of 
America, as well as with the film 
companies. Mr. Gordon has taken 
up the baton with the same resolu- 
tion that inspired Mr. Shor to pursue 
the goal of harmony. Following his 
election by the board of directors, 
the new president vowed that he 
would "go to any length, at any 
time, with any group to meet and 
discuss problems of our industry." 

Allied's extension of the olive 
branch to distribution is, in itself, a 
laudatory gesture, demonstrating th e 
urgency with which this traditional- 
ly militant organization views the 
need for industry unity. Thus far, 
however, distribution has shown no 
inclination to grasp the proferred 
branch. Instead, we hear of un- 
named distribution spokesmen view- 
ing Allied's conciliatory attitude 
with a fishy eye. It is of such stuff 
that "statesmanship" in our industry 
is too often constituted. 

Exhibition — all of exhibition — 
must learn that if there is to be any 
effective bargaining done at the con- 
ference tables, it must be repre- 
sented by a voice that speaks for the 
full body of theatremen. This means 
collaboration between Allied and 
TOA on a basis never yet achieved. 



Such collaboration need not neces- 
sarily mean a merger. Actually, it 
is quite possible that a merger is less 
desirable in the interests of the great 
variety of theatremen represented 
by the two groups. But whether it 
be in one national organization or 
two, exhibition must have an instru- 
mental voice in the industry's affairs 
that will demand and receive the re- 
spect of the film companies, a voice 
that will carry weight on all vital 
matters affecting their relations with 
the producer-distributors. 

Both TOA and Allied have ex- 
pressed a desire to cooperate on sev- 
eral important issues — an industry 
arbitration system, a top-level con- 
ference to discuss trade practices, 
the reformation of COMPO. On all 
of these issues, statements from both 
groups indicate that they are in ac- 
cord. But nowhere is there a sign of 
any machinery to combine the com- 
mon objectives so that the two 
groups might work hand-in-hand to 
effectuate their proposals, to make 
the weight of their decisions felt. 

In this direction Film BULLE- 
TIN more than a year ago offered 
for consideration the idea of a "Con- 
gress of Exhibition" in which repre- 
sentatives of each national organiza- 
tion, as well as representatives from 
independent regional groups, would 
convene regularly to air the pressing 
issues of the day and formulate a 



BULLETIN 



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plan of action on matters of common 
aim. Proposals would be presented 
for discussion and as areas of agree- 
ment were reached, the voice of ex- 
hibition would be one, undivided 
and authoritative in its power. 

There would be no intrusion on 
the autonomy of the individual or- 
ganizations in such a plan. Concepts 
in which there was a difference of 
opinion would be left to the indi- 
vidual organizations to pursue. The 
sole purpose would be to establish 
liaison and to create an instrument 
for organized action. 

Some distributors are demonstrat- 
ing a growing predatory tendency 
that threatens the existence of many 
of their customers, and, ultimately, 
may destroy this entire industry. 
The presence of a powerful exhibi- 
tion body in the arena of industry 
discussion would do much to offset 
these suicidal attitudes. 

The need for a one-world of ex- 
hibition has never been greater than 
it is today. Our industry is in the 
throes of rebirth. Its form probably 
will be quite different from what it 
has been in the past. Exhibition 
must have its say in the re-shaping 
of the business, or suffer the status 
of a second-class appendage to the 
production-distribution powers. 

Nor have conditions for exhibition 
unity been more propitious. The 
heads of both TOA and Allied have 
pledged themselves to cooperation; 
they see eye-to-eye on virtually all 
of the important issues that would 
be topics for discussion in an all-in- 
dustry conference; they are seem- 
ingly utterly sincere in their efforts 
to accomplish unity. 

This is the ripe time for that per- 
ennial will o' the wisp, Exhibitor 
Unity, which has constantly eluded 
the industry's theatremen, to be 
nailed down, once and for all, as a 
force for balance and good in the 
movie industry. 



Film BULLETIN February 18. 1957 Page 3 



THE JEKYLL 
AND-HYDE 
GIRL" LIVED 
3 STRANGE 
LIVES! 




SHOOT THE 
WORKS! 

This is the kind of picture that gives 
showmen an irresistible urge to 
turn the town upside down with 
ballyhoo! A wonderful, exciting 
entertainment that will back up all 
the promises of your flying banners! 



M-G-M 



ELEANOR PARKER 

in the year's most remarkable performance 
as three different personalities in 




If 



Co-Starring 

RICHARD BOONE 

with 

JOAN BLONDELL • HUGO HAAS 

Screen Play by MEL DINELLI ' b y ^H*RIE Y JACKSON 
Directed by HUGO HAAS 

Produced by JERRY BRESLER 
A Bryna Production 
A Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Release 



BRAINSTORMING. A relatively new phonemona— called 
"brainstorming" — has been sweeping the big-business 
world with apparently much success. And there seems to 
be little reason, outside of vanity or plain stubbornness, 
why it couldn't be applied to the movie industry. In this 
business game, a round-table discussion is held on any 
problem. Every possible solution, no matter how seeming- 
ly absurd or far-fetched, is advanced and duly recorded. 
No one must say it can't be done, or that it has been tried 
previously without success. Ultimately, out of a possible 
100 ideas, perhaps only five or ten are considered possible 
solutions to the problem, these then being refined down to 
one or two. Not only does this method bring to a particu- 
lar problem a solution not previously thought valid, or, 
possibly, not previously even thought of, but it keeps the 
participants — especially departmental leaders and trouble- 
shooters — thinking positively and constructively without 
fear of being regarded as foolish or scatterbrained. It 
brings to all problems a fresh approach and, most impor- 
tantly, a workable solution. The movie industry executive- 
ship, in the main notorious for its insensitivity to new 
ideas, might find the "brainstorming" invaluable as a 
means for finding solutions to the new problems our indus- 
try faces in this age. Film men and theatremen alike 
should consider the novel idea as a device for developing 
new approaches to the competitive struggle with tele- 
vision. And what a wonderful technique "brainstorming" 
might be for getting constructive results from that elusive 
top-level conference between exhibition and distribution! 
0 

GIMMICK PICTURES. Theatremen are talking more and 
more about the surprising boxoffice performances of minor 
films that have special promotional gimmicks. Several of 
the rock 'n' roll films, for instance, have rolled up grosses 
far above what some of the year's costliest productions are 
showing. The same is the case with other off-beat shows. 
"Lust for Life", while hardly a minor entry, was some- 
thing different and showed a healthy take generally. Co- 
lumbia's "Rumble on the Docks" and "Don't Knock the 
Rock", ballyhoo combination, is responding very well to 
showmanship. Metro's cheapie, "Edge of the City", is 
proving a "sleeper". The Frenchie "Rififi" is getting wide 
distribution for a foreigner. All this seems to point up the 
avid public appetite for entertainment off the beaten path. 
No one seems to have time today to go to the movies for 
the commonplace ; enough of that on the little screen at 
home. 

0 

'PERSUASION' ENOUGH. Note was made in this de- 
partment recently that inadequate advance publicity is 
blamed by exhibitors for the failure of some fine films to 
gross as anticipated. A prominent theatreman was quoted 
as saying that worthy pictures too often are being rushed 
into first-run engagements before the publicity-advertising 
departments have had sufficient time to develop full-scale 
promotional campaigns. Result: the film is already in sub- 
runs by the time the public starts to respond. Allied Ar- 
tists' "Friendly Persuasion" was cited as one example of a 
film that "caught on" in its subsequent run bookings after 



l/l/hat Mey'te hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



disappointing in its first run performance. As a matter of 
fact — as several readers brought to our attention — the cam- 
paign on this picture was a particularly well-developed 
one. It was given a thorough advance build-up, beginning 
almost a full year before release. Unfortunately, other fac- 
tors were responsible for the slow start of "Persuasion" : 
the unusual subject matter, Quakerism, and what is gen- 
erally conceded to be a poor title. Admittedly this was not 
a good example to illustrate the case of "too little and too 
late" in advance publicity, but other examples abound. 
Neither exhibitors nor the public are being conditioned 
sufficiently to generate the proper enthusiasm for many 
worthwhile pictures. 

O 

CINERAMA ON THE BALL. Alert showmanship is 
credited with giving the current Cinerama attraction, 
"Seven Wonders of the World" a shot in the arm. New 
ads have appeared pushing the Middle East sequence. 
"Cinerama Plunges You into the Flaming Middle East!" 
screams the catchline. "You'll follow the super-tanks 
through the battle-scarred Suez Canal . . . You'll ride with 
the camel caravans along the oil pipelines of Arabia . . . 
You'll walk the green fields wrested from the blazing 
desert by the indomitable Israelis . . . etc." The Warner 
Theatre in New York reported a lively increase in ticket 
sales. 

0 

TV SET PRODUCTION. Television set manufacturers 
are beset by a serious problem: overproduction in a di- 
minishing market. In the month of January more than 25 
percent of the sets produced were not sold and stocks are 
backing up on the shelves of every manufacturer and dis- 
tributor. Only portable sets seem to be finding a market, 
while color is not moving at all. The dire situation is high- 
lighted by Emerson's financial report, which showed 1956 
earnings down to 4 cents a share, compared to $1.26 the 
year before. RCA is also expected to show a sharp drop in 
its next fiscal statement. 

0 

REBELLION. Among the Academy Award candidates 
regarded as being sure shots for high standing in the bal- 
loting are "Baby Doll" and Ingrid Bergman ("Anastasia"). 
Hollywood observers say that a considerable portion of the 
support for these two candidates springs from the attitude 
of many film workers about censorship and blackballing on 
moral grounds. It represents, they say, a rebellion against 
the Catholic Church ban on "Baby Doll" and the denunci- 
ation of Miss Bergman following her divorce and marriage 
to Rossellini. If the picture and star should win the Os- 
cars, credit some of the votes to this subconscious defiance 
of the moralists. 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 5 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 

JACK L. WARNER made some sweet 
music for WB stockholders and for the 
industry at large when he revealed (1) a 
net profit of $1,569,000 for the three 
months ended Dec. 1, 1956, and (2) plans 
to invest $85 million in 35 pictures as evi- 
dence of his company's "confidence in the 
future of theatrical motion picture exhi- 
bition". The financial statement disclosed 
to shareholders at the annual meeting 
showed income from film rentals and 
sales for the three month period amount- 
ing to $20,718,000, with the net of $1,569,- 
000 being equal to 85c per share. This 
compares with the following figures for 
the corresponding quarter of the previous 
year: $19,132,000 gross income, a net 
profit of $927,000, equal to 37c per share. 
In announcing the $85 million outlay for 
new product, Warner declared: "The ex- 
ceptional boxoffice performance" of such 
films as "Moby Dick", "Bad Seed" and 
"Giant" have been an "inspiration". He 
said the "vast attendance" at these and 
other company's product is "proof that 
the public is prepared to give unqualified 
support to all worthwhile motion picture 
entertainment". Documenting his claim 
that WB can boast of one of the most im- 
pressive programs in its history, Warner 
cited, among pictures currently in various 
stages of production: "No Time for Ser- 
geants", starring Andy Griffith; "Sayona- 
ra", with Marlon Brando; Hemingway's 
"The Old Man and the Sea", with Spen- 
cer Tracy; Elia Kazan's "A Face in the 
Crowd"; "The Prince and the Showgirl", 
starring Marilyn Monroe and Laurence 
Olivier, and "The Story of Mankind". 




Among Warner Brothers'' important 1957 
product: Upper left: Spencer Tracy and Ern- 
est Hemingway, star and author of "The Old 
Man and The Sea': r.: Hedy Lamarr as Joan 
of Arc in "The Story of Mankind": lower I.: 
Laurence Olivier and Marilyn Monroe as "The 
Prince and The Showgirl"; lower r.: Mel 
Ferrer and Ingrid Bergman in "Paris Does 
Strange Things". 




GORDON 



JULIUS M. GORDON, elected to suc- 
ceed Ruben Shor as president of National 
Allied, declared he would "go to any 
length, at any time, with any group, to 
meet and discuss" industry problems, 
calling for a "meeting of the minds" to 
bring about a solution to such problems. 
Gordon, Beaumont, Texas, theatreowner, 
and former Allied secretary, was selected 
for his new post at the Allied board meet- 
ing which followed the organization's 
recent drive-in convention in Cincinnati. 
His selection was the highlight of events 
at the two meetings which saw the Allied 
board take the following actions: autho- 
rize its COMPO committee, consisting of 
Trueman Rembusch, Ruben Shor and 
general counsel Abram Myers, to con- 
tinue discussions on the possibility of Al- 
lied rejoining the all-industry organiza- 
tion; pass resolutions (1) alerting all 
members to guard against present or 
future state or city taxes; (2) condemn 
any further mergers of corporate interests 
of film producers and distributors (re- 
portedly based on the recent RKO-U-I 
deal), directing Allied officers to bring 
the "danger" posed by such moves to the 
attention of "public bodies" having juris- 
diction over mergers and appropriate 
committees of Congress; (3) thank 20th- 
Fox sales topper Alex Harrison for his 
proposed aid to small theatres and offer- 
ing Allied's full cooperation in Fox's plans 
for rehabilitating small-town and subse- 
quent-run theatres. The board agreed to 
participate in an all-out campaign for the 
complete elimination of the admission 
tax, endorsing Sen. Fulbright's bill which 
would reduce corporate taxes on the first 
$25,000 of profit. During the convention, 
former president Shor sent a letter to all 
production company heads requesting a 
meeting with exhibitor leaders with a 
view to negotiating an arbitration system, 
based on the recommendations made by 
the Senate Small Business Committee re- 
ports. Allied's arbitration committee 
would consist of Shor, Myers and Abe 
Berenson. Myers was re-elected board 
chairman and general counsel, Horace 
Adams of Cleveland, treasurer, and Ed- 
ward Lider of Boston, secretary. 




ROGERS 



BUDD ROGERS, prominent independent 
film distributor, has acquired for national 
distribution a number of RKO reissues, it 
was disclosed last week. While neither 
the total number, nor the titles, of the 
pictures involved in the deal were re- 
vealed, it was generally assumed that the 
number ranged between 15 and 20. Other 
post-1948 RKO features might be added 
if the plan works out successfully. RKO 
president Daniel T. O'Shea announced 
that 21 independent regional exchanges 
will handle release of the product. Oper- 
ations will be supervised by RKO world- 
wide sales head Walter Branson and 
RKO sales executives Nat Levy and Her- 
bert Greenblatt. Promotion will be in the 
hands of RKO department heads: Ben 
Grimm, advertising, Dave Cantor, exploi- 
tation, and Al Stern, publicity. Budd 
Rogers until recently headed Realart Pic- 
tures, which handled the redistribution of 
ten years of old Universal product, also 
via states rights distributors. 

0 

ERNEST G. STELLINGS, TOA presi- 
dent, told a press conference that an 
orderly release of good pictures thus far 
in 1957 had started the year "off on the 
right foot" and that he hoped this "en- 
lightened policy" of the film companies 
will continue. "There is no problem in 
this industry that more good pictures 
can't solve", Stellings said. He also re- 
ported that talks with distribution offi- 
cials had brought assurances that they 
will do "everything in their power to co- 
operate with the small town theatre own- 
ers to assist in keeping their theatres 
open, even to the point of considerable as- 
sistance in the area of film-rental terms 
and deals". The TOA leader further re- 
vealed that he has asked the distribution 
companies to meet with representatives 
of TOA and other exhibitor groups with 
a view to establishing an industry system 
of arbitration. In anticipation of such 
meetings, he announced the appointment 
of TOA's arbitration committee: Mitchell 
Wolfson, S. H. Fabian, Samuel Pinanski, 
Herman Levy and Stellings. George Ros- 
coe of Charlotte, N. C, was named TOA 
field representative. 



P«9« e Film BULLETIN February 18. 1957 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




SCHLAIFER 



L. J. (JACK) SCHLAIFER, formerly 
special sales representative for United Ar- 
tists, has been appointed assistant to UA 
sales head James R. Velde. Assignment 
to the newly-created post marks Schlai- 
fer's return to UA where he has held a 
number of key positions since 1928. For 
the past two years, Schlaifer has been as- 
sociated with independent producer 
George Schaefer. 

0 

MOTION PICTURE ASSOCIATION 
will attempt to find out why people do 
and do not go to the movies. Answers to 
these and other attendance problems will 
be sought in a nation-wide study to be 
conducted by the Opinion Research Corp. 
of Princeton, N. J. Aim will be a "com- 
prehensive study of the motion picture 
market and the significant elements which 
affect that market". The survey will cover 
the frequency of attendance of moviegoers 
divided up by age groups, income, loca- 
tion, etc. It will try to determine what 
serious competition the movies face in 
other uses of leisure time. Availability of 
films in a given area, seasonal factors, 
speed of playoff and opportunities for in- 
creasing attendance also will be studied. 

o 

ELMER C. RHODEN attributed the 
"greater popular appeal of current films" 
among the reasons for National Theatres' 
excellent report for the quarterly period 
ending Dec. 25, 1956. Net income of the 
company and subsidiaries amounted to 
$572,913, or 21 cents per share as com- 
pared with $203,053—7 cents per share— 
for the corresponding quarter. This rise 
is noteworthy, Rhoden declared, because 
theatres faced "the full impact of the re- 
lease of major film companies' hit pictures 
to television". 




PEPPERCORN 



CARL PEPPERCORN, industry sales 
veteran, was named vice president in 
charge of sales of Continental Distribut- 
ing, a subsidiary of Walter Reade Thea- 
tres. Announcement was made by Conti- 
nental president Frank Kassler and board 
chairman Walter Reade, Jr. 

0 

PHILIP F. HARLING. Fabian Theatres 
executive, has been appointed co-chair- 
man of TOA's Joint Committee on Toll 
TV, replacing the late Alfred Starr. Had- 
ing has served the committee as secre- 
tary-treasurer since it was formed. He is 
assistant treasurer of TOA and a director 
of the Metropolitan Theatres Ass'n. True- 
man Rembusch of Allied is the other co- 
chairman of the Anti-Toll-TV group. 

o 

STEVE BROIDY gave Allied Artists' 
stockholders a red-inked financial report 
for the 26-week period ending Dec. 29, 
1956. Though gross income was up from 
the corresponding period — $8,662,686 this 
year compared with $8,160,763 last year — 
net loss amounted to $452,000 compared 
to a net profit of $183,708 of the com- 
parable period. Not included in the re- 
port by the AA president were receipts 
on "Friendly Persuasion" which, he 
stated, is "tentatively being amortized on 
a cost recovery basis". 




WB BUY FBI STORY" 

Jack I., limner and FBI topper J. Edgar 
Hoover shah' over the purchase by Warner 
Brothers of film rights to "The FBI Story", 
best-seller by ace journalist Don Whitehead. 



HEADLINERS... 



FRANK H. RICKETSON. JR., Nation- 
al Theatres g. mgr., serves as exhibitor 
chairman of National Brotherhood week, 
Feb. 17-24. His co-chairmen: SHER- 
RILL C. CORWIN, WILLIAM FOR- 
MAN, EVERT R. CUMMINGS... 
DAVID GOLDING, advertising & pub- 
licity v. p. of Hecht, Hill & Lancaster, a 
recent New York visitor for discussions 
with UA home office execs on upcoming 
"The Bachelor Party" . . . UA's San 
Francisco, New Orleans and St. John 
branches winners of 2nd lap of Jim Velde 
Sales Drive, according to co-captains 
WILLIAM J. HEINEM AN & MAX E. 
YOUNGSTEIN... Variety Club Inter- 
antional Convention scheduled for April 
3-6 in New Orleans . . . Convention of 
Texas Drive-In Theatre Owners Assn. set 
for Feb. 25-27 in Dallas, president 
EDDIE JOSEPH presiding ... DAR- 
RYL F. ZANUCK elected a member of 




Allied of III. pres. Jack Kirsrh. r.. retiring 
chief barker of III. Variety Club Tent 26. 
greets new pres. Lou Reinheimer. 

the board of directors, 20th Century-Fox, 
and a member of the company's finance 
committee. Former Fox studio chief is 
now independent producer with that com- 
pany ... $75,000 is goal set by SAMUEL 
RINZLER, exhibitor chairman of indus- 
try's Brotherhood Drive for New York 
area... MARK STONE appointed to 
new post of business manager for War- 
ner Bros, advertising and publicity depts. 
by vice president ROBERT S. TAPLIN- 
GER . . . JOHN SPRINGER named na- 
tional magazine contact at 20th-Fox . . . 
ROBERT BOEHNEL, member of 
RKO's publicity dept. for 18 years, now 
at work on special exploitation unit for 
Warners' "Spirit of St. Louis", headed by 
HERBERT PICKMAN ... United Ar- 
tists vice president ARNOLD M. PICK- 




German star 0. W. Fischer. L, meets June 
Allyson, U-I bd. chairman X. J. Blumberg & 
U-I production head Ed. Muhl. Stars will 
make "My Man Godfrey". 

ER currently touring company offices in 
the Far East to discuss promotional and 
distribution plans . . . Former Columbia 
production head JERRY WALD at work 
on first picture for Fox, "Love Affair" 
. . . March 24-May 4 designated "Spyros 
P. Skouras 15th Anniversary Celebra- 
tion". Fox division managers C. GLENN 
NORRIS, MARTIN MOSKOWITZ, 
HERMAN WOBBER & HARRY G. 
BALLANCE will supervise testimonial 
program . . . SAM ROTH, retiring after 
30 years as manager of Stanley Warner's 
Baker Theatre in Dover, N. J., honored at 
dinner given by S-W Newark zone home 
office . . . National Film Service will phy- 
sically handle all films produced or re- 
leased by Artists-Producers Associates 
according to A-P president A. W. SCH- 
WALBERG and NFS president JAMES 
P. CLARK. 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 7 



PATTERNS OF PATRDNAIil! 
in 



CxctuMt $L BULLETIN feature 



Bringin g Ba c k The W omen 




By LEONARD SPINRAD 
In the lush years when more than 80,000,000 tickets to 
the movies were sold each week in the United States, it 
was commonly accepted that more women than men were 
customers. A so-called woman's picture was considered a 
pretty safe investment. It was also axiomatic that when a 
couple went to the movies the lady did the choosing. 

There were more men than women in the United States 
at that time. Today the ladies outnumber the gents, par- 
ticularly between the ages of 18 and 64. In the ordinary 
course of events, therefore, the predominance of distaff 
patrons should now be greater than ever in the average 
movie audience. 

Something has happened to female moviegoing, how- 
ever. As motion picture attendance has been declining 
from its onetime peak, the proportion of women in the 
audience has been plummeting even more. The ratio of 
men to women watching theatre motion pictures is cur- 
rently estimated at 60-40. 

If this proportion had been registered at a time when 
motion picture theatres were all playing to capacity, it 
would be little cause for concern; but at a time when the 
national audience is smaller than it should be, the disen- 
chantment of our former favorite patrons is a serious 
matter indeed. 

Now there may be profound sociological and psycho- 
logical implications in the decline of the female moviegoer. 
Such implications are not within our immediate ken. If 
mama no longer picks the pictures for papa, that is papa's 
triumph, not ours. If ladies are staying home more than 
they used to, let the sociologists do the interpreting. But, 
by the same token, let's not regard our female patronage 



problem as something we had no part in making. It didn't 
jusc happen. 

The unpredictability of the human female is a standing 
gag for the wits of the airwaves and the comic strips; but 
observers of the potential female moviegoer have been 
compiling a pretty high batting average with their pre- 
dictions. 

Mrs. M. Henry Dawson deals with women's groups on 
behalf of the Motion Picture Association of America. As 
far back as 1950, Marjorie Dawson was advising the vari- 
ous companies to pay more attention to feminine tastes in 
their advertising. In their zeal to attract more male pa- 
trons, they sometimes were taking sales angles that not 
only didn't appeal to the ladies, but even antagonized them. 
She cited a picture with a "Captains Courageous" type of 
plot, about a little rich boy tenderfoot in the West whose 
story she felt had a strong attraction for women; but the 
potentially large feminine audience never knew it was this 
kind of picture, because it was sold as a straight western. 



WHAT KIND OF ADS SELL WOMEN? 



Other advisers have matched Mrs. Dawson's comments 
about the effect of some movie advertising on the female 
audience. The rough, tough aura given to various pictures 
in their ads has been regarded as a minus factor for the 
ladies. The emphasis in pseudo-science or on the sexy 
"other woman" has been no come-hither for the skirted 
contingent. 

Bear in mind, at this point, that the dicta mentioned 
here do not criticize the content of the pictures (a matter 
dealt with later in our discussion). We are talking here 
and now about the sales pitch. And we are not discussing 
the accuracy of the advertising in relation to the picture it 
advertises. The question is merely one of editorial judg- 
ment as to what portion of the picture is the most sales- 
worthy. 

Male and female tastes continue to differ. It is therefore 
necessary for the motion picture company to find common 
denominators or attack each half of the split market sepa- 
rately. Let us consider first the split market approach. 

The vendors of automobiles utilize two approaches in 

(Continued on Page 10 J 



Film BULLETIN February 18. 1957 Page 9 



BRINGING BACK THE WUMEN 

4 ondil i o#i oi Theatre* Picture* Adv M g Are AH Factors 



(Continued from Pane 9) 

their advertising. To the ladies, they are apt to present a 
picture of how much prestige, comfort and family fun their 
autos will bring. For the males, they lean more to the idea 
that a new car is a mechanical marvel of captive power. 
This obviously is a split market approach, selling one prod- 
uct with two different spiels to two different people. 

It is only within the very recent past that the motion 
picture advertisers have become at all adjusted to this dual 
sell. All along, of course, there have been female-oriented 
ads especially designed for the fan magazines. But these 
have been aimed at the female fan, not the female general- 
ly. There has been relatively little ladies' advertising in 
the newspapers or on television; instead the men's ads 
have dominated these media. There seems to have been an 
impression in some movie advertising circles that women 
only read women's magazines, but men read everything. 

There also seems to be an impression that general wom- 
en's magazines are to be judged by the same penetration 
standards as a picture weekly or a Sunday supplement, al- 
though feminine periodicals are generally committed to a 
service concept far beyond that of mixed publications. 

But even where brilliant advertising has taken full ad- 
vantage of all the media and all the special angles on be- 
half of a movie — and this happens more often than an out- 
sider might suppose — there are other obstacles in the path 
of consistently strong feminine patronage for the motion 
picture theatre. 

One such obstacle is apt to be the theatre itself. Dilapi- 
dated houses don't attract anybody; but even a modern, 
well-built theatre can discourage feminine patronage if the 
seats and the floor are not kept clean, or the occasional 




hoodlum is not dealt with promptly and vigorously. A 
dirty rest room can be more disastrous than a bad picture. 
These are factors which must not be ignored in consider- 
ing the movies' appeal to the ladies. 

The right kind of movies for women today, in the opinion 
of observers of distaff tastes, are not what the motion pic- 
ture business is so accustomed to regard as the classic 
"women's pictures," offerings such as "Stella Dallas" or 
"Madame X." Men are not the only ones today who want 
more meat in their entertainment. Emotion without corn 
is the formula proposed by one lady industryite. 



It is obviously difficult to pinpoint the kind of subject 
matter that fills the bill ; producers maintain story depart- 
ments to glean a handful of suitable properties from the 
annual mountain of material and we offer no easy substi- 
tute for this effort. But a helpful guide to female tastes 
can be found in the stars women like. 

Women used to be the most loyal of movie fans for the 
particular stars they favored. Except for the phenomenon 
of Elvis Presley, which is something else again, the wom- 
en's stars are not on the horizon. 

Who are women's stars? Despite what the industry 
seems to think, women's long-term favorite stars are not 
the matinee idols. The women's stars are likely to be 
women themselves. 

Joan Crawford has been a woman's star, ever since she 
began playing well groomed, well clothed, well spoken but 
terribly harassed females on the screen. Jane Wyman in 
her more recent stardom has had the same feminine fol- 
lowing. It was also true of Loretta Young and Deborah 
Kerr has had it too. 



TOO FEW FEMALE STARS 



This is not to minimize the female appeal of the Rock 
Hudsons and Marlon Brandos, by any means. But the fact 
is that in the past ten years, during the period when men 
have become the majority audience, almost three times 
more male stars than female luminaries have come upon 
the Hollywood scene. The women in the audiences have 
less stellar women on the screen to be loyal to. 

Slightly more than a year ago, the author of this article 
made an exhaustive research study for a leading motion 
picture company to find some sort of pattern among the 
actors and actresses who had become movie stars in the 
decade to 1955. This investigation covered only movie 
stars, not stars from television or the stage who came to 
the movies with prefabricated top billing. 

Sex appeal was the prime attribute of only one out of six 
of the feminine stars. Far more important was the impact 
of strong, recognizable personalities. Grace Kelly, if she 
had to be characterized with a single adjective, would un- 
doubtedly be termed ladylike, even though some of her 
movie roles were as full of sex as anybody else's. Doris 
Day and Audrey Hepburn would not be termed sexy above 
everything else either, even though they have both scored 
notable successes. And of late Marilyn Monroe has come 
to be accepted as an adept portrayer of hapless females, 
rather than of just exaggerated sexy dames. 

There is no doubt that a sexy girl like Jayne Mansfield 
or Anita Ekberg has certain strong advantages in the pur- 
suit of movie stardom. Her picture appears to full advan- 
tage in the newspapers; she becomes recognizable to the 
public, male and female. Males with an appreciation of the 
female form are not too hard to entice inside the theatre to 
see her films. 

But, judging by past performance, this only brings her 



Page 10 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



BRINGING BACK THE WOMEN 



Thvy I suttlltj i t> ut ii> I Family's ?#oi vie-going 



to the fundamental challenge of her motion picture career. 
She must now become something more than just a sex 
votary. She must become a reasonable personality, accept- 
able to both men and women. She can be the public's 
epitome of glamor in clothes and manner, or the image of 
the problems that trouble the average woman, or every- 
body's (women's as well as men's) pure little darling; but 
she must be reasonably acceptable to women. 

Most of our concern about the declining feminine attend- 
ance at the movies, a decrease of some 63% in women's 
patronage since 1940 according to one reliable estimate, is 
based on the entirely too conservative theory that each 
woman represents only one admission ticket at a time. On 
such a basis the decline is bad enough; but how much 
worse it appears when we take into account the influence 
of a woman upon the sale of tickets to other members of 
her family. 

When women stop going to the movies, their young chil- 
dren are apt to stop, or at least to cut down their movie- 
goings, too. When women are disinterested in attending 
the local motion picture theatre, their husbands find vari- 
ous other forms of family evening relaxation for them. 

This does not imply a matriarchy or a hen-pecked pub- 
lic. Men have the same sort of influence, in varying de- 
gree, on their families and on their womenfolk. Neither 
sex, nor any age group, lives in a vacuum. 

So the continuing weakness of feminine attendance at 
the movies becomes an important factor for the future. 
Ways must be found to tear down the wall that is shutting 




out the feminine audience. If 99 out of 100 pictures fail to 
attract Mrs. X, she soon begins to feel that the movies gen- 
erally are not for her any more. On the other hand, if she 
is interested in seeing this week's picture, and next week's 
and the week after that, she is likely to retain her desire to 
go to the theatre regularly thereafter. 

The greatest crop of children in the history of our nation 
is being introduced to modern American life by fond 
mothers these days. It is of course to be hoped that thea- 
tre motion pictures will be among the items passed on to 
the youngsters by their parents. But the parents will, at 
best, only reflect their own interest. 

Perhaps it should be emphasized that women come in 
the usual variety of shapes, colors, likes and dislikes. There 
never was a picture made which appealed to all women, 
any more than there ever was a woman who appealed to all 
men. But most women, whatever their particular dispo- 



sitions and opinions, are inclined to share certain primal 
emotions. 

This is usually truer of what human beings don't like 
than of what they do like. A film lady, for instance, in dis- 
cussing the comparative attitudes of the two genders, com- 
mented that "In the movies men like sex, but women like 
romance." There is certainly a very real difference. And 
it is this difference which must be bridged with a common 
— or perhaps uncommon — denominator. 

We have looked at the split market approach in adver- 
tising, where it can be very effective. In the actual content 
of the motion pictures, however, it is much wiser com- 
mercially these days to seek to please both men and wom- 
en than to rely on appeal for one sex alone. Hence the 
denominator. 



BIG GROSSERS HAVE SEX APPEAL 



Look at the big grossers of all time — "Gone With the 
wind," "The Robe," "The Greatest Show on Earth," "From 
Here to Eternity." There was sex appeal in each of them, 
but there was also a good deal more to the story. 

"The King and I" was basically a woman's picture, but 
its setting and bizarre male lead were also carefully 
oriented so that the male public would not feel left out. 
This wasn't just a matter of publicizing the beauty of the 
king's harem ; it involved making sure that the male part 
was not subordinated and that the male audience had a 
pretty good idea beforehand as to what was going to be 
seen. The movie companies never forget the men. 

Perhaps the most recent testimonial to the male orienta- 
tion has been the stepped up pace of production of program 
pictures — the action dramas, melodramas and westerns 
which find their patronage mainly among men. Made on 
small budgets, these pictures show a profit often enough 
to encourage more of the same kind of film fare. But mean- 
while the ladies do something else instead of going to the 
movies. And it isn't only the second features which pass 
our ladies by. 

One of the headaches visited upon the merchandisers of 
motion pictures is the decision, made after a man's film is 
completed, that something must now be done to sell the 
picture to women. The trouble here is that when the selling 
succeeds women are inclined to feel they have been misled. 
You can't sell a masculine picture on the basis of one scene 
of feminine interest, and then expect the women to be 
happy when the film turns out to be entirely different than 
what they expected. There may be box office success for 
one film under such circumstances, but it just makes the 
selling job harder the next time you have something for 
the ladies. 

We have long since agreed in this country that women 
are people. It now remains for the motion picture industry 
to exploit the other side of the coin and take advantage of 
the fact that people in the United States, more often than 
not, are women. 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 11 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 

FEBRUARY 18, 1957 

By Philip R. Ward 



ONE-MAN (CORPORATE) GANGS. In a very real 
sense, many of Hollywood's corporate entities are not cor- 
porations at all. They fall short of the corporate definition 
in spirit, structure and overall organizational purpose. 
When internal revenue comes calling, however, they be- 
come quite smartly and properly corporate. 

What these unique business organisms really amount to 
are one man proprietorships striking a corporate pose. And 
since play-acting is called for, it is quite in order that those 
who use the ruse most widely are themselves play-actors. 
Performers who once regarded a sinking fund as some- 
thing cast off a Spanish galleon nowadays discourse learn- 
edly on limited liability and preside over directors' meet- 
ings with all the aplomb of a Benjamin Fairless. 

This plunge into the high seas of commerce began a 
mere two years ago when a revision in the tax code gave a 
few bright accountants the notion that their artistic clients 
might prosper prodigously in doing a solo in entrepreneur- 
ship. "Incorporate yourself," screamed the crafty CPAs 
to the $100,000-and-upward clients. "Dumbkopf, why deny 
yourself the better things in life? You pay 91%. Why not 
become a boss and pay 40%, 45%, 52% tops!" 

There was no compromising this logic. There is quite a 
gap in the take-home swag between a potential personal 
income tax of 91% and the corporate ceiling of 52%. With 
the seeds of uprising thus planted, many of Hollywood's 
best paid bondsmen shucked off the yoke of their capitalis- 
tic oppressors, the major film companies, and went into 
business for themselves. As in most fairy tales there were 
soon bountiful blessings for all — CPAs not excepted. 

0 

It is now two years later, and enter the villian, a tax code 
analyst employed by the Department of Treasury, earning, 
perhaps, $5,700 a year. He is a bright boy, too. From his 
seat of detachment far from the jumbled economics of film- 
dom employment, the aroma of the one-man corporation 
smells like a tax dodge. His superiors agree. A tentative 
ruling is handed down. Self-incorporation is an evasion 
and income from such operations shall be subject to in- 
dividual income taxation. What is more, collections shall 
be retroactive to the time of incorporation. 

An angry yelp has gone up from corporate-proprietors 
in all phases of amusement. The Treasury Department is 
now studying the appeals and conferring on a final decree. 
The odds say it will give the one-man venture the back of 
its hand. Hollywood's glamourpusses can play the cor- 
poration bit to their hearts content, but they'll be taxed as 
individuals. The retroactive feature may be quashed, how- 
ever, for it is unjustly confiscatory and could put many a 
personality in hock up to his gullet. 



The entire issue has been one of tax code interpretation. 
The code was not specific. The CPAs simply misinter- 
preted. 

0 

As for sympathy, practitioners of the one-man set-up will 
get little from outside their industry. Typical of sentiment 
on this subject is the comment of Donald L. Rogers, finan- 
cial editor of the New York Herald Tribune : "In fairness, 
it is hard to see why there should be any group of indi- 
viduals in America receiving special tax consideration. 
Even paying the big slice in taxes required of a non-incor- 
porated individual, most stars would be able to live better 
and save more than most other Americans. 

"Carried to an extreme, there is no reason why Harlow 
Curtice couldn't incorporate and let the Harlow Curtice 
Corp. contract his services as president of General Motors. 
He'd save a great deal of money that way." 

It is unbecoming for Mr. Rogers to cite Harlow Curtice 
in his illustration. This corner is no champion of the solo 
corporate shop, but fair play demands a rebuttal on one or 
two points. 

In the first place Mr. Curtice's talents can command a 
relatively stable price year in year out barring physical or 
mental impairment. Advancing age is his sole problem. 
Mr. Curtice's face, voice or comportment is not subject to 
the whims, fashions and modes of a fickle marketplace. 
Perhaps his automobiles are, but not Mr. Curtice. The 
GM President may retool, restyle his line and bring a new 
look to his cars. John Wayne remains John Wayne, for 
better or worse. Many big corporation executives are still 
high-salaried at age 60; few stars are. 

Nor let it be said movie artists are not deserving of 
special consideration. Producers of natural resources take 
liberal depletion allowances. Industry at large writes off 
depreciation. The theory behind these benefits is to com- 
pensate a firm for the decline in its assets. The government 
refuses to view the unique talents (or personalities) of ar- 
tists as depreciable items. It seems to say by its position 
that the human factor is more endurable than the machine. 
This may be true in some industries, but not in entertain- 
ment. Personalities, at best, enjoy a limited saleability. 
They should be allowed to make hay in the few years in 
which their wares can command a price. 

But overriding every other aspect is the fact that one- 
man corporations, regardless of the motives behind them, 
are still risk-taking ventures. Losses may be taken as well 
as profits. This is not true of ordinary employment. On 
this count alone, Hollywood's corporate-proprietors rate 
a break. 



Page 12 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



Movies Topping TV -Value Line 



THEATRES NDT HURT 

BY HOME SHOWINGS 

OF OLD FEATURES 
■ 

TEXT OF VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 

A larger supply of quality pictures has initiated an en- 
couraging uptrend in movie attendance. This has taken 
place despite increasing releases of old films to television. 
Prospects for the new year are bright. Still more promis- 
ing features will be forthcoming. Recent elimination of 
the 10% excise tax on some admissions is expected to pro- 
vide a further boost to industry revenues. Earnings of 
many movie companies will also be augmented by income 
from new sources ... In most cases, the current better- 
than-average dividends seem well protected ; a few may 
even be increased. Undervalued relative to this year's 
earnings and dividends, many movie stocks offer interest- 
ing 3- to 5-year appreciation potentiality as well. 

The motion picture industry's 1956 experience may be 
regarded as both disappointing and encouraging. Disap- 
pointing because despite earlier high hopes, earnings of 
most movie companies turned out relatively poor during 
most of the year. For the most part, however, these un- 
satisfactory results deflected reduced boxoffice receipts in 
the first half. Although major studios released nearly 10% 
more feature films in 1956, the bulk of them were not dis- 
tributed until after mid-year. This shortage of products, 
coupled with poor weather conditions in the greater part of 
the nation during the important weeks immediately before 
Easter, sent theatre attendance down to a new low. Since 
many of the motion picture companies closed their 1956 
fiscal years on September 30th or earlier, they could not 
avoid showing reduced operating profits in their annual 
reports. 

While many observers, looking at the dismal results of 
the first half, were ready to prophesy the doom of Holly- 
wood, signs of encouragement began to appear by mid- 
year. In response to a healthier flow of quality pictures 
from producers, theatre admissions started a rapid uptrend. 
So persistent was the ascent that by the end of July, week- 
ly attendance reached the highest level in 10 years. Since 
then, it has generally continued to show favorable year-to- 
year comparisons. Pres. S. H. Fabian of Stanley Warner 
recently disclosed that box-office receipts from that com- 
pany's theatre circuit in the week ended January 5th were 
the highest for any one week in the company's history. 



"Prospects for the new year are bright", according 
to most recent Value Line analysis of the motion pic- 
ture industry. "Several favorable factors combine to 
suggest that a significant recovery in profits is more 
than mere wishful thinking", declares the investment 
survey sheet published by Arnold Bernhard & Co. 
These include stepped-up studio output, elimination of 
the admissions tax up to 91c, augmented studio reve- 
nue from television, and the sale or conversion by ma- 
jor theatre companies of unproductive properties. 
Further, the survey finds that the increasing number of 
pre- 1 948 films on TV have not curtailed theatre at- 
tendance, as expected. Rather, "it is the major tele- 
vision broadcasting networks that have been adverse- 
ly affected". In fact, says Value Line, "it appears that 
Hollywood has been gaining an upper hand" in its 
fight with TV. Two economic factors are seen favor- 
able to the movie future: ( I ) America will have more 
time and money for entertainment, and (2) the indus- 
try's important customer group, the 15- to 24-year- 
olds, will increase. But, warns V-L in conclusion: "The 
fortunes of the motion picture industry will continue to 
depend on the quality of its products and the ability 
of its publicity agents to whet the public's appetite". 




Likewise, a survey conducted by Twentieth Century-Fox 
indicated that during the first few weeks of this year, thea- 
tre attendance was some 20% higher than the year earlier 
level. 

TV Movies vs. Theatres 

It is interesting to note that the upsurge in theatre at- 
tendance has taken place at a time when an increasing 
number of pre-1948 feature films are being released 
through television. For many years, exhibitors had feared 
(and some still do) that licensing of old movies for tele- 
casting would deal a devastating blow to the theatre busi- 
ness. Film producers therefore refrained from using tele- 
vision as an outlet for their products. But after RKO Pic- 
cures sold its library to a television film distributor in 1955 
and Warner Bros, released its pre-1948 features early last 
year, the flood-gate was thrown open. By Fall, it was esti- 
mated that an average television set in the U. S. was pre- 
senting as much as 20 hours of old movies a week on its 
screen. Strangely enough, the movie theatres have not 
been hurt by the showing of Hollywood films on TV. 
Rather, it is the major television broadcasting networks 

(Continued on Page 14 J 



Film BULLETIN February 18. 1957 Page 13 



VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 

!#«#•«' Protlurt. Tax Cuts To Boost industry's SSt>rt>mn> 



(Continued from Page 13) 

that have been adversely affected. From city to city, net- 
work-affiliated stations have been losing a portion of their 
audience to competing stations telecasting the old Holly- 
wood flickers. Indeed, with most Hollywood studios also 
taking over the production of filmed series especially 
tailored for TV, many industry observers now suspect that 
the television industry is finally submitting to Hollywood. 
(Speaking at a meeting of NBC affiliates, Chairman David 
Sarnoff of Radio Corp. recently listed the torrent of films 
pouring into the television industry from Hollywood as 
one of the major problems of the broadcasting networks.) 

Improvements in Profits Likely 

In sharp contrast to the general economy, which appears 
to be gradually weakening, the motion picture industry, we 
believe, will enjoy a more prosperous year in 1957. Several 
favorable factors combine to suggest that a significant re- 
covery in profits is more than mere wishful thinking: 

(1) Apparently hearkening to the warm box-office recep- 
tion accorded to their recent releases and believing that 
their new productions will eventually generate additional 
income from television, most studios are planning to step 
up their output considerably this year. To be sure, War- 
ner Bros, and at least two smaller producers are expected 
to release fewer pictures in 1957 because for various in- 
ternal reasons their production activities were greatly cur- 
tailed last year. But the decline in their output is expected 
to be far more than offset by the substantial increases 
scheduled by other major producers as well as the inde- 
pendents. For example, Twentieth Century-Fox recently 
announced that during the first 6 months of 1957, it would 
release at least 26 attractions. This would represent the 
largest 6-month product lineup in over 10 years. In the 
entire year of 1956, the company turned out only 32 fea- 
tures. If the recent favorable trend in theatre attendance 
is any indication that the American public is gradually re- 
acquiring the theatre-going habit, this indicated larger 
flow of quality productions from Hollywood will probably 
be translated into higher box office recepits. 

(2) Even without any gain in theatre attendance, indus- 
try revenues would be expected to show an important ex- 
pansion due to a recent change in the federal tax law. Be- 
ginning last Sept. 1st, all theatre admissions under 91c 
have been exempted from the 10% federal excise tax. Pre- 
viously, only those admissions TOc or under had been tax- 
free. In passing the tax relief bill, it was the intention of 
the Congress to aid the motion picture industry; hence, 
virtually all theatres have been retaining the tax savings. 
A large number of theatres in this country had been charg- 
ing admissions ranging from 51c to 90c. If everything else 
remains unchanged, therefore, their box-office receipts will 
be given a 10% boost without any corresponding increase 
in operating expenses. This additional pre-tax income is 
being shared by both the exhibitors and the producers. 

(3) The revenues of most major studios will be aug- 
mented by income from television. This new source of in- 



come may be divided into two general types. The first in- 
cludes revenues derived from the production of special 
filmed series for TV broadcasting. For many years, Co- 
lumbia Pictures, through its subsidiary Screen Gems, has 
found considerable success in this venture. With demand 
for such products mounting rapidly, other studios are step- 
ping up their activities in this field. Warner Bros., for ex- 
ample, recently launched a $600,000 project to build new 
facilities especially designed for TV film production. And 
only a few weeks ago, Loew's announced the formation of 
a new division, MGM-TV, for the same purpose. Since 
negotiations are usually made with TV stations for the 
ultimate release of these pictures long before their shoot- 
ing, investments here involve relatively smaller risk than 
that entailed by production of films for theatres, and a 
satisfactory return is generally guaranteed. 

The second type of income from television comes from 
the leasing of telecasting rights to old features, mostly 
those produced before August 1948. These revenues are 
particularly lucrative because against them no production 
costs have to be charged. All of the films involved have 
been completely amortized on the company's books. In 
most instances, therefore, by far the greater part of the 
rental income can be carried through to pre-tax earnings. 
This income is not non-recurrent. So far, of the major pro- 
ducers reviewed herein, only Warner Bros, has sold its pre- 
1948 library outright, realizing a one-time capital gain. 
Other studios, however, are making their old products 
available to TV on a piecemeal basis, so that revenues 
from this source will be forthcoming for many years. 
(Paramount Pictures and Universal, 87% owned by Decca 
Records, have not yet announced any plans with regard to 
the disposition of their libraries ; however, some arrange- 
ments along the same line will probably be made before 
long.) 

(4) The exhibitors have an ace in the hole too. All 3 of 
the major theatre companies own substantial real estate 
properties that are either unproductive or operating un- 
profitably. These hidden values are being systematically 
realized through sale or conversion into productive assets. 
Where they have been converted into parking lots, super- 
markets, or many other uses, their earning power has in- 
variably been enhanced. When they are sold, substantial 
cash and, in many cases, capital gains are generated. With 
the proceeds, the theatre companies can diversify into 
oihsr fields, as Stanley Warner has so ably achieved in its 
acquisition of International Latex. Even if no attractive 
applications could be found immediately for the extra 
funds, the companies can simply reacquire their own com- 
mon stocks. More of their net earnings would then be 
available for dividend payments to each of the remaining 
shares outstanding. 

New Boom for Hollywood? 

Do the rosy prospects we visualize for Hollywood this 
year mark the beginning of a new boom for Hollywood? 



Page 14 Fi!m BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 



I'ublir Swing Superiority of Movies orer T\ 



This of course is a question only time can answer. The 
fortunes of the motion picture industry will continue to 
depend on the quality of its products and the ability of its 
publicity agents to whet the public's appetite. Fundamen- 
tally, however, Hollywood has several governing economic 
factors in its favor. Indications are that over the next few 
years, the average American will have more money for 
recreation and more leisure time for entertainment. In ad- 
dition, the population of Hollywood's most important cus- 
tomer group, the 15- to 24-year-olds, will grow significantly 
in the years ahead. In sharp contrast to the 1.4% contrac- 
tion experienced during the 5 years to 1955, the number of 
persons in that age bracket is expected to show a 12.3% 
expansion during the 1956-60 period. 

From this point on, the movie industry will always have 
to compete keenly with television. Here, though, it appears 
that Hollywood has been gaining an upper hand. After 
the novelty of television in the home has worn away, 
American audiences have become increasingly quality con- 
scious. Perhaps because of the widespread telecasting of 
Hollywood's products in recent months, they are gradually 
identifying quality with the motion picture industry. 
Meanwhile, having superior technical facilities, Hollywood 
is able to present its products on wide curved screens, in 
stereophonic sound and with colorful exotic settings. In- 
deed, movie theatres can offer their audiences the oppor- 
tunity to participate vicariously in the film experience to a 
degree that probably will not be equalled even by color or 
subscription television presentations for many years to 
come. 



Conclusion 

The favorable earnings and dividend prospects we visu- 
alize for the motion picture companies have not, in our 
opinion, been fully discounted by the current market prices 
of their stocks. Many buying opportunities are therefore 
present in this group. A number of these issues provide 
current dividend yields of more than 6%, far superior to 
the average 5.2% return afforded by all dividend-paying 
stocks under survey. Because of the improvement in com- 
pany eranings prospects, these dividends seem well pro- 
tected. In fact, some may even be increased during the 
year. Meanwhile, based on the assumption that the motion 
picture companies will be able to take full advantage of 
the favorable economic climate we hypothesize for the 
1959-61 period the 3- to 5-year appreciation potentialities 
of these stocks seem impressive. Against the average 28% 
gain projected for all stocks, the 3- to 5-year appreciation 
potentiality of the amusement stocks as a group is 56%. 

Detracting somewhat from this favorable prospect, how- 
ever, is the fact that the motion picture industry is a vola- 
tile one and the stocks in it have poor stability records. 
Most of them therefore do not qualify for inclusion in in- 
vestment grade portfolios. But to sophisticated stock pur- 
chasers, willing to accept the inherent risks involved in 
exchange for generous current income and interesting 
growth prospects, the following stocks currently classified 
in Group I (Especially Underpriced) or Group II (Under- 
priced) appear attractive: Paramount Pictures, National 
Theatres, Stanley Warner, and Twentieth Century-Fox. 



BUSINESS: Columbia Pictures produces and distributes 
motion pictures of both "A" and "B" classes for ex- 
hibition in theatres. Screen Gems, Inc., a subsidiary, 
produces films, including commercials, for television; 
also sells and distributes to television stations, the 
backlog of motion pictures from Columbia's film li- 
brary. About 40% of revenues originate abroad. Since 
World War II, cash dividend pay-out has averaged 
35% of earnings. Empolyees: 5,000; stockholders: 
2,342. Revenues have increased 18% faster than dis- 
posable income since 1939. President, H. Cohn. In- 
corporated: New York. Address: 711 Fifth Avenue. 
New York 22, New York. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 

REPORT: Columbia had two pictures in the 
top ten box office attractions of 1956, ac- 
cording to a Variety survey. "Picnic" was 
sixth and "The Eddy Duchin Story", eighth, 
in last year's lineup of top grossing films. 
The estimated domestic gross from these two 
films was $11.6 million. "The Eddy Duchin 
Story" and "The Solid Gold Cadillac" were 
released in the last half of 1956, so revenues 
from these two big attractions will bolster 
results of the current fiscal year. The re- 
ported 70c a share profit in the first fiscal 
quarter (ended last Sept. 30th), while satis- 
factory, is not outstanding since earnings 
from initial release of "The Eddy Duchin 
Story" were included. Earnings gains from 
new films do not match the initial jump in 
revenues, however, since about half of the 
production and film costs are amortized dur- 



COLUMBIA PICTURES 

ing the first 13 weeks after film release. Co- 
lumbia apparently faces some tapering off in 
earnings in the last half of the current fiscal 
year unless several of the new major pro- 
ductions are enthusiastically received at the 
box office. We estimate earnings at $2.55 for 
the current fiscal year ending June 33th, 
compared to $2.22 a share in fiscal 1956. 

The company's releases have not been 
among the top grossers in the past few 
weeks, but early reports indicate that 
"Zarak" has considerable box office poten- 
tial. A Judy Holliday picture, "Full of Life", 
is awaiting release. Columbia plans to re- 
lease about 36 pictures this year, virtually 
the same number as in fiscal 1956. The 
Screen Gems affiliate, producing filmed 
shows for television, is of growing import- 
ance as a source of earnings. Columbia ex- 
pects a 50% increase in total revenues from 
this source in 1957, bringing Screen Gems' 
gross income to about 15% of total com- 
pany revenues. 

Columbia is continuing the policy of dis- 
tributing stock dividends; a 2^% stock dis- 
bursement plus a 30c cash dividend was paid 
on Jan. 30th. All statistics in the accompany- 
ing tables have been adjusted for the stock 



dividend. 

Sales have steadily built up over the years, 
but profit growth has been erratic. Produc- 
tion of television films by the Screen Gems 
subsidiary may lend more stability to sales 
and earnings in the future, however. We 
project average annual sales to $105 million 
in the hypothesized 1959-51 economy, char- 
acterized by a GNP of $455 billion. Average 
earnings of $3.80 a share and dividends of 
$1.75 would then be likely. Capitalized at 
6.2% in accordance with past norms adjusted 
for trend, such a dividend would command 
an average price of 28 (7.4 times earnings). 
ADVICE: Columbia is currently classified in 
Group III (Fairly Priced) because the stock 
stands in line with its Rating which does not 
rise significantly into 1957. The estimated 
6.4% current yield is well above the 5.2% 
average return from all dividend paying 
stocks under survey. Likewise, the 56% 
capital appreciation potentiality to the years 
1959-61 outpaces, by a large margin, the 28% 
gain envisioned for the market as a whole. 
However, the cyclical nature of the business, 
reflected in the low Stability Index (11), re- 
stricts this holding to risk portfolios. 

(Continued tin Page 25) 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 15 



SCREAMING 
EXCITEMENT 
EVERY STEP 
OF THE WAY 



The story of today's 
counter-spy war 
for tomorrow's 
deadliest 
weapon ! 



v 



TERLIN 



AYDE 



11 



m f 



UA 



with WERNER KLEMPERER • RICHARD GAINES • CHARLES DAVIS • JEANNE COOPER - screen piay by henry s. kesler 

Produced and Directed by HENRY S. KESLER • Story by DONALD HAMILTON and TURNLEY WALKER 
Based on the Saturday Evening Post Serial by DONALD HAMILTON • A Grand Productions Inc. Release 



Funny Face" 

Scuutc^ IZatut? GOO 

Frothy musical teams Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire. Loaded 
with comedy, Gershwin tunes. Good for urban areas. 

The refreshing Audrey Hepburn and the durable Fred 
Astaire sing and dance to a half-dozen George and Ira 
Gershwin favorites in this flashy musical comedy from 
Paramount. Roger Edens' VistaVision-Technicolor pro- 
duction, made in Paris, opens on a highly modernistic kick, 
but wanes and runs through a variety of familiar boy- 
loses-gets-girl routines. Despite the synthetic plot, "Funny 
Face" has enough comedy and cavorting to satisfy Astaire 
fans and the multitude waiting to see Miss Hepburn as his 
new dance partner. Highest grosses are likely in metro- 
politan areas. The perennially charming Astaire is per- 
fect, while Miss Hepburn, as the bookworm he lifts into 
high fashions, is thoroughly captivating in a song-and- 
dance role. Her wardrobe will wow the ladies. Comedi- 
enne Kay Thompson debuts as the sour-puss fashion edi- 
tor. Director Stanley Donen keeps the plot moving at a 
lively clip. Photographer Astaire talks magazine editor 
Thompson into using Miss Hepburn to represent their 
"Quality Woman". Bookwcrmish Miss Hepburn objects 
until she learns a trip to Paris is involved. In Paris she 
makes a bee-line to Michel Auclair, a Parisian cuit leader. 
They feud when Astaire tries to convince her Auclair is a 
phony. Miss Hepburn meets Auclair, instead of attending 
a fashion show, discovers he's not interested in her mind. 
She is reunited with Astaire. 

Paramount. 103 minutes. Audrey Hepburn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Produced 
by Roger Edens. Directed by Stanley Donen. 

"Smiley" 

Gututeu Ratio? O Plus 
Cute Australian-made story of barefoot boy doubtful entry 
for U.S. market because of heavy accents. 

The value of this imported boy's adventure story is re- 
tarded by heavy accents. Produced entirely in Australia 
by Anthony Kimmins and released by 20th Century-Fox, 
it should get by with family audiences, especially the 
youngsters. Colin Petersen, as "Smiley", is a mischevious 
nine year-old lad with a laughable cockney accent. Under 
Kimmins' direction, the pace is leisurely, gently amusing. 
The setting is the wild bush country, which is strikingly 
shown in CinemaScope and Technicolor. Kids should en- 
joy "Smiley", despite the difficulty in understanding some 
of the dialogue. British star Ralph Richardson is the only 
player known to American audiences. Young Petersen, 
seeking to earn money for a bike, rings church bells for 
pastor Richardson, sweeps the office for police sergeant 
"Chips" Rafferty, and runs errands for John McCallum, 
who tricks him into delivering opium to the aboriginies. 
Rafferty becomes suspicious. When the boy discovers 
his father has spent the savings on liquor, he goes wild. 
Thinking he knocked down and killed his father, Petersen 
runs away and is lost in the bush. He saves a man about 
to be bitten by a snake, and returns a hero. Rafferty jails 
McCallum and the town buys "Smiley" a bicycle. 

20th Century-Fox. (An Anthony Kimmins Production! . 97 minutes. Sir Ralph 
Richardson, John McCallum, Colin Petersen. Produced and directed by Anthony 
Kimmins. 

[More REVII 



'The Yuuikj Stranger" 

ScoUteM 'Rati*? Q O Plus 

Slick, but talky, drama analyzes juvenile delinquency case. 
Should appeal to all audiences. Strong exploitation needed. 

Here is a realistic, human interest drama about one type 
of juvenile delinquency. While "The Young Stranger" is 
delivered with more dialogue than action and should have 
strongest appeal to mature audiences, the theme is one that 
interests everyone. Above-average grosses should result 
in all situations. However, since marquee values in this 
RKO film (Universal will release it) are weak, heavy ex- 
ploitation will be necessary if its boxoffice potential is to 
be tealized. James MacArthur (Helen Hayes' son) is ex- 
cellent as the lad who gets into a slight jam and aggra- 
vates the "crime" because his busy father will not believe 
his account of what happened. Kim Hunter turns in a 
tender performance as the mother. The young team of 
producer Stuart Millar, director John Frankenheimer and 
author Robert Dozier make an auspicious debut in movie- 
making. The story, adapted from Dozier's TV p'ay, 
"Strike A Blow", has MacArthur, age 16, thrown out of a 
movie theatre by manager Walt Bissell when he and a pal 
make some noise. When MacArthur pushes back and hits 
Bissell, he calls police. The youth's father, James Daly, a 
movie producer, gets Bissell to drop charges though con- 
vinced of his son's guilt. Disturbed over his father's lack 
of belief, MacArthur pleads with Bissell to tell Daly the 
truth, and socks him again. Police sergeant James Gregory 
realizes the boys' trouble and gets Bissell to confess in 
front of Daly. Father and son are united. 

Universal-International release. (An RKO Production). 84 minutes. James Mac- 
Arthur, Kim Hunter, James Daly. Produced by Stuart Millar. Directed by John 
Frankenheimer. 

"The Man Who Turned to Stone" 

'Bcutnc^x RaU*f O O 

Supernatural thriller has fair exploitables. However, treat- 
ment is dated. Tepid dualler for ballyhoo houses. 

inveterate horror film fans might work up some mild 
interest in this somber, grade C exploitation entry Sam 
Katzman's Clover unit for Columbia release. It should 
serve adequately as a dualler in action and ballyhoo houses. 
The treatment is dated and the "scare" gimmicks obvious 
as Victor Jory, Ann Doran, Paul Cavanagh, and Frederick 
Ledebur (he played the aborigine in "Moby Dick") depict 
scientists who are about 200 years old and live on by elec- 
trically drawing off the life force of women reformatory 
inmates. Director Leslie Kardos plays up the sadistic angle 
with screaming girls being carried off in the night by a 
hali-man-half-ape character, and drained of their blood in 
a solution-filled vat. Prison director Jory and his assistants 
murder women inmates and list their death as cases of 
"heart attrack". Then welfare worked Charlotte Austin 
learns that girls are heard screaming in the night before 
they disappear. State psychiatrist William Hudson dis- 
covers the secret from Cavanagh who, unable to react to 
transfusions, leaves his diary. The ape-like Ledebur kid- 
naps Miss Austin, but she is saved by Hudson as the labor- 
atory burns down with the mad scientists all inside. 

Columbia. (A Clover Production). 80 minutes. Victor Jory, Ann Doran. Charlotte 
Austin. Produced by Sam Katiman. Directed by Leslie Kardos. 

on Page 20] 

Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 17 



THIS IS WHAT 
THEY'RE ASKING FOR! \ 



., mare. COLOR BUfc 



color con* £ a$ we l a* tbe , e * 




Color by 

TECHNICOLOR 

IS THE ANSWER! 



And now.... 



The curtain 




TECHNIRAMA, the spectacular new large-screen color motion picture 
product developed by TECHNICOLOR " is now ready to excite 
theater audiences the world over. 

TECHNICOLOR Corporation proudly announces that TECHNIRAMA 
was selected for production of the great color motion pictures listed 
here . . . soon to be released for premiere showings . . . 



if DAVY— Ealing Production — Metro Goldwyn-Mayer 

ESCAPADE IN JAPAN -RKO Radio Pictures. Inc. 
it LEGEND OF THE LOST-A Batjac Production -United Artists 

NIGHT PASSAGE —Universal Pictures Co.. Inc. 
"5^T SAYONARA — Goetz Pictures. Inc. — Warner Bros. Pictures. Inc. 
lV SEA WALL -De Laurentns-Columbia 

SLEEPING BEAUTY-Walt Disney Production - Buena Vista Film Dist. Co.. Inc. 
it SOUVENIR D'lTALIE- Athena Rank 

it THE MONTE CARLO STORY -Titanus F,lms-Un,ted Artists 



TECHNICOLOR 
through TECHNIRAMA 
offers: 

Large area negative photography 
using standard 35mm film 

Most efficient use of negative area 



Versatility — Standard or 
road-show prints all from one 
original negative 



Greatly improved picture 
sharpness 



Freedom from graininess 

Increased depth of focus 
© 

Minimum image distortion 



TECHNICOLOR CORPORATION 



MOTION PICTURE DIVISION 

Herbert T. Kalmus, President and General Manager 



"The True Story of Jesse James" 

Su4iKCA4 IZatiKQ O Q PIUS 
New version attempts to debunk the legend. OK for action 
houses. C'scope and color plus-factors. 

In a series of flash-back explanations by those who knew 
him best, this new version of the Jesse James saga ques- 
tions whether he was a Robin Hood or a murdering thief. 
While the explanations slow the pace, "The True Story" 
has enough of the elements to satisfy action fans. Herbert 
B. Swope, Jr.'s CinemaScope-De Luxe color production for 
20th Century-Fox should show fair-plus returns in gen- 
eral situations. Robert Wagner and Jeffrey Hunter lend 
mild marquee value, but bring nothing new to their inter- 
pretations of the brothers Jesse and Frank. Walter New- 
man, wrote the screenplay from an original script by Nun- 
nally Johnson, employs rather trivial and unconvincing in- 
cidents to debunk the legend. Fortunately, director Nicho- 
las Ray plays up the lengthy train and bank robbery se- 
quences with lots of gunplay and hard riding. Directly 
after the James brothers' biggest bank job, during which 
most of the gang is killed, story flashes back to the inci- 
dents that drove them to crime and plunder. At age 16, 
Wagner, as Jesse, is flogged by Northern sympathizers be- 
cause he will not inform on his brother, Hunter. When 
Wagner attempts to surrender after the Civil War, he is 
wounded and driven to crime. While recovering, he courts 
and weds Hope Lange. Wagner gains a notorious reputa- 
tion over the years, but when he decides to settle on a 
farm, he is shot in the back by his cousin for the reward. 

20th Century-Fox. 92 minutes. Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter Hope Lange. Pro- 
duced by Herbert "B. "Swope. Jr. Directed by Nicholas Ray. 

"Ten Thousand Bedrooms" 

^cuiKCM &atttt$ O O Plus 

Light-hearted comedy with tunes showcases Dean Martin in 
first solo. Good fun. Should draw above-average. 

This is Dean Martin's first solo without Jerry Lewis. It 
is a frothy comedy with new songs tailored to his talents. 
While the story-line is rather simple, it offers enough ex- 
citement, sex, comic type-casting, musical numbers, and 
Roman backdrops to make it entertaining. Joe Pasternak's 
CinemaScope-Metrocolor production for M-G-M shapes up 
as good fare for general market. Anna Maria Alberghetti 
and Eva Bartok are well-stacked Italian sisters vying for 
Martin's affection. Walter Slezak, Paul Henreid, and Jules 
Munshin back them up as diverse comic types. Other plus 
factors are the flashy costumes and new songs by Nicholas 
Brodszky and Sammy Cahn. Director Richard Thorpe 
maintains a snappy pace, with Martin constantly involved 
in his gay affairs with the alluring sisters. Tycoon Martin 
arrives in Rome to take over his latest purchase and is es- 
corted by employee Miss Bartok. They are mutually at- 
tracted, but her young sister, Miss Alberghetti, soon 
sweeps Martin off his feet. Slezak will not permit Miss 
Alberghetti to wed because his three older daughters are 
single. Martin attempts to pair Miss Bartok with Henreid, 
a sculptor, but he then realizes he, himself, is in love with 
Miss Bartok, and learns his pilot, Dewey Martin, loves 
Anna Maria. Love finds a way. 

M-G-M. 114 minutes. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberghetti Eva Bartok Paul 
Henreid, Walter Slezak. Produced by Joe Pasternak. Directed by Richard Thorpe. 



"Fear Strikes Out" 

Su4uu44 1£<iti*4 O G Plus 
Emotional, true-life story of Jim Piersall's mental crackup, 
baseball comeback. Name values tepid, exploitables good. 

This is the life story of Jim Piersall, Boston Red Sox 
outfielder. Those who promptly react with the popular 
conclusion that any baseball movie has "two strikes 
against it" had better consider this in terms of a mature, 
hard-hitting drama. The sports phase is secondary to the 
depiction of a sensitive young athlete's mental crackup 
under the pressure of his father's driving ambition, and his 
eventual comeback to balance and success. "Fear Strikes 
Out" is vividly acted and directed, a rather depressing, but 
always engrossing, film. Produced by Alan Pakula in 
black-and-white VistaVision for Paramount, it will require 
maximum exploitation effort to realize its boxoffice poten- 
tial. Where sold, grosses should be above average. An- 
thony Perkins, as Jim, and Karl Maiden, as his father, turn 
in graphic performances. While they cannot be regarded 
as top-rank marquee names, their recent work in "Friendly 
Persuasion" and "Baby Doll", respectively, has increased 
their marquee value. Adam Williams is highly effective as 
the psychiatrist who treats Piersall and Norma Moore is 
appealing as the girl he marries. Director Robert Mulligan 
emphasizes characterization. Perkins trains hard to fulfill 
the ambitions of his constantly prodding father, Maiden, 
who wants him in the major leagues. Perkins marries Miss 
Moore, a nurse, during his first minor league season in 
Scranton. They have one child. When Perkins finally 
makes the Boston Red Sox, pressure, tension, and respon- 
sibilities prove too much for him and he suffers a complete 
mental breakdown. Confined to a hospital for months, he 
recovers through the help of his wife and a psychiatrist, 
Williams, and makes his own decision to return to base- 
ball, in which he achieves fame. 

Paramount. 100 minutes. Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden, Norma Moore. Produced 
by Alan Pakula. Directed by Robert Mulligan. 

"Pharaoh's Curse" 
StuineM, RaitH? Q Plus 

Low-budget chiller set in Egyptian tomb. Satisfactory sup- 
porter for ballyhoo houses. Lacks names. 

In its category as supporting meller for a dual-bill bally 
program, this low-budget Bel-Air Production for UA will 
get by. Offering chills and thrills in lieu of a name cast 
and production values, Howard W. Koch's production will 
satisfy addicts of the eerie and supernatural. It's all wholly 
incredible and Lee Sholem directs strictly by the book, 
bringing the monster into close range whenever the plot 
stagnates. To counteract riots, British authorities dis- 
patch Mark Dana to halt American archaeologist Neise 
from disturbing an ancient tomb. Diane Brewster, Neise's 
unhappy wife, goes along to join her husband. A spooky 
"cat goddess", Ziva Rodann, steps out of the desert to 
bring evil forebodings. When Neise cuts open the mummy, 
a native feels the pain and turns into walking mummy that 
feeds on human blood. Several members of the expedition, 
including Neise, are killed by the monster before Dana 
seals the tomb and returns to Cairo. 

United Artists. IA Bel-Air Production). 66 minutes. Mark Dana, Ziva Rodann, 
Diane Brewster. Produced by Howard W. Koch. Directed by Lee Sholem. 



Page 20 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1757 



'ZV&at t&e S&acumw /lie *Doi*tq! 

MERCHANDISING & EXPLOITATION DEPARTMENT f 



n 



x-4 




Interest in 'Oscar' Sweepstakes 
Mounts as Starting Date Nears 



With theatre participation snowballing into 
mountainous proportions, the Academy 
Awards Sweepstakes is bidding to become 
one of the biggest movie-interest stimulators 
in recent years. Over 1700 theatres had 
pledged participation in the "Oscar" guess- 
ing game, with hundreds more poised to 
enter in the days remaining before the nomi- 
nations for the movie Oscars (Feb. 19). 

Exhibitors who have raised the question 
as to whether they should enter into the 
campaign, since they would not have played 
the nominated pictures, were reassured on 
this point by Robert W. Coyne, COMPO 
special counsel, last week. "The voter is 



be imprinted immediately after the Oscar 
nominations February 19 and will be avail- 
able to theatres at $2.50 a thousand. The 
entire kit of essential materials, aside from 
the entry blanks, will be sold to first run 
and subsequent run theatres for $25; other 
theatres will pay $15 for the kit. 




enter the big : * ! * 



' guessing contest 
ACADEMY AWARD 

SWEEPSTAKES 

CONTUT INSS WUtH M, 1997 

One of the ads in pressbook 

not passing judgment on the pictures and 
players he has seen," he pointed out, "but 
trying to guess the choices of experts." Pre- 
vious experience in Texas and Canada 
proved that movie fans are eager to try their 
luck at picking the winners, having heard or 
read about them in newspapers, etc." 

On the accessories front, National Screen 
started the extensive job of sending the 
Sweepstakes pressbook to the nation's thea- 
tres and girding itself for the task of supply- 
ing display material, trailers and entry 
blanks to participating houses. Blanks will 



Oscar A. Doob. veteran movie publicist, has 
been named by COMPO as consultant on the 
industry business-building program, it was 
announced last week by Robert W. Coyne. 
Doob was formerly advertising-publicity head 
of Loews Theatres. 

While the pressbook lists several impor- 
tant "do's" for the campaign — organization 
of a committee representing participating 
theatres, newspapers, merchants; lining up 
and promoting prizes; speedy overnight im- 
printing of prize lists on entry blanks and 
several other vital phases of the campaign, 
it also details Academy regulations which 
contain several "dont's" — prohibition of use 
of the famous Oscar statuette in the con- 
test; no tabulations to show regional or na- 
tional preference in contrast with the Acade- 
my voting; no mention of or tie-in with 
Oldsmobile as radio-TV sponsor; of the 
Awards show; a notice that "this is not an 
Academy ballot" but an opportunity to 
match wits with the experts. 

Closing date is March 26, day before the 
"Oscar" winners are announced. 

Edwards Joins Rank Distribs 

Steve Edwards has been named to a key 
promotion spot in the new Rank Film Dis- 
tributors of America promotional organiza- 
tion. The former Republic ad-publicity di- 
rector will serve as assistant to Geoffrey 
Martin, domestic director of advertising and 
publicity for the Rank organization. 

Lederer To Assist WB's Golden 

Dick Lederer was moved up in the Warner 
Bros, advertising department to assistant to 
ad manager Gil Golden. He will work with 
Golden on all advertising functions. 

[More SHOWMAN on Page 24] 



Baby Sitters Give Parents 
Movie Bonus in Novel Co-op 

Baby sitting with a movie bonus — for the 
parents — is the novel idea being practiced 
successfully by the Safety Pin Club, Inc., a 
New York baby-sitting service with an eye 
to promotion. 

The Club, long established in Gotham, is 
offering clients a discount of 75 cents per 
sitting session if the parents give the sitter 
a pair of consecutively numbered stubs from 
the admission tickets of cooperating theatres. 

The gimmick is not limited to New York, 
of course. It should give theatremen every- 
where an idea in contacting reputable local 
baby-sitting services to set up a similar deal. 



TAB HUNTER BLUNDER 

Television appear- 
ances by movie stars 
can be a two-edged 
sword, as was pain- 
fully apparent in the 
recent appearance by 
Tab Hunter as a 
guest panelist on 
"What's My Line?" 
Whoever set up the 
guest shot must have 
been red-faced in- 
deed as the self-con- 
scious young star 
made a woefully in- 
adequate panelist among the experts, 
stirring one 'teenager to remark sadly. 
"What a dope!" — and losing a Hunter 
fan. The Hunter incident points up the 
care with which stars should be spotted 
on TV shows. Merely tossing them into 
any prominent show just to get a plug in 
for a picture can boomerang violently, 
leaving a dark brown taste if the person- 
ality fails to register. Panel shows es- 
pecially are risky even for the brightest 
stars when contrasted with experienced 
quizzers. TV's a great promotional medi- 
um but it can lose as many movie fans as 
it can make if used indiscriminately. 




BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



EXPLOITATION PICTURE 

'Drango'- Outdoor Drama a Juicy Showmen's Item 



The showman must condition himself to 
think of "Drango" as something other than 
a western. That is essential at the outset in 
preparing for exploitation of this United Ar- 
tists release. The title does carry a western 
flavor, and the post-Civil War era in which 
the action occurs has often been employed 
for western fare, but while the picture carries 
strong appeal for devotees of oaters, it boasts 
a story containing far more dramatic meat 
than one usually finds in such films. 

Marking the production debut of star Jeff 
Chandler in a hand-picked role, "Drango" 
offers the taut theme of z veteran of Sher- 
man's destructive march through Georgia 
returning to the town he had pillaged to ad- 
ministrate the reconstruction. The violent 
hatred he encounters among the townspeople 
marks the essence of the drama, making a 
powerful pillar around which to build up the 
campaign. 

The ads and lithos take full advantage of 
this situation, playing up the townspeople's 
bitterness in the copy — "Hell-Riding Plun- 
derer" . . . "Blood Mad Killer" . . . "And 
now he was alone against the vengeance- 
made town!" There are also ads designed to 
intrigue the ladies with illustration and copy 
playing up the romance in a clinch scene 
headed "Impassioned". The variety is es- 
pecially attractive, ranging from a shouting 
action theme to dignified woodcut simplicity. 

With Chandler at the purse-strings, the 
star-producer is giving his initial venture an 
all-out in-person campaign. He is currently 
on a 7000-mile tour to drumbeat his picture 
and initial openings have reflected the effects 
of his personal touch. The personal appear- 
ance junket was set up with important New 
York spots on top-rated TV and in news- 
paper features which were carried on the 
wire services, both insuring national pene- 
tration. The receptions in the towns he is 
hitting on the p.a. tour indicate that the 




Jeff Chandler's appeal, to the distaff side par- 
ticularly, is evident in these views of his 7000- 
mile personal appearance tour on behalf of 
"Drango". Top, the star-producer at a coke- 
and-camera party with girls of Emery University, 
Atlanta. Below, in Baton Rouge, teen-agers 
ecstatically crowd around car carrying the star 
in motorcade through the Louisiana capital. 



road-work type of promotion continues to 
rate high as a publicity weapon, especially 
with the younger people. 

There are a pair of important angles in the 
music department. With Julie London rid- 
ing high as a recording star and television 
personality, her appearance in the picture 
offers excellent opportunities for tie-ups with 
disc jockeys and music stores. So, too, does 
the title song, which is getting a boost from 
the platter-spinners and music stores. 



STUNTS 

An outstanding stunt campaign has been 
worked out by UA's exploiteers, based on 
the title and the action, with the company's 
ace-high field staff alerted to lend ready aid 
to showmen playing the picture. 

The piquant title, while it has no meaning 
ordinarily to the moviegoer, is one that will 
be remembered and a bally pegged to the 
name will be an important factor in gaining 
the film penetration. Three good ones are 
suggested in the pressbook: 

With the local newspaper as sponsor, send 
a man in Union Army officer's uniform 
around town with prizes awarded to the first 
10 persons who approach him with a copy of 
the newspaper and address him with the 
words "You are Major Drango". Daily news 
pictures of winners and experiences will be 
added gravy for the run. 

Another tied in with the paper would be a 
setup with the ad manager to spot one letter 
of the title in each of six ads (run of paper 
or classified) with prizes to readers who 
locate the ads and send in a 25-word letter 
on "Why I Want To See 'Drango'." 

Teasers in the personals column or around 
the theatre with the message that "Drango 
is coming! Does he dare return to the town 
he once had ravaged? Call (theatre phone 
number) for the answer," is an example of 
this effective stunt. 

A pair of exciting street stunts will have 
'em talking. A scene from the film in which 
masked riders take a gagged and bound 
mounted prisoner to a lynching can be re- 
peated wherever horses are able to navigate 




the town's streets (see cut). Riders would 
distribute herald and carry sign reading, 
"We're heading for the Blank Theatre to 
find Drango". 

Another features a crowded street photo 
taken daily by newspaper photog. The title 
would be superimposed on the published 
photo and the person whose face is encircled 
by the letter "O" would receive guest tickets. 

Using the theme in which Drango returns 
to the South he had ravaged as a soldier in 
Sherman's army, the showman can apply it 
to thousands of veterans who at one time or 
another returned to the area where they had 
fought in Europe, the Pacific or Korea. In- 
terviews in newspaper, TV or radio would 
make interesting material based on such 
questions as, "What was their reaction?" 




The wide selection of ads are 
packed with stark, dramatic impact. 
Ad shown here stresses theme and 
star with the classy wood-cut art 
adding an eye-catching effect. The 
same style is used in ads highlight- 
ing the romantic angles, with the 
hanging touch ever-present to lend 
added drama and the impression of 
violence that underlies the theme. 
Smoldering action and drama indi- 
cated in the ad pictured is con- 
trasted with others available 
screaming out the message, with 
sometimes the art, sometimes the 
copy getting the spotlight. 



Page 22 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 





'DRANGQ 



A situation fairly tingling with 
dramatic possibilities serves as the 
core for producer-writer-director 
Hall Bartlett's "Drango". The 
screenplay brings an officer of Sher- 
man's ravaging Army, Jeff Chand- 
ler, back to a small Georgia town as 
its reconstruction administrator. De- 
spite the raw hatred that meets his 
every move to lend a helping hand, 
Chandler persists, refusing to resort 
to indiscriminate retaliation even 
when a Union sympathizer who had 
come to him for protection is hanged 
by a band of terrorists, led by Rol- 
and Howard (son of the late Leslie 
Howard). Chandler's refusal to 
meet violence with violence incurs 
the wrath of his own superiors, who 
cut off supplies, threatening all his 
efforts to rehabilitate the town. 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 23 



Uj&at t&e S&owmw /tie *D<Uayi 




Metro ad chief Si Seadler and new Broad- 
way star Gena Rowlands (center) fan some pro- 
motional flames in N. Y. C. for "Edge of the 
City" by awarding a drama scholarship to an 
aspiring actress. Award is one of four grants 
donated by John Cassavetes, star of the film. 

Mich. Showman Aims at Ferns 
With Tor Women Only' Matinees 

A series of matinees "for women only" is 
helping Bert Penzien build boxoffice and 
good will with the opposite sex at his Shores 
Theatre in suburban Detroit. With the in- 
auguration of a women only policy at 
Wednesday matinees, the Michigan show- 
man is pitching a program of love stories 
and art films keyed to fern tastes. Typical 
of the films scheduled are "Three Coins in 
the Fountain", "The Swan", "Autumn 
Leaves". To augment the features, Penzien 
books short subjects with a distinct feminine 
slant, and, as an added selling angle, coffee 
and goodies are served gratis to the matinee 
patrons, with the concession closed during 
these special shows. 

This shapes up as an excellent stunt to 
lick the problem of declining patronage 
among the ladies. Penzien's idea could well 
be used by other exhibitors. 

THE WINGS OF EAGLES CONTEST 

DINNER 
JON THE HOUSE 
K$g&A I I FOR TWO 



Re-schedule Program Times 
To Hypo Attendance— Henreid 

With an eye on the multitude of movie- 
goers who are unable to make the first show 
about 7 p.m. and don't want to take in a 
second show that starts about 10 p.m., actor- 
producer Paul Henreid suggests a re-sched- 
uling of program times in an effort to ener- 
gize theatre attendance. 

In a letter sent to Southern California ex- 
hibitors, Henreid sets forth the idea that the 
slating of the main feature in the 8 to 9 
o'clock slot would result in increased box- 
office. Believing the suggestion is worth a 
trial, he suggests to the theatremen that they 
experiment with feature time changes. "The 
major studios schedule their previews around 
8:30 and are successful in having an audi- 
ence at that time — if they advise the public 
in advance. That proves people will go out 
in greater numbers at that time." 

Continuing, Henreid said: "Therefore, if 
the exhibitor scheduled his program so that 
the principal attraction went on at that rea- 
sonable hour, he would eliminate the many 
negatives in today's exhibition. Families 
which have home chores like washing dishes 
and personal chores like cleaning up at the 
end of the day, would have time to make the 
show without rushing. If they can't make it 
on the present early main feature time, they 
have a tendency to sit home in front of the 
television set, retiring at a reasonable hour. 
It's difficult to keep an impulse alive until 
the last show." 

If the proposed experiment by the Pacific 
coast exhibitors is successful, Henreid be- 
lieves that the pattern will be followed else- 
where with accompanying boxoffice in- 
creases. 



John Wayne Dan Dailey 
Maureen O'Hara 



The WINGS! 
of EAGLES' 




Goldman Turns Bad Weather 
Into Public Relations Boon 

A very shrewd bit of public relations can 
be credited to William Goldman, prominent 
Pennsylvania theatremen, with his advertised 
offer to exchange tickets for patrons who 
were unable to use their reserved seat tickets 
because of inclement weather. When a 
heavy snow storm recently hit Philadelphia, 
many ticketholders to the Randolph ("The 
Ten Commandments") and the Midtown 



TO OUR PATRONS ... I 

f TH0SE WHO WERE UNABLE TO I 

. USE THEIR TICKETS FOR EITHER jfi 

= THE RANDOLPH OR MIDTOWN ■ 

THEATRE DUE TO THE WEATHER 9 

FRI. SAT. or SUN. FEB.. 1, 2, 3 I 

MAY EXCHANGE THEM AT THE 
5°* ° FF| CE FOR TICKETS FOR 

ANOTHER PERFORMANCE. f 



- "WIR^T- K-k Douglas |Mi*S RABY coopf? - 

("Around the World in 80 Days") couldn't 
get to the downtown area because of snarled 
traffic conditions during the bad-weather 
weekend. By offering his patrons a "snow 
check", the dynamic circuit executive 
grabbed a bonanza of good will with his 
generous offier — via paid space and accom- 
panying editorial copy in the local press. 

WB's 'St. Louis' Pitches 
For Teenagers Via Tab Hunter 

In a unique drumbeating safari aimed at 
the teenage group, Warner Bros, is sending 
bobby-sox idol Tab Hunter on a nationwide 
promotional tour for "The Spirit of St. 
Louis", a motion picture in which he does 
not even appear. 

The 12-city tour, which kicked off Febru- 
ary 7, is designed to acquaint youngsters in 
such cities as Detroit, Chicago, Buffalo and 
Atlanta with the film version of Charles 
Lindbergh's epic flight. Hunter is visiting 
with television-radio personalities and fourth- 
estaters in each stop to bally the Leland 
Hayward production. Promotional weapons 
carried by the youthful star include RCA 
albums of the pictures' sound track, copies 
of the Pulitzer prize book and a host of 
other exploitation tools. The film, which 
stars James Stewart as the famed flyer bows 
February 21 at NYC's Radio City Music 
Hall, with Easter set as the national release 
date. 



♦ Credit the Liberty Theatre, Portland, Oregon 
with a sock "Wings of the Eagles" contest in 
the rotogravure section of the Sunday Ore- 
gonian. By coming up with the current trade- 
marks and slogans of local business concerns 
lucky winners were gifted to dinner on the house 
at a well-known restaurant and a pair of ducats 
to the John Wayne film. 



Page 24 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 



'Continued from Page 15) 

- 1USINESS: Loew's is the last fully integrated producer, 
distributor and exhibitor of motion pictures. Divest- 
ment of theatres to take place in 1957. Theatres 
■nainly in Northeast, presently account for about 40% 
>f revenues. Pictures, under MGM trademark, account 
or most of the rest. Foreign revenues about 40% of 
! ilm earnings. Labor costs, over 65% of revenues. 
Since World War II. earnings almost completely paid 
jut as dividends. Directors own or control 81,700 

" shares 11.4% of total). Has 14,000 employees. 29.440 

e shareholders. Brd. Chrmn., A. M. Loew; Pres. Joseph 
Vogel Incorporated: Delaware. Address: 1540 Broad- 

' -ay, New York 34, New York. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 

REPORT: An impending proxy fight at 
Loew's annual meeting in February has been 

! averted by settlement upon a compromise 
slate of directors. The major change in the 
composition of the board has been the re- 
placement of Loew's management represen- 

| tatives by a number of executives from busi- 
nesses outside the motion picture field. 

The new board will have several thorny 
problems to contend with. First on the agen- 
da is the long-overdue separation of Loew's 
producing and exhibiting activities, stymied 
for some months by disagreement on the 
proper allocation of the company's large 
funded debt. Divestment proceedings, now 
scheduled for March, will probably have to 
be postponed again. 
A sterner challenge to the new directorate 



LOEW'S, INC. 

will be the revitalization of Loew's film pro- 
ducing division. Despite economy moves, 
this division has apparently continued to 
suffer operating losses, probably due to a 
lack of sufficient top-quality pictures. For- 
merly the dominant unit in its industry, 
Loew's now seldom places more than one 
movie on any "ten most popular" list. Profits 
from such undisputed hits as "High Socie- 
ty", "Lust for Life", and "Teahouse" are 
eroded in such costly misadventures as "The 
Barretts of Wimpole Street", which proved 
to be the poorest opening week drawing card 
in 13 years at the Radio City Music Hall. 

Of the 91c a share earned by Loew's in 
fiscal 1956 (ended Aug. 31st), more than 
half was accounted for by a non-recurring 
capital gain and down payments on the ren- 
tal of its film library to television stations. 
Film rentals will again constitute an impor- 
tant (and growing) part of company earn- 
ings in fiscal 1957. Profits will be further 
shored up by a revision of the company's 
film amortization schedule. (Had the new 
schedule been in effect in fiscal 1956, earn- 
ings would have been 22c a share greater.) 

Although segregation of Loew's picture 
producing and theatre activities will un- 



doubtedly have been completed by 1959-61, it 
is impossible to make separate projections of 
the earning power of the two companies until 
full financial information has been disclosed 
and the funded debt allocated. For the com- 
pany as presently constituted, revenues 
might average $205 million annually, earn- 
ings $2.10 a share, and dividends $1.25 in the 
hypothesized 1959-61 economy. Such results, 
capitalized at 10 times earnings and on a 
6% yield basis in line with past experience 
adjusted to trend, would command an aver- 
price of 21. However, the systematic dis- 
position of company assets (including its 
land, real estate, studio properties, and film 
library) might result in the realization of a 
price of $30 a share for the stock. 

ADVICE: Loew's is currently classified in 
Group III (Fairly Priced). The stock repre- 
sents a speculation on the eventual realiza- 
tion of $30 or more a share through the 
liquidation of company assets. For this rea- 
son, the Value Line Rating (which is based 
on earnings and dividends) is not projected; 
however, investors should note that the stock 
is generously priced in relation to its current 
and prospective operating results. 



BUSINESS: Paramount Pictures Corp. produces and dis- 
tributes Class A motion pictures primarily. Owns 
Vistavision. Operates largest theatre chain in Canada. 
Holds 25% interest in Du Mont Laboratories as well as 
Du Mont Broadcasting Corp.. 85% interest in Inter- 
national Telemeter Corp. ( "pay-as-you-see" TV broad- 
casting); 50% interest in Chromatic Television Labs., 
Inc. (developer of low cost color TV tube). About 
50% of total revenues derived abroad. Directors own 
about 27,000 shares of stock (1.2% of total). Em- 
ployees: 4.000; stockholders: 22.117. Brd. Chrmn., A. 
Zukor. Pres., B. Balaban. Inc.: N. Y. Add.: 1501 
Broadway, New York 34, New York. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 

REPORT: At 31, the common stock of Para- 
mount Pictures is available at a 21% discount 
from its book value (estimated at about $39 
a share). Since the company's books do not 
include its fully-amortized library of feature 
films and since they carry fixed assets and 
"other investments" at but a fraction of their 
market worth, the book value itself is under- 
stated. Ordinarily, the mere fact that a stock 
is trading below its asset value does not, by 
itself, make it an attractive investment medi- 
um. Unless the company is able to increase 
its earning power, such under-valuation is of 
little significance to many investors. How- 
ever, Paramount seems capable of broaden- 
ing its earnings base significantly. 

The company has been increasing substan- 
tially its investments in the production of 



PARAMOUNT PICTURES 

motion pictures, upgrading the quality of its 
products. For example, two of its current 
releases — "War and Peace" and "The Ten 
Commandments" — involve an unprecedented 
total production cost of about $20 million. 
Management's courage in turning out such 
expensive spectaculars is now being reward- 
ed at the box office. In the domestic market 
alone, "War and Peace" is believed to have 
already returned an amount sufficient to re- 
coup its negative cost. The picture is pres- 
ently receiving excellent acceptance overseas. 
Similarly, playing in only 15 theatres for an 
average of 5 weeks each, "The Ten Com- 
mandments" grossed a record $2.2 million 
during November and December. Many in- 
dustry observers now believe that this re- 
ligious epic will generate at least $40 million 
over the next two years. 

Meanwhile, the company is diversifying 
into growth fields. Recently, it acquired Dot 
Records, Inc., a successful manufacturer of 
popular phonograph records. Moreover, 
through its many partially-owned subsidiar- 
ies, Paramount is accelerating its activities in 
the electronics industry. These undertakings 
are likely to yield handsome dividends over 
a period of time. 



Paramount has also been conducting an 
extensive study on the "best uses" of its 
huge library of old films. It is reasonable to 
expect that within the next year or two, 
some arrangements will be made for the re- 
lease of these pictures to television. Before 
too long, therefore, an additional, important 
source of income will be created. Within the 
hypothesized 1959-61 economy we project 
Paramount's average annual revenues to $145 
million, earnings to $5.75 a share and divi- 
dends to $3. Capitalized at 8.7 times earn- 
ings to yield 6%, consistent with past norms 
adjusted for trend, such results would com- 
mand an average price of 50. 
ADVICE: Paramount Pictures is currently 
classified in Group I (Especially Under- 
priced). The stock provides an exceptionally 
generous current yield of 7.3% to 8.1%, on 
the basis of larger total dividend disburse- 
ments we estimate for 1957. Furthermore, 
the issue offers a superior 3- to 5-year ap- 
preciation potentiality of 61%, vs. the aver- 
age 28% gain projected for all stocks. For 
accounts willing to accept the risks inherent 
in a motion picture stock, Paramount Pic- 
tures appears especially interesting at this 
time. 



BUSINESS: Twentieth Century-Fox produces and dis- 
tributes Class A feature films primarily. Owns Cine- 
maScope, a wide screen projection process and has a 
50% interest in the recently formed N. T. A. Film 
Network. Also controls theatre chains in Africa Great 
Britain, Australia and New Zealand. Foreign revenues 
account for about 48% of receipts. Labor costs, about 
45% of revenues. Directors own or control about 4% 
of total outstanding common shares. Company employs 
about 9,000, has 19,000 stockholders. Pres. S. P. 
Skouras, V. P.'s. J. Moskowitz. S. C. Einfeld, W. C. 
Michel, M. Silverstone. Incorporated: Delaware. Ad- 
dress: 444 W. 54th St., N. Y. 19 N. Y. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 



TWENTIETH CENTURY-FOX 

REPORT: Twentieth Century-Fox earned 
only $1.20 a share during the first 9 months 
of 1956, or no more than the dividends paid 
in the same period. Nonetheless, we do not 
believe the current 40c a share quarterly rate 
is in jeopardy. In fact, a strong possibility 
exists that total disbursements in 1957 will 
be increased to $1.80 a share. Reasons: (1) 



results for the December quarter, when re- 
leased, are expected to show a profit in ex- 
cess of $1 a share, as against the 60c reported 
for the same period a year ago; and (2) with 
many of its excellent new films gaining 
wider distribution and with dividend income 
from foreign theatre subsidiaries increasing 
(Continued on Page 26) 



Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 Page 25 



VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 



(Continued from Page 25) 

steadily, the company will probably be able 
to boost net profits this year to about $3 a 
share. 

Included in last year's income is approxi- 
mately $1 a share derived from the leasing 
of television rights to the company's old fea- 
ture films. Since income will continue to be 
received from this venture over the next 
several years, we do not regard it as a non- 
recurrent item. Under an agreement recent- 
ly reached with National Telefilm Associates, 
which company syndicates films to television 
stations, Twentieth has begun leasing 390 of 
its pre-1948 productions for television use. In 
return, it has been guaranteed a minimum 
receipt of $30 million over a 5-year span. 
(The company has also been given a 50% 
stock interest in the newly organized NTA 



Film Network). Through 1960, therefore, 
the company will be receiving from this 
source at least $6 million annually, on aver- 
age, equivalent to $1.10 a share after taxes. 
Since Twentieth has the additional right to 
participate in the gross rentals received by 
National Telefilm once a certain level is 
reached, its receipts during the late Fifties 
may well exceed the minimum amount guar- 
anteed. 

While Twentieth has strengthened its 
position in the television field, the motion 
picture business remains its principal ac- 
tivity. Here, the company is stepping up its 
production of feature films on the one hand, 
and expanding its theatre holdings abroad 
on the other. Assuming that the company 
will sell a portion of its real estate properties 
and use the proceeds to reacquire some of its 



own common shares, we project the com- 
pany's average annual gross revenues in the 
hypothesized 1959-61 economy to $150 mil- 
lion, earnings to $4.65 a share and dividends 
to $2.50. Capitalized on a yield basis of 6.3%, 
in line with past norms, such dividends 
would justify an average price of 40 (8.6 
times earnings). 

ADVICE: Twentieth Century-Fox is currently 
classified in Group II (Underpriced). At 25, 
the stock provides a generous current yield 
of 6.7% to 7.5%. Furthermore, it offers a 
striking 3- to 5-year appreciation potentiality 
of 67%. While not suitable for investment- 
grade portfolios (Quality Rank: B — ), this 
issue appears of interest to those in a po- 
sition to assume considerable risks for the 
sake of better-than-average dividend income 
and extraordinary capital gain prospects. 



BUSINESS: Warner Bros. Pictures produces both class 
A and class B films distributed through film exchanges 
located in principal cities throughout the world. 
Through subsidiaries, operates a music publishing busi- 
ness and holds a 3 7 '/2 % interest in a major British the- 
atre chain. About 40% of revenues derived in foreign 
markets. Payroll absorbs about 45% of revenues. Di- 
rectors control about 500,000 shares of common stock, 
27% of total outstanding. Company employs about 
4,000; has 15,600 stockholders. President Jack L. War- 
ner, Exec. V. P., Benjamin Kalmenson. Inc.: Delaware. 
Address: 321 West 44th Street, New York 34, N. Y. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 

REPORT: The controversy stirred up by 
"Baby Doll" has given the picture an ex- 
ceptionally large amount of free publicity. 
While some people may have heeded the ad- 
monition given by Cardinal Spellman and 
have therefore refrained from seeing the film, 
probably a great many more have been 
driven by their curiosity to find out what 
has made this picture so exciting. This un- 
expected windfall from "Baby Doll", to- 
gether with continuing success of "Giant", is 
likely to give a strong boost to the com- 
pany's profits this year. With 26% fewer 
common shares outstanding, per share earn- 
ings in the current fiscal year, which ends 
August 31st, are expected to recover sharply 
to $1.70 a share from the 84c a share re- 
ported for fiscal 1956. (In September 1956, 
the company reacquired nearly 640,000 



WARNER BROS. 

shares of its common stock from stock- 
holders for approximately $18 million.) 

Since last July, Warner Bros, has had on 
its board two representatives from the finan- 
cial world — Charles Allen, Jr. of Allen & 
Co. and Serge isemenenko of First National 
Bank of Boston. Ostensibly under their in- 
fluence, the company has been carrying out 
a program of partial asset liquidation, de- 
signed to enhance its stockholders' equity. In 
September, it disposed of its newsreel sub- 
sidiary, reportedly for about $500,000. More 
recently, it concluded an agreement to sell 
its 10-story office building in New York for 
an undisclosed amount of cash. This pro- 
gram of divesting real properties will prob- 
ably be accelerated in the years ahead. The 
company is likely to apply the proceeds to 
retire more of its own stock and to diversify 
into other fields. 

To be sure, the new management is not 
breaking up the company. Where prospects 
seem promising, Warner Bros, is expanding 
its activities. It is currently spending $600,- 
000 to construct an ultra-modern building in 
Burbank, Calif, to provide additional facili- 
ties for the production of television films. 
Earlier, the company established a commer- 



cial and industrial film department, in an ef- 
fort to capitalize on the burgeoning market 
for industrial film productions. 

Assuming the new management will be 
successful in reversing the long term down- 
trend in the company's profit margin, we 
project average revenues in the hypothesized 
1959-61 economy to $90 million annually, 
earnings to $4 a share and dividends to $2.50. 
Capitalized at 10 times earnings to yield 
6.3% consistent with past norm adjusted for 
trend, such results would command an aver- 
age price of 40. 

ADVICE: Trading at 16.3 times earnings and 
on a yield basis of only 4.6%, the present 
price of Warner Bros, fully discounts the 
earnings and dividends in sight for the year 
ahead. However, the company is currently 
going through a period of transition. By the 
end of this decade, when its program of asset 
realignment is completed, Warner Bros, will 
probably be able to show substantially larg- 
er earnings. To the years 1959-61, the stock 
offers an appreciation potentiality of 54%, 
as against the average 28% projected for all 
stocks. Accordingly, we classify this issue 
in Group III (Fairly Priced). 



BUSINESS: ABC-Paramount owns and operates largest 
motion picture theatre chain in U.S. labout 575 thea- 
tres, principally in Midwest. South and Atlantic sea- 
board) and third largest radio and TV network (net- 
work owns and operates 5 TV stations: has over 200 
affiliated stations). Labor costs absorb about 60% of 
revenues. Dividends have averaged about 75% of 
operating earnings in the last 4 years. Directors own 
or control about 9% of total common shares. Employs 
20,000, has 24,700 common stockholders. Pres.: L. H. 
Goldenson. V.P.'s: H. B. Lazarus, E. L. Hyman, S. M. 
Markley, R. H. O'Brien, R. H. Hinckley. Inc.: N. Y. 
Add.: 1501 Broadway, New York 34, N. Y. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 



REPORT: In the 1956-57 broadcasting year, 
the revenues of American Broadcasting Co., 
a principal subsidiary of ABC-Paramount, 
are expected to show but a moderate rate 
of growth. Perhaps because most sponsors 
now perfer to bring their advertising mes- 
sages to adult TV viewers, sales of the im- 
portant "Mickey Mouse Club" children's 



ABC PARAMOUNT 

program have fallen considerably below 
those of the preceding year, even though 
this 5-hour a week presentation continues to 
win top ratings for its particular time period. 
Since "Mickey Mouse Club" contributes an 
appreciable percentage to over-all television 
revenues, its present sales decline is erasing 
a good portion of the gains chalked up by 
the network's other successful shows. 

Under the personal supervision of Pres. 
Goldenson, however, ABC is determined to 
revitalize its long-term sales growth trend. 
The network has been working assiduously 
to realign and strengthen its program for- 
mat. It is presently planning, for example, 
to reduce "Mickey Mouse Club" from a one- 
hour to a half-hour weekday presentation. It 



has also contracted Walt Disney, who has 
repeatedly demonstrated his ability to turn 
out audience-drawing TV productions, to 
present a new adventure series, "Zorro", to 
be introduced over ABC beginning next Oc- 
tober as a nightime show. Earlier, the com- 
pany signed up the versatile Frank Sinatra 
to appear on its network exclusively for 
three years. 

While broadcasting revenues are expected 
to show only slight year-to-year gains dur- 
ing the greater part of calendar 1957, theatre 
receipts which continue to represent more 
than half of aggregate income, are expected 
to expand significantly this year. The recent 
elimination of the 10% federal excise tax on 
admissions 90c or under will alone provide a 
strong boost to theatre earnings. Further- 



Page 26 Film BULLETIN February 18, 1957 



VALUE LINE ANALYSIS 



more, the nation's movie attendance will 
probably respond favorably to the large 
number of promising films that are coming 
from major studios. Meanwhile, ABC-Para- 
mount itself is scheduled to produce several 
pictures this year. 

Within the hypothesized 1959-61 economy, 
ABC-Paramount's average annual revenues 
are projected to $275 million, earnings to $4 
a share and dividends to $2.40. Capitalized 



on a 6"o yield basis, consistent with industry- 
wide norms, such dividends would command 
an average price of 40 (10 times earnings). 
ADVICE: ABC-Paramount's price history is 
too short to enable us to evolve a Rating 
through multiple correlation analysis. Refer- 
ence to capitalization ratios applied to similar 
equities of its class suggests, however, that 
selling at 10 times earnings to yield 6.1% to 
6.5%, the stock currently warrants a Group 



III (Fairly Priced) classification. This issue 
is of particular interest for its superior 3- to 
5-year appreciation potentiality, 74% vs. the 
average 28% gain projected for all stocks. 
While the stock is not suitable for inclusion 
in investment grade portfolios (Quality 
Rank: B — ), risk-taking accounts might find 
ABC-Paramount a worthwhile holding for 
generous dividend income and attractive 
capital growth prospects. 



BUSINESS: National Theatres controls 335 operating 
theatres located mainly in the Pacific coast, Midwest, 
and Rocky Mountain area. Also operates Roxy Thea- 
tre in N.Y. The chain is the second largest in the U.S. 
Labor costs, 40% of revenues. Dividends have aver- 
aged only about 38% of earnings during the 1953-55 
period. Directors own or control about 132,500 shares 
of stock 14.8% of total outstanding!. Employees'. 
4 900- stockholders: 14,800. President: E. C. Rhoden, 
Vice Presidents: F. H. Ricketson, Jr., J. B. Bertero, E. 
F. Zabel. A. May. Incorporated: Delaware. Address: 
1837 South Vermont Ave., Los Angeles A, California. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 

REPORT: National Theatres strengthened its 
financial position considerably in the 1956 
fiscal year, which ended Sept. 25th. During 
the year, the company reduced its outstand- 
ing long term debt by $4.3 million, reac- 
quired 70,000 shares of its own common 
stock, redeemed $380,000 face amount of 
subsidiary preferred stock and at the same 
time managed to increase its working capital 
by $3.6 million. This remarkable achieve- 
ment was made possible primarily by the 
proceeds from sales of some of its real estate 
properties, including the Roxy Theatre in 
New York. 

In the years immediately ahead, .National 
will probably continue to carry out its pro- 
gram of reducing and realigning real estate 
holdings. The rate at which this project will 



NATIONAL THEATRES 

be executed will depend, of course, on how 
profitably the properties can be marketed. 
However, a company spokesman recently 
suggested that by the end of this decade, the 
number of theatres operated by National 
might be reduced by 10%. It is interesting 
to note that this program of property divest- 
ment is not likely to result in reduced thea- 
tre earnings. Most of the theatres to be dis- 
posed of are either closed or have not been 
operating profitably. In fact, by eliminating 
some of these unproductive properties the 
company will be in a position to lower its 
aggregate overhead expenses and widen its 
overall profit margin. 

National Theatres will probably be able to 
put its present large working capital, as well 
as the proceeds from future property sales, 
to good use. Already it is proceeding to 
produce a picture in "Cinemiracle", a new 
wide-screen picture process recently de- 
veloped by the company. Other funds are 
expected to be employed to acquire a growth 
company outside the motion picture field, if 
such a promising enterprise can be found. If 
not, we believe National Theatres will reac- 



quire some of its own common stock, reduc- 
ing thereby the total number of shares out- 
standing and increasing the effective earning 
power of the remaining shares. (While 
under the terms of existing long-term debt 
agreements, the company currently has only 
$2.7 million of its retained earnings available 
for cash dividend payments and re-purchases 
of capital stock, it is believed that the re- 
strictions may soon be relaxed or lifted.) 

Within the hypothesized 1959-61 economy. 
National's average annual revenues are pro- 
jected to $80 million, earnings to $1.65 a 
share and dividends to 80c. Capitalized at 
8.5 times earnings to yield 5.7%, consistent 
with past norms adjusted for trend, such re- 
sults would command an average price of 14. 
ADVICE: Classified as especially underpriced 
when last reviewed in November, National 
Theatres has since advanced 1^4 points 
(19%). However, the stock continues to ap- 
pear interesting to risk taking accounts. It 
provides a generous current dividend return 
of 5.8% to 7% and offers a wide 3- to 5-year 
appreciation potentiality of 62.% The stock 
is therefore currently classified in Group II 
(Underpriced). 



BUSINESS: Stanley Warner owns or leases 30A theatres 
located mainly in the eastern states. In 1953 it formed 
partnership with Cinerama Productions to exploit Ciner- 
ama process. Presently operating over 20 Cinerama 
theatres. In 1954 acquired International Latex Corp., 
a manufacturer of consumer rubber goods under "Play- 
tex" label. Principal manufacturing plants are in Man- 
chester and Newman. Ga., Arnprior, Canada, Port 
Glasgow, Scotland, and Puerto Rico. Has 10,000 em- 
ployees, IA.500 stockholders. Directors control about 
IA% of total crmmcn shares. Pres., S. H. Fabian; 
Exec. V. P., S. Rosen. Inc.: Delaware. Address: 1585 
Broadway, New York, New York. 

Stock traded: NYSE. 
REPORT: By diversifying into promising fields 
both within and outside the motion picture 
industry, Stanley Warner has demonstrated 
the feasibility of converting unproductive 
assets into profitable businesses. In 1953, 
when revenues from its ordinary theatre 
operations were still declining, the company 
formed a partnership with Cinerama Produc- 
tions to produce and exhibit the revolution- 
ary wide-screen pictures. The following year 
it reached beyond the Hollywood border and 
acquired International Latex Corp., a suc- 
cessful manufacturer of consumer goods 
marketed under the trade name of "Playtex". 
These ambitious ventures have resulted in a 
marked improvement in the company's 
earning power. 

A good portion of this earning potential 
will probably be realized this year. Now 



STANLEY WARNER 

playing in 26 theatres at home and abroad, 
all three of the Cinerama pictures so far re- 
leased have been grossing well. With the 
bulk of negative costs and theatre opening 
expenses already written off during the past 
few years, a larger percentage of box-office 
receipts is likely to be carried down to the 
net income level henceforth. Concurrently, 
fostered by a larger flow of quality films 
from Hollywood and the recent elimination 
of the 10% federal excise tax on all admis- 
sions up to and including 90c, profits from 
theatres other than the Cinerama houses are 
also expected to improve. 

The most notable contribution to higher 
earnings, however, will probably be made by 
International Latex. Since last August, this 
wholly-owned subsidiary has been carrying 
on a multimillion dollar promotional cam- 
paign, reaching 28 million American homes 
through television. The advertising program 
has resulted in an increasingly heavy influx 
of orders for "Playtex" products. In antici- 
pation of this sales boom,, the company con- 
structed several ultra-modern factories last 
year, including one each in Georgia, Puerto 
Rico and Scotland. (The heavy costs in- 
curred in starting up these factories have 



been responsible in part for the relatively 
narrow profit margins in the last few 
months.) By utilizing the new facilities more 
fully, the company will probably be able to 
widen its profit margin as volume expands, 
mounting labor and raw-material costs not- 
withstanding. 

Within the hypothesized 1959-61 economy 
we project Stanley Warner's average annual 
revenues to $140 million, earnings to $3.90 a 
share and dividends to $2. Capitalized at 8.5 
times earnings to yield 6%, consistent with 
past norms adjusted for trend, such results 
would justify an average price of 33. 
ADVICE: Stanley Warner has advanced 2 
points (13%) since it was last reviewed three 
months ago, when it was classified as espe- 
cially underpriced. At 17, however, the stock 
continues to provide a generous dividend re- 
turn of 5.9% to 7.1% over the next 12 
months, compared to the average 5.2% yield 
afforded by all dividend-paying stocks under 
survey. Moreover, this issue offers an extra- 
ordinary 3- to 5-year appreciation potentiali- 
ty of 94%, as against the average 28% gain 
projected for all stocks. We accordingly 
classify Stanley Warner in Group II (Under- 
priced) at this time. 



Film BULLETIN February 18. 1957 Page 27 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



All The Vital Details on Current &> Coming Features 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



ALLIED ARTISTS 



CALLING HOMICIDE Bill Elliot, Jeane Cooper, Kath- 
leen Case. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Edward 
Bernds. Melodrama. Policeman breaks baby extortion 
racket, 61 min. 

FIGHTING TROUBLE Huntz Hal), Stanley Clements, 
Oueenie Smith. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director George 
Blair. Comedy drama. Bowery Boys apprehend hood- 
lums by fast work with a camera. 61 min. 
STRANGE INTRUDER Edward Purdom, Ida Lupino, Ann 
Harding, Jacques Bergerac. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Irving Rapper. Drama. A returning Korean vet 
makes a strange promise to a dying comrade-in-arms. 
81 min. 



October 



CRUEL TOWER, THE John Ericson, Mari Blanchard, 
Charles McGraw. Producer Lindstey Parsons. Director 
Lew Landers. Drama. Steeplejacks fight for woman 
on high tower. 80 min. 

YAOUI DRUMS Rod Cameron, Mary Castle. Producer 
William Broidy. Director Jean Yarbrough. Western. 
Story of a Mexican bandit. 71 min. 



November 



BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in the death cell. 74 min. 
FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Marjorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Ouaker family during the Civil War. 13? min. 10/1 

December 

HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 
HOT SHOTS Huntz Hall, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 62 min. 



January 



CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

STORM OUT OF THE WEST Dale Robertson, Brian Keith, 
Rossano Rory. Producer Frank Woods. Director Brian 
Keith. Western. 72 min. 



February 



ATTACK Of THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. Hideous monsters take over remote 
Pacific Island. 68 min. 

LAST OF THE BADMEN CinemaScope, Color. George 



as onty recogrti»ebl« man in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 
NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 67 min. 



March 



FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT Bill Elliot, Don Haggerty. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Melo- 
dfama. Man is sought by police for murder of his 
friend. 62 min. 

HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Hunrz Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle with unscrupulous hypnotist. 

JEANNIE CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony Martin, 
Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Director 
Henry Levin. Musical. Small-town girl meets washing 
machine inventor in Paris. 105 min. 



Coming 



BADGE OF MARSHAL BRENNAN Jim Davis. Producer- 
director Albert Gannaway. Western. 

CRIME BENEATH THE SEA Mara Corday, Pat Con- 
way, Florence Marly. Producer Norman Herman. 
DAUGHTER Of DR. JEKYLL John Ag^ar, Gioria Talbot, 
Ar*ur Shields. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar Unger. Horror. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 
Freeman. Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 
stockade in small western town. 81 min. 
HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME, THE CinemaScope, 
Color. Gina Lollobrigida , Anthony Quinn. A Paris 
Production. Director Jean Delannoy. Drama. Hunch- 
back falls in love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 



LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wilder. Drama. 

OKLAHOMAN, THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
of unscrupulous brothers. 81 min. 



COLUMBIA 



October 

PORT AFRIQUE Technicolor. Pier Angelli, Phil Carey, 
Dennis Price. Producer David E. Rose. Director Rudy 
Mate. Drama. Ex-Air Force flyer finds murderer of 
his wife. 92 min. 9/17. 

SOLID GOLD CADILLAC. THE Judy Holliday, Paul 
Douglas, Fred Clark. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Filimiiation of the famous 
Broadway play about a lady stockholder in a large 
holding company. 99 min. 8/20. 

STORM CENTER Bette Davis, Brian Keith, Paul Kelley, 
Kim Hunter. Producer Julian Blaustein. Director Daniel 
Taradash. Drama. A librarian protests the removal of 
"controversial" from her library, embroils a small 
town in a fight. 85 min. 8/6. 

November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdenald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD, THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 
graphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
Yves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 

WHITE SQUAW, THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wajlace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bick- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 

December 

LAST MAN TO HANG. THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. THE Takashi Shimura, Toshiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Akira Kurosawa. 
Meiodrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/iO 
RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY. THE Technicolor. Randolph Scott, 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the glory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 



January 



DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, Alan Dak. Producer Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor Fred Sear*. Musical. Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 1/7. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest, Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
- notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 



February 

NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray, Anne Bancroft. Producer Ted 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaken 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money. 
78 min. 12/10. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun, Susan Cummings, Angela 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred Sears. 
Western. Two men join hand* because they see in each 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 75 min. 
WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Phil Carey. Pro- 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. A 
beautiful girl wins a beauty contest and a "different" 
life. 132 min. 1/21. 



March 

FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rita 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A War- 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drama. 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is in- 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 

c U ,°\ OF » LIFE Judy HoU^ay, Richard Conte. 
Salvatore 8accaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wife 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival of 
child. 91 min. 1/7. 

MAN WHO TURNED TO STONE, THE Victor Jory, Ann 
Doran. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Leslie Kardos. 
Mad doctor discovers secret of prolonged life. Horror 
80 min. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW, THE Betty Garrett, Phil 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Director 
William Asher. Melodrama. Seven-year old boy is the 
only witness to a murder. 

A pril 

GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murphy, Kathryn 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brewn. Director George 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women to 
fight off Indian attack. 



Coming 



BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. Cor- 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Direc- 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men seek 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Grayson. 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
S^ars. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/15 
GARMENT JUNGLE, THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Mat- 
thews, Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. Di- 
rector Robert Aldrich. Drama. 

HALF PAST HELL Victor Mature, Anita Ekberg, Trevor 
Howard. A Warwick Production. Director John Gilling. 
KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller, Carol Thurston. Pro- 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad- 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-man 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroyed 
by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

PAPA, MAMA, THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureux, 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul Le 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisian 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

STRANGE ONE. THE Ben Gazzara, James Olsen, George 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James Gar- 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames com- 
mander and his son. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atle 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor- 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in World 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL T, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone, Maureen 
Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Director Budd 
Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles o be 
independent. 

27TH DAY. THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Producer 
Helen Ainsworth. Director' William Asher. Science- 
fiction. People from outer space plot to destroy all 
human life on the earth. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY, THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmore. 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Drama. 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



October 

GUNSLINGER Color I American- Internationa II John Ire- 
land, Beverly Garland, Alison Hayes. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Western. A notorious gunman terrorizes 
the West. 

PASSPORT TO TREASON (Astor Pictures) Rod Camer- 
on, Lois Maxwell. Producers R. Baker, M. Berman. 
Director Robert Baker. Drama. Private investigator 
stumbles upon a strange case of murder. 70 min. 
RIFIFI . . . MEANS TROUBLE (United Motion Picture 
Organization) Jean Servais, Carl Mohner. Director 
Jules Dassis. Melodrama. English dubbed story of 
the French underworld. 120 min. 11/12. 
SWAMP WOMEN IWoolner) Color. Carole Mathews, 
Beverly Garland, Touch Connors. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Adventure. Wild women in the Louisiana 
bayous. 



November 



MARCELINO lUnited Motion Picture Organization I 
Pabilto Calvo, Rafael Rivelles. Director Ladislao 
Vadja. Drama. Franciscan monks find abandoned baby 
and adopt him. 90 min. 11/12. 



Film 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



MARCH SUMMARY 

Features scheduled for March release 
total 13. The leading suppliers, with four 
films each, will be Columbia and 20th 
Century-Fox. United Artists and Universal 
w!ll release three each, while Allied Ar- 
tists, Metro, Paramount, Republic and 
RKO will place two on the roster. One 
film each will be released by Warner Bros, 
and DCA. Exactly half of the total, 13. 
will be dramas; 14 March films will be in 
color. Eight features will be in Cinema- 
Scope, two in Naturama, one in Vista- 
Vision. 

3 Adventures 13 Dramas 

1 Comedy 4 Westerns 

2 Melodramas 2 Musicals 
1 Horror 



SECRETS OF LIFE IBuena Vista I. Latest in Walt Dis- 
ney's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/29. 
J SHAKE. RATTLE AND ROCK lAmerican-lnternationall 
Lisa Gaye, Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson 

I] Director Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 
j roll" music. 

WEE GORDIE IGeorge K. Arthur! Bill Travers. Elastair 
Sim. Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 

\ Frank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 

I stature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwing cham- 

I pionship. 94 min. 11/12. 

WESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS IBuena Vista) Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kathleen Crowley. 

I A Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 

December 

BABY AND THE BATTLESHIP, THE (DCAI Richard 
Attenborough, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
borough. Director Jay Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 
smuggled aboard a British battleship during mock 

■ maneuvers. 

BED OF GRASS ITrans-Lux) Anna Brazzou. Made in 

I Greece. English titles. Drama. A beautiful girl is per- 
secuted by her villiage for having lost her virtue as 

I the victim of a rapist. 

HOUR OF DECISION lAstor Pictures) Jeff Morrow. 
Drama. 

LA SORCIERE (Ellis Films) Marina Vlady, Nicole 

Courel. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A young French 
I engineer meets untamed forest maiden while working 
I in Sweden. French dialogue, English subtitles, 
k MEN OF SHERWOOD FOREST (Astor Pictures) East- 
I man Color. Don Taylor. Producer Michael Carreras. 
I Director Val Guest. Adventure. Story of Robin Hood 
I and his men. 78 min. 

ROCK. ROCK. ROCK (DCAI. Alan Freed. LaVern 
I Baker, Frankie Lyman. A Vanguard Production. Musical 
| panorama of rock and roll. 

SNOW WAS BLACK, THE I Continental I Daniel Gelin, 
I Valentine Tessier. A Tellus Film. French language film. 
I Drama. Study of an embittered young man who lives 
I with mother in her house of ill fame. 105 min. 

TWO LOVES HAVE I Uaconl Technicolor. Gabriele 
I Ferzetti, Marta Toren. A Rizioli Ftlm. Director Carmine 
I Gallone. Drama. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 
I best known operas. 

January 

ALBERT SCHWEITZER (Hill and Anderson) Eastman 
I Color. Film biography of the famous Nobel Prize win- 
I ner with narritive by Burgess Merideth. Producer-direc- 
I tor James Hill. Documentary. 

BULLFIGHT I Janus). French made documentary offers 
I history and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
I and directed by Pierre Braunberger. 76 min. 11/26. 

FEAR lAstor Pictures) Ingrid Bergman, Mathias Wie- 
I man. Director Roberto Rossellini. Drama. Young 
I married woman is mercilessly exploited by blackmailer 
I 84 min. 

VITTELONI (API-Janus). Franco Interlenghi, Leonora 
| Fabrizi. Producer Mario de Vecchi. Director F. Fel- 
I lini. Comedy. Story of unemployed young men in Italy. 
I 103 min. 11/26. 

WE ARE ALL MURDERERS IKingsley International) 
Marcel Mouloudji, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
I Gayette. Drama. 

February 

FLESH AND THE SPUR I American-International ) Color. 
I John Agar. Maria English. Touch Connors. Producer 
I Alex Gordon. Director E. Cahn. Western. Two men 
I search for a gang of outlaw killers. 86 min. 
| HOUR OF DECISION lAstor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
I Hazel Court. Producer Monty Berman. Director Denn- 
ington Richards. Melodrama. Columnist's wife is in- 
I nocently involved in blackmail and murder. 70 min. 
1 NAKED PARADISE I American-International) Color. 
, Richard Denny, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Drama. Man and woman bring Ha- 
waiian smugglers to justice. 72 min. 

ROCK ALL NIGHT lAmerican-lnternational) Dick 
Miller, Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Rock n' roll musical. 

TEMPEST IN THE FLESH (Pacemaker Pictures) Ray- 
mond Pellegrin, Francoise Arnoul. Director Ralph 
Habib. French film, English titles. Drama. Study of a 
young woman with a craving for love that no number 
of men can satisfy. 

March 

WOMAN OF ROME IDCA) Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
Gelin. A Ponti-DeLaurentiis Production. Director Luigi 
Zampa. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
novel. 

Coming 

CITY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen, Robert 
Hutton, Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Petroff. 
Drama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 
IF ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . IBuena Vista) 
Andre Valmy, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 
Drama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 
their efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 
IT CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International) 
Peter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 
space takes control of the world until a scientist gives 
his life to save humanity. 

LOST CONTINENT (IFE) CinemaSccpe, Ferranicolor. 
Producer-director Leonardo Bonzi. An excursion into the 
wilds of Borneo and the Maylayan Archepelago. Eng- 
lish commentary. 86 min. 

UNDEAD, THE lAmerican-lnternational) Pamela Dun- 
can, AHUon Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. 71 min. 



NEAPOLITAN CAROUSEL IIFEi ILux Film, Romel Path.- 
coior. Print by Tecnnicoior. Sophia Loren, Leonid* 
Massin*. Director Ettore Giannini. Musical. The history 
at Nap.es traced from 1600 to date in song and oance. 
OKLAHOMA WOMAN (American Releasing Cor.. I 
Suoerscope. Richard Denning, Peagie Castle Cathy 
Downs. Producer-director Roger Corman. Western A 
ruthless woman rules the badlands until a reformed 
outlaw brings her to justice. 80 min. 

REMEMBER, MY LOVE I Artists-Producers Assoc . I Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer, 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

RUNAWAY DAUGHTERS lAmerican-lnternational) 
Maria English, Anna Sten. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
rector Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
age problems. 

SMOLDERING SEA, THE Superscooe. Producer Hal E. 
Chester. Drama. Conflict between the tyrannical cao- 
tain and crew of an American merchant ship reacnes 
its climax during battle of Guadalcanal 
WEAPON, THE Suoerscope. Nicole Maurey. Producer 
Hal^ £. Chester. Drama. An unsolved muraer involving 
• b'tt* 1 " U. S. war veteran, a German war Oriae and a 
killer is resolved after a child finas a loadea gun in 
bomb rubbie 



METRO-GO LDWYN -MAYER 



October 

JULIE Doris Day, Louis Jourdain. Producer Marty 
Melcher. Director Andrew Stone. Drama. Jealous hus- 
band plans to kill wife. 99 min. 10/15. 
OPPOSITE SEX, THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
June Alyyson, Joan Collins, Dolores Gray. Producer 
Joe Pasternak. Director David Miller. Comedy. The 
perfect w!' e is unaware of flaws ; n her marriaae until 
a gossip friend broadcasts the news. 116 min. 10/1. 
POWER AND THE PRIZE CinemaScope. Robert Taylor, 
Burl Ives, Elisabeth Mueller. Director Henry Koster. 
Producer Nicholas Nayfak. Drama. Tale of big business 
and international romance. 98 min. 9/17. 

November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, Bob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
87 min. 1/21. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME, THE Tom Ewell, Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 
TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON. THE Cinema- 
Scope, Eastman Color. Marlon Brando. Glenn Ford, 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Comedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 
123 min. 10/29. 

January 

ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson, Martine Carol, Gustave Rojo. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. Beautiful girl seeks help of con- 
traband runner to rescue brother from Communists. 
EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 85 min. 1/7. 

SLANDER Van Johnson, Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutsch. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 81 min. 1/7. 

February 

BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET, THE CinemaScope. 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gielgud. Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. Love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 105 min. 1/21. 

HOT SUMMER NIGHT Leslie Nielsen, Coleen Miller. 
Producer Morton Fine. Director David Friedkin. Melo- 
drama. Story of a gangland hide-out. 86 min. 2/4. 
WINGS Of THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne, Dan 
Dailey, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. Life and times of a naval 
aviator. 110 min. 2/4. 

March 

LIZZIE Eleanor Parker. Richard Boone, Joan Blondell. 
Producer Jerry Bressler. Director Hugo Haas. Drama. 
A young girl lives three digerent lives. 
TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberghetti. Producer 
Joseph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 
A hotel tycoon falls in love with a lovely Italian girl. 

Comms 

DESIGNING WOMAN Gregory Peck, Lauren Bacall, 
Dolores Gray. Producer Dore Schary. Director Vincente 
Minnelli. Ace sportswriter marries streamlined blond 
with ideas. 100 min. 

HAPPY ROAD. THE Gene Kelly, Michael Redgrave, 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors, Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 
100 min. 2/4. 

LITTLE HUT, THE MetroColor. Ava Gardner. Stewart 
Granger. Producers F. Hugh Herbert. Director Mark 
Robson. Comedy. Husband, wife and wife's lover are 
marooned on a tropical isle. 93 min. 



LIVING IDOL, THE CinemaScope. Eastman Color. 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Al Lewir.. Drama. An archeologlst is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle 1 800 's. 

SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson Dana Wynter, 
Wendy Hiller. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. Stry of a Mau Mau uprising 
in Kenya, East Africa. 

THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT Jean Simmons. Paul 
Douglas. Comedy. A girl fresh out of college gets a 
job as secretary to an ex-bootlegger. 

VINTAGE, THE Pier Angeli. Mel Ferrer. Leif Erickscn. 
Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Jeffrey Hayden. Dra- 
ma. A conflict between young love and mature re- 
sponsibility. 



PARAMOUNT 



November 

MOUNTAIN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane has 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in the 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about the 
movies. 95 min. 12/10. 

WAR AND PEACE VistaVision Technicolor Auarev 
Hepburn Henry Fonda Mei Ferrer. Producers Cane 

»-intl Dine ")« ■.au'-entiis Director find Vidsr. Drama 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 

January 

THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter. Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 

100 min. 1/7. 

February 

RAINMAKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster, Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 

March 

FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden, 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of the Boston baseball player. 
100 min. 

OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget, Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure. 
The life and times of medieval Persia's literary idol. 
103 min. 

Coming 

BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N.Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 105 min. 

BUSTER KEATON STORY, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth, Rhonda Fkming. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. Life of the great comedian. 
DELICATE DELINQUENT, THE Jerry Lewis, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. Janitor longs to be police officer so he 
can help delinquents. 101 min. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audrey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens. Director Stanley Donen. Musical. Photographer 
plu.:ks tashion model from Greenwich Village bookshop 
103 min. 

CUNFIGHT AT O.K. CORRAL VUtaVJilon, Technicolor. 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas. Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallls. Director John Sturges. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his cheating 

brother. 122 min. 

JOKER IS WILD, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Frank 
Sinatra, Mitii Gaynor, Jeanne Crain. Producer Samuel 
Briskin. Director Charles Vidor. Drama. Film biography 
of Joe E. Lewis, nightclub comedian. 
LONELY MAN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Perkins, Elaine Aiken. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he Is losing his sight — and his aim. 
SPANISH AFFAIR VistaVision, Technicolor. Carmen 
Sevilla, Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director 
Donald Siegel. 

TEN COMMANDMENTS. THE VistaVision Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston. Yul Brynner, Anne Bax*e'. "roducer- 
director Cecil B. DeMille Religious drama. Life storv 

of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 21? min. 10/15 
TIN STAR. THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda, Anthony 
Perkins. A Perlherg-Seaton Production. Director An- 
thony Mann. V:- vtern. 



REPUBLIC 



October 

SCANDAL INCORPORATED Robert Hutton, Paul Rich- 
ards, Patricia Wright. A C.M.B. Production. Director 
Edward Mann. Drama. Expose of scandal magazines 
preying on movie stars and other celebrities. 79 min. 
MAN IS ARMED. THE Dane Clark, William Tallman 
May Wynn. Associate producer Edward White. Director 
Franklin Adrecn. Melodrama. Young man is tricked 
into life of crime by crooked boss. 70 min. 

November 

A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker, 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 
CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope, Trucolor. 
Johanna Matz, Rudolf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intri*gue and mystery in Vienna during 
the time of Prince Metternich. 90 min. 

December 

ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor, Naturama. David 
Brian, Vera fcalston. Melodrama. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland 
lawyer is murdered by attractive girl singer. 74 min. 
IN OLD VIENNA Trucolor. Heim Roettinger, Robert 
Killick. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal. Romances and triumphs of Frani Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 



January 



ABOVE UP THE WAVES John Mills John Gregson 
Donald Sinden. Producer W. MacQuitty. Director Ralph 
Thomas. Drama. Midget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWII. 92 min. 1/21. 
TEARS FOR SIMON Eastman Color. David Farrar 
David Knight, Julia Arnall. A J. Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama. Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child stolen. 91 min. 



February 



AFFAIR IN RENO Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G. Spring- 
stein Drama. Young heiress falls for fortune-hunting 
gambler. 75 min. 

DUEL AT APACHE WELLS Naturama, Trucolor. Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Western. Son returns home to 
find father s ranch threatened by rustler-turned-rancher. 

March 

HELL'S CROSSROADS Naturama. Stephen McNally 
Peggie Castle, Robert Vauhgn. Producer Rudy Ral- 
ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after joining Jesse James' gang. 73 min. 
SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Trucolor, Naturama. Vera 
Ralston, Rod Cameron. Producer-director Joe Kane. 
Drama. An unscrupulous lumberman tries to coerce the 
owners of a large forest acreage into cutting their 
timber at a faster rate. 



October 

FINGER OF GUILT Richard Basehart, Mary Murphy 
Constance (Jummings. Producer-director Alec Snowden. 
Drama. Film producer receives letters from a girl he 
never met, who insists they were lovers. 84 min. 11/26 
TENSION AT TABLE ROCK Color. Richard Egan, 
Dorothy Malone, Cameron Mitchell. Producer Sam 
Weisenthal. Director Charles Warren. Western. The 
victory of a town over violence. 93 min. 10/29. 

November 

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL George Sanders, Yvonne 
DeCarlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor. Producer-director Sharles 
Martin. Melodrama. Tale of an international financial 
wizard. II? min. 1 1/12. 



December 

MAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg, Bill Campbell, 
Karen Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A young locksmith gets 
involved with a group engaged in illegal activities. 



January 



BRAVE ONE. THE CinemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
Ray, Fertnin Rivera, Joy Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. Pro- 
ducer Frank k Mmrlci King. Director Irving Rapper. 
Drama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
wows up with a bull as his main companion and friend 
and how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 

BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Debbie 
Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Adolph Menjou. Producer Ed- 
mund Grainger. Director Norman Tauro^ Comedy. 

Son of department store magnet falls f" salesgirl. 
98 min. 12/24. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 

YOUNG STRANGER, THE James MaeArthur, Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Frankea- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 



February 



CYCLOPS, THE James Craig, Gloria Talbot. Producer- 
director Bert Gordon. Science-fiction. Story of a mon- 
ster moon. 

GUILTY Technicolor, ,1-hn Justin, Barbara Laage. 
Drama. 

SILKEN AFFAIR. THE David Niven, Genevieve Page, 
Ronald Squire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director Roy 
Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on a kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 min. 

THAT NIGHT John Beat, Augusta Dabney, Sbepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Director John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a 15- 
year-old marriage. 

X— THE UNKNOWN Dean Jagger, William Russell. 
Producer A. Hinds. Director Leslie Norman. Science- 
fiction. Keen minded scientist fights awesome creation. 

March 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY, THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 
RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 



Coming 



ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY. THE Eastman Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublia. 
Director Mitchell Leison. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking second place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 
JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hughes Production. Producer 
Jules Furthman Director Josef von Sternberg. Drama. 

UNHOLY WIFE, THE Color. Diana Dors, Rod Steiger, 
Marie Windsor. Producer-director John Farrow. Drama. 
A wife sunningly plots the death of her husband who 
»he has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS. THE Arthur O'Connell, Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director John Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



November 

DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN. THE Robert Arthur. Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 
73 min. 11/26. 

LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley, Richard 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentucky 
locale. 89 min. I 1/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope, Technicolor. Gordon Mac- 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn- 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza- 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 



December 



ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg- 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler. 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Filmization of famous 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 

BLACK WHIP, THE Hugh Marlowe, Adele Mara. Pro- 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. Outlaw 
has black whip as trademark. 77 min. 
GIRL CAN'T HELP IT. THE CinemaScope, De Luxe 
Color. Tom Ewell, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-director 
Frank Tashlin. Comedy. Satire on rock 'h' roll. 97 
min. I/T. 



OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michel. Morgan, Cornell 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd Os- 
wald. Director Yvaa Altgret. Drama. Gold smuggler 
falls in love with lady sent to kill him. Violent ending. 
84 min. 1/21. 

WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. James 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Production. 
Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 



January 



OUIET GUN. THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mara 
Corday. Producer-director Anthony Kimmins. Western. 
Laramie sheriff clashes with notorious gunman. 77 min. 
THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Mllland, Ernest 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Philip 
Dunne. Drama. Ggvernment employee Is wronged by 
too-zealous pursuit of security program. 88 min. 1/21. 



February 



BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina LoHobrigida, Vit- 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Director 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

OH. MEN I OH. WOMENI CinemaScope, Color. Dan 
Dairy, Ginger Rogers, David Niven. Producer-director 
Nunnelly Johnson. Comedy. A psychiatrist finds out 
somethings he didn't know. 

THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope. 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herbert 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The Hves 
and times of America's famous outlaw gang. 
TWO GROOMS FOR A BRIDE Virginia Bruce, John 
Carroll. Producer Robert Baker, Monty Berman. Direc- 
tor Henry Cass. Comedy. 



March 



HEAVEN KNOWS MR. ALLISON CinemaScope De Luxe 
Color. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Producers 
Buddy Adler, Eugene Frenke. Director John Hurton. 
Drama. Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific during 
World War It. 

RIVER'S EDGE, THE CinemaScope, Color. Ray Milland, 
Anthony 0"'"". Debra Paget. Producer Benidlct 
Bogeaos. Director Allan Dwan. Adventure. Story of a 
professional killer. 
STORM RIDER. THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers. A 
Brady-Glasser production. Director Edward Bernds. 
Western. A dust storm brings a stranger to a small 
western town. 



A pril 



CHINA GATE Nat "King" Cole, Gene Barry, Angle 
Dickinson. Producer-director S. Fuller. 
KRONOS Jeff Morrow, Barbara Lawrence, John Emery. 
Producer-director Kurt Neumann. 



Coming 



ALL THAT I HAVE Walter Brennan. 

BADLANDS OF MONTANA Rex Reason, Margia Deane, 
Beverly Garland. Producer H. Knox. Director D. U II- 
man. 

BERNADINE Terry Moore, Pat Boone, Janet Gaynor. 
Producer Sam Engel, Director H. Levin. 
BOY ON A DOLPHIN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. 
Clifton Webb, Alan Ladd, Sophia Loren. Producer Sam 
Engel. Director Jean Negulesco. Comedy. Romantic 
tale with a Greek background. 

BREAK IN THE CIRCLE Forrest Tucker, Eva Bartok. 
Producer M. Carreras. Director V. Guest. Drama. 
DESK SET Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn. Producer 
Henry Sphron. Director W. Lang. 

ISLAND IN THE SUN CinemaScope. DeLuxe Color. 
James Mason, Joan Fontaine, Dorothy Dandndge. Pro- 
ducer DarrvJ Zanuck. Director Robert Rpssen. Drama. 
LURE OF THE SWAMP William Parker, Skippy Homeir. 
Marshall Thompson. 

RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brady, 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director Alan 
Dwan. 

SEA WIFE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Richard Bur- 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director Bob 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarine 
off Singapore harbor. 
SHE-DEVIL. THE Mari Blanchard, J.ack Kelly, Albert 
DekVer. Producer-director Kurt Neumann. 
SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Rich- 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Producer- 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussie boy 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 
THREE FACES OF EVE. THE David Wayne, Joanne 
Woodward. Producer Nunnally Johnson. 
WAY TO THE GOLD, THE Sheree North, Barry Sullivan, 
Jeffrey Hunter. Producer David Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. 

ansfield, Dan Dailey, Joan 



UNITED ARTISTS 



November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness, Angie Dickin- 
son, Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Director 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunman gets 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him when 
wounded. 78 min. 

PEACEMAKER, THE James Mitchell, Rosemarie Bowe, 
Jan Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post. 
Western. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattle- 
men and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



RUNNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dowling, 
I Arthur Franz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Couffer. 

Director Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped fugi- 
! tives are chased by local townspeople and officer of 
i the law. 83 min. 11/12. 

SHARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe, Color. Victor 

Mature, Karen Steele. Producer Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 

Director Jerry Hopper. Drama. Saga of the Navy's 

"underwater-men". 73 min. 10/29. 

December 

BRASS LEGEND. THE Hugh O'Brian. Raymond Burr, 
Nancy Gates. Western. Producer Bob Goldstein. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Western. 7? min. 
DANCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. 
Producer Robert Goldstein, Director Charles Barton. 
Comedy. 79 min. 12/24. 

KING AND FOUR QUEENS, THE CinemaScope, Color. 
Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willis. 
Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 
, stead. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 1/7. 
WILD PARTY, THE Anthony Qui™. Carol Ohmart, Paul 
Stewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 
Horner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval offi- 
cer and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 

January 

BIG BOODLE, THE Errol Flynn, Rossana Rory. A Lewis 
F. Blumberg Production. Director Richard Wilson. Ad- 
venture. A blackjack dealer in a Havana nightclub is 
accused of being a counterfeiter. 83 min. 2/4. 
FIVE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden. 
A Grand Production. Director Henry Kesler. Drama. 
A woman tries to give FBI highly secret material stolen 
from Russians. 80 min. 2/4. 

HALLIDAY BRAND, THE Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lind- 
fors, Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
Joseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
father and son with disaster. 77 min. 2/4. 

February 

CRIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling 
Hayden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 
ambition for her husband leads to murder. 85 min. IA7. 
DRANGO Jeff Chandler, Joanne Dru. An Earlmar Pro- 
duction. Hall Bartlett producer-director. Adventure. 
Union officers try to bring order to a Southern town 
after the Civil War. 92 min. 

MEN IN WAR Robert Ryan, Aldo Ray, Robert Keith. 
Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann. 
Drama. An American infantry platoon isolated in enemy 
territory tries to retreat during the Korean War. 
101 min. 2/4. 

TOMAHAWK TRAIL John Smith, Susan Cummings. A 
Bel Air Production. Director Robert Parry. Western. 
Cowboy versus Indians. A small band of cavalry 
soldiers, greatly outnumbered, battles with Apache 
Indians at close of the Civil War. 61 min. 
VODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff, Beverly Tyler A Bel 
Air Production. Director Reginald Le Borg. Horror. 
Writer is called upon to investigate vodooism on a 
Pacific isle. 74 min. 

March 

BACHELOR PARTY, THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall, 
Jack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 
Mann. Drama. From the famous television drama by 
Paddy Chayefsky. 

DELINQUENTS, THE Tommy Laughlin, Peter Miller, 
Dick Bakalyan. Imperial Productions. Robert Altman 
director. High school student and his girl victimized 
by a teen-age gang. 71 min. 

HIDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
Aubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth. 
Drama. Police officer attempts to clear sister charged 
with murder. 

HIT AND RUN Cleo Moore, Hugo Haas. Producer, di- 
rector Hugo Haas. Middle-aged widower marries show 
girl. She and her boy friend plot his murder. 84 min. 
REVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Dthner, Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
rector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
soldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 min. 

Coming 

BAILOUT AT 43.000 John Payne, Karen Steele. A Pine- 
Thomas Production. Director Francis Lyon. U.S. Air 
Force pioneers bailout mechanism for jet pilots. 
BIG CAPER, THE R«y CUhound, Mary Costa. Pine- 
Thomas Production. Director Robert Stevens. Multi- 
millioa dollar payroll robbery. 

GIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS. THE Lex Barker, Anne 
Bancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production. Di- 
rector Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slayings 
terrorize western resort. 

IRON SHERIFF. THE Sterling Hayden., John Dehner, 
Constance Ford. Producer Jerome Robinson. Director 
Sidney Salkow. 

LONELY GUN, THE Anthony Quinn, Katy Jurado. Pro- 
ducer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 
MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD, THE 

Science-fiction. Deals with a prehistoric sea monster. 
MONTE CARLO STORY, THE Technirama, Color. Mar- 
lene Dietrich, Vittorio De Sica. A Titanus Film. Sam 
Taylor director. A handsome Italian nobleman with a 
love for gambling marries a rich woman in order to 
pay his debts. 

OUTLAW'S SON Dane Clark, Ben Cooper, Lori Nel- 
son. Bel Air Production. Director Lesley Selander. Gun- 
slinger escapes from jail to save son from life of 

PHAROAHS CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Howard Koch. Director Lee Sholem. Horror. Reincar- 
nation of mummies in Egyptian tombs. 



PRIDE AND THE PASSION, THE VistaVision, Techni- 
color. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren. Pro- 
ducer-director Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
guerrilla band marches an incredible distance with a 
4000 pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
ence of 1810. 

SAVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
A Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
falls in love with a peasant who contests her right 
to rule the kingdom. 101 min. 

STREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery, Geraldine 
Brooks. Producer William Berke. Rookie policeman 
clashes with youthful criminals. 

SPRING REUNION Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews, Jean 
Hagen. Director Robert Pirosh. Producer Jerry Bresler 
Comedy. 79 min. 

fROOPER HOOK Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck, Ed- 
ward Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marquis 
Warren. A white woman, forced to live as an Indian 
Chief's squaw, is finally rescued and tries to resume 
life with husband. 

12 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda, Lee J Cobb Jack 
Warden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sidney 
Lumet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 



U N I VERSA L- 1 NT' L 



October 

PILLARS OF THE SKY Technicolor. Jeff Chandler, 
Dorothy Malone, Ward Bond. Producer Robert Arthur 
Director George Marshall. Drama. The spirit of Religion 
helps to settle war bewteen Indians and Cavalrymen 
in the Oregon Country. 95 min. 9/3. 

November 

UNGUARDED MOMENT. THE Technicolor. Esther Wil- 
liams, George Nade.\ Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Drama. High school teacher is almost 
criminally assaulted by student. 95 min. 9/3. 

December 

CURCU. BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
Bromfield, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay, 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siodmak. Horror. Young 
woman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
are terrorized by mysterious jungle beast. 
EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
Maureen O'Hara, John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
dent gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 11/12. 
MOLE PEOPLE. THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror. 
Scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 

January 

FOUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
George Nader, Julie Adams, Marianne Cook. Producer 
A. Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
85 min. 12/10 

ROCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo, John Saxon, Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
Bartlett. Musical. Rock n' roll story of college combo. 
89 min. 11/24. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
Lauren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
smith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
violent death because of jealousy for wife. 99 min. 10/1 

February 

GREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
rer. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
idol. 92 min. 1 1/24. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope, Technicolor. Errol Flynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 84 min. 1/21. 

NIGHT RUNNER. THE Ray Danton, Colleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Biberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 

March 

BATTLE HYMN Technicolor, CinemaScope. Rock Hud- 
son, Martha Hyer, Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. 
Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of 
guilt because of bombing of an orphanage by saving 
other orphans. 108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD astman Color, CinemaScope. 
Fred MacMurray, Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Abner Biberman. Wes- 
tern. Three brothers run a cattle ranch after death of 
their father. 88 min. 1/7. 

MISTER CORY Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford. Producer 
Robert Arthur. Director Blake Edwards. Drama. Gam- 
bler from Chicago slums climbs to wealth and re- 
spectability. 92 min. 1/21. 

Coming 

INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, THE Grant Williams, 
Randy Stuart. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack 
Arnold. Science-fiction. The story of a man whose 
growth processes have accidently been reversed. 
81 min. 2/4. 

INTERLUDE Technicolor, CinemaScope. June Allyson, 
Rossano Brazzi. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. American doctor falls in love with wife of fa- 
mous composer in Munich. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy, George Nader, Keenan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. Story of 
American newsmen in Tokyo after Japanese surrender. 



KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son, Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of dog- 
act in show business in the early 1930 s 2/4. 
MAN AFRAID CinemaScope. George Nader. Phyllis 
Thaxter. Tim Hovey. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Father saves life of man attempting to 
murder his s^n. 

TAMMY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds. 
Leslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Rosenb'.m Director 
Joe Pevnev. Story of a young girl, her grandfather and 
a young man who falls in love with her. 09 min. 
TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arnold. Famous criminal lawyer gains 
humility when put on trial himself. 



WARNER BROTHERS 



October 

TOWARD THE UNKNOWN WarnerColor. William Hol- 
den, Lloyd Nolan, Virginia Leith. Producer-director 
Mervyn LeRoy. Drama. Test pilots experiment in jet 
and rocket propelled aircraft to probe outer space 
and physical limits of man. 115 min. 10/1. 

November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson, 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil. cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND, THE Tab Hunter, Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler Drama. Army turns immature boy into man. 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BABY DOLL Karl Maiden, Carroll Baker, Eli Wallach 
A Newton Production. Producer-director Elia Kazan 
Drama. Story of a gin-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. 114 min. 12/24. 

January 

WRONG MAN. THE Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony 
Quayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club is prime suspect in 
murder case. 105 min. 1/7. 

February 

BIG LAND, THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd, Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move their herds to 
distant railroads. 93 min. 2/4. 

TOP SECRET AFFAIR Kirk Douglas. Susan Hayward. 
Producer Martin Rackin. Director H. C. Potter. Come- 
dy A lovely lady calls the bluff of an Army General. 
93 min. 2/4. 

March 

PARIS DOES STRANGE THINGS Technicolor. Ingrid 
Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco-London 
Rim. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of the exiled 
widow of a Polish Prince. 

Coming 

A FACE IN THE CROWD Andy Griffith. Patricia Neal. 
Producer-director Elia Kazan. Drama. 
LAFAYETTE ESCADRILLE CinemaScope. WarnerColor 
Tab Hunter, Etchika Choureau. J. Carrol Naish. Drama. 
PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL, THE Color Marilyn 
Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Dame Sybil Thorndyke. 
Producer-director Laurence Olivier. Comedy. 
SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS. THE CinemaScope, Warner- 
Color. James Stewart, Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director Billy Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlantic in a plane. 
UNTAMED YOUTH Mamie Van Doren. 



To Better Serve You . . . 

Office It Terminal Combined At 
305 N. 12th St. New Phonet 

Philadelphia 7, Pa. LOmbard 3-3944, 3945 

NEW JERSEY 
MESSENGER SERVICE 

Member National Film Carriers 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE! 

HIGHWAY 
EXPRESS LINES, INC. 

Member .\ational Film Carriers 

Philadelphia, Pa.: LOcust 4-345B 
Washington, D. C: DUpont 7-7200 



BULLETIN— THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



I 




EVERY GUY IN TOWN 
KNEW THE DAME IN THE 
TATTERED DRESS! 



She was as 
cheap as she 
was rich and 
as pretty as 
she was vicious 
and now she 
stood there 
giggling at the 
body in the 
street. Was it 
Murder—or the 



Unwritten Law 



... or was it a 
town's hidden 
evil showing 
through a wo- 
man's tattered 
dress? 



JEFF CHANDLER 
JEANNE CRAIN 
JACK CARSON 
GAIL RUSSELL 

ELAINE STEWART 




'The 

(altered Dress 

DnemaScopE 

fi» GEORGE TOBIAS • EDWARD ANDREWS • PHILIP REED 



JACK ARNOLD • written by GEORGE ZUCKERMAN • produced by ALBERT ZUGSMITH • A UNIVERSAL- INTERNATIONAL PICTURE jA 



FROM U-l THE EXCITING COMPANY 




BULLETIN 




ARCH 4, 1957 



iusiness-wise 
Analysis of 
he New Films 



3E3EQIKSE 

RIT OF ST. LOUIS 

Other Reviews: 

DOES STRANGE THINGS 

MEN! OH, WOMEN! 

12 ANGRY MEN 

LIZZIE 

THE SHADOW 
ON THE WINDOW 

HE TATTERED DRESS 

ESIGNING WOMAN 

THE WOMEN 
>F PITCAIRN ISLAND 



LOEWS STOCKHOLDERS WON OVER 



They Loved Joe Vogel! 



See Pages 6 & 7 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE IV 



THE OLDER GENERATION 




Tjiank you, exhibitors everywhere, members of the press, and our frienc 
throughout the amusement world, for your spontaneous response and enthusiasm, as yo j 
join with us in our happiest celebration - dedicated to the fifteen years of unstintin 
and unlimited vision, inspiration and loyalty we have enjoyed under the leadership c 
Spyros P. Skouras. 

We are deeply moved and gratified by the requests of exhibitors large and sma 
— from the head of the largest circuit to the owner of the smallest theatre— to participat 
in the celebration from March 24th to May 4th. 

This recognition of a selfless dedication to the highest principles and purpose 
of the entertainment world warms the heart of each one of us in the hard-workini 
forward-thinking 20th Century-Fox family. We try as an organization to live up to th 
spirit set by our President. 

. i 



TO MAY 4th 





our President 



Now we re-dedicate our efforts to make the most of the best pictures in our entire 
story, to deal fairly with you and with the public to the best of our ability. This is the 
le way in which we can best honor Spyros P. Skouras : to make your playing time more 
rosperous, your present and future more secure. 




'Get ready! 
Get set!" 




M-G M's BIG PLANS 
FOR DESIGNING 
WOMAN"! 



"DESIGNING WOMAN" is in the BIG MONEY class of "High Society" and "Teahouse of the August 
Moon." Until you see it for yourself, you simply can't know the box-office dynamite in its explosive fun, its 
high- voltage entertainment. We've seen it! We know and we're telling America! We're spending a young 
fortune for you as follows: 

FULL PAGES IN TOP NATIONAL MAGAZINES: Life, Look, Saturday Evening Post, Vogue, Seventeen, 
Charm . FAN MAGAZINES: The entire field . M-G-M's COLUMNS: Famed "Picture Of The Month" and 
"Lion's Roar" covering leading national magazines • NEWSPAPERS: Advance teasers. Special ads. A big 
campaign . TV AND RADIO SPOTS: Special ideas to make the air- waves sizzle . AND MORE: Watch the 
Trade Press for details. 



THE STORY: 
A de luxe doll J| 
steals a two-fisted 
newspaper guy from 
a shapely showgirl 
hi the Comedy 
of the Year — 



GREGORY PECK 
V ^ LAUREN BACALL 

DESIGNING 
WOMAN 

Co- Starring 

DOLORES GRAY 




M-G-M presents the Box-office Bombshell! 



Written by 

GEORGE WELLS 

Associate Producer 



.„ CINEMASCOPE and METROCOLOR 



Directed by 

VINCENTE MINNELLI 

Produced by 

DORE SCHARY 



(Available in Magnetic Stereophonic, 
Perspecta Stereophonic or 1-Channel Sound) 



viewpoints 

MARCH 4, 1957 * VOLUME 25, NO. 5 



We Need Mare "Movie Talk " 



Word-of-mouth, that one-time 
super salesman for movies, is very 
nearly as dead as the dodo, accord- 
ing to revelations made recently by 
statistician Albert Sindlinger. 
Should the impact of this disclosure 
be lost upon the reader, he has only 
to relate the decline in popular ar- 
ticulation with the corresponding de- 
cline in movie ticket sales. The two 
elements appear to run in a fright- 
eningly similar ratio. When the 
public "talked" movies the public 
went to the movies ; when its verba- 
lizing tapered off, attendance did 
likewise. 

The point, then, that the subject 
of movies is occupying a diminish- 
ing place in the conversation of 
pleasure-seeking Americans is no 
frivolous issue. The entire question 
poses serious fiscal considerations. 
Mr. Sindlinger observes that as long 
as four weeks may pass today before 
40% of the population gets the word 
on a good feature film. Contrast this 
with the pre-TV era when like gos- 
sip radiated to 60% of the masses in 
72 hours or less. During the war 
years when word-of-mouth ran its 
most vocal course, 62% of the nation 
were classified as "frequent movie- 
goers" ; in today's no-talk climate 
frequent moviegoers have shrivelled 
to 19.6%. 

It is not surprising that TV has 
usurped much of the chit-chat which 
once formerly belonged to movies. 
Evidence of this derives from the 
additional Sindlinger finding that a 
mere 30% now read the amusement 
page of newspapers as against 70% 
video readership. In the good old 
days, the movie page commandeered 
a 65% reading audience. 

From a dollar viewpoint, word-of- 
mouth shrinkage strikes the indus- 
try in this fashion. A worthy film 
such as "Friendly Persuasion" must 
endure a needlessly long verbal in- 
cubation period before favorable 



mouth reaction gathers a full head 
of steam. By this time, the potential 
may have been largely dissipated. 
The film is nearing the end of the 
sub-runs or is out of the market 
completely. Such is the case history 
of the aforementioned picture and 
many of comparable quality. You 
can see, in the final analysis, how 
little the professional critics count. 

The most practical antidote avail- 
able to the industry involves more 
judicious timing in the exploitation 
and promotion of films. Merchan- 
dising and advertising chieftans 
must lower the boom sooner than 
ever, allow ample time to rouse pub- 
lic expression and permit their vari- 
ous stimuli to ferment. 

Two cases in point are "Giant" 
and "Around the World in 80 Days", 
each of which was the beneficiary of 
generous publicity, paid and unpaid, 
far in advance of its release date. 
Each has been scoring notably at 
the boxoffice. 

In many ways, a constricting 
word-of-mouth is the unwanted off- 
shoot of the product shortage. Con- 
fronted with a thinning inventory, 
distributors are compelled to rush 
many a film pell-mell into release 
without sufficient build-up. Such a 
condition impedes the creation of 
more effective timing machinery. 
But the industry must ponder the 
truth that an uninformed public is 
an uninterested public. Today the 



7Z^ 

BULLETIN 



Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trad* Paper 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax, Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 123? Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa.. LOcust 8-0950. 0951. 
Philip R. Ward, Associate Editor; Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan G. 
Steck, Business Manager; Marvin Schiller, 
Publication Manager; Robert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: S22 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 36, N. Y., MUrray Hill 2-3431; 
Alf Dinhofer, Editorial Representative. 
Subscription Rates: ONE YEAR. S3. 00 
in the U. S.J Canada, S4.00; Europe, 
S5.00. TWO YEARS: S3. 00 in the 
U. S.; Canada, $7.50; Europe, SI. 00. 



public is illiterate moviewise. It 
lacks the vital information to render 
a ticket-purchasing judgment. 

The urgent consideration is not so 
much for additional publicity as it is 
for more appropriate use of existing 
publicity more selectively scheduled. 
This involves no increases in bud- 
get; indeed, may eventually effect 
economies. For the industry fre- 
quently makes better capital of the 
gratuitous promotion it receives 
than that for which it pays. The 
idea is to convince the more im- 
portant media of communication, 
newspapers, TV, radio and others, 
of the newsworthiness of filmdom's 
affairs and its product. This is a job 
that can be accomplished only as a 
combined industry project — by film 
and theatre showmen working from 
a master promotional blueprint. 

So long as filmdom keeps a secret 
of itself it can hardly hope to pros- 
per. Movies must be put back where 
they belong: on the tongues of 
speaking Americans. 

Hvlp Our Own 

The Foundation of the Motion 
Picture Pioneers has quietly pur- 
sued its job of lending a helping 
hand to unfortunate veterans of the 
movie industry, who, because of bad 
breaks, find themselves in need. The 
job has grown heavier with each 
passing year, placing an unprece- 
dented tax on the modest fund with 
which it has to work. 

Ned E. Depinet, newly elected 
president of the Motion Picture 
Pioneers, has issued a sentient ap- 
peal for contributions to the Foun- 
dation in memory of his predecessor, 
the late Jack Cohn, so that it may 
carry on its estimable work. Our in- 
dustry, so quick to extend aid to 
every charity that asks it, can hard- 
ly do less for men in its own family 
who have given the better part of 
their lives to this business. 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 5 



LION'S STOCKHOLDERS LICKED HIS HAND 
They Loved Joe Vogel! 

By LEONARD COULTER 



There was a line of 18 lovely girls seated at a long table 
in the lobby of Loew's State — obviously hand-picked from 
the company's office staff and worthy, many of them, of 
the Culver City sound stages. 

They were there to check off the names of Loew's stock- 
holders attending the annual meeting and to make sure 
there was no repetition of 1956's gatecrashing when, lured 
by the prospect of a box luncheon and a free screening 
after the pow-wow, numerous Broadwayites joined the 
proceedings uninvited and enjoyed an extremely lively 
show. 

Ten minutes after the scheduled time, newly-elected 
President Joseph R. Vogel got the meeting under way in a 
ten minute speech which he read with only a few minor 
changes from the prepared text. 

Whereas last year's meeting was jammed and the com- 
pany's then President, Mr. Arthur M. Loew, was obliged 
to listen to an avalanche of criticism of Loew's past man- 
agement, this year's drew a fair-to-middlin' audience, no 
really awkward questions, no abuse. It was an orderly, 
rather amusing, occasion. 

The reasons for the change were undoubtedly the knowl- 
edge among the rank-and-file stockholders that the new 
all-businessmen slate of directors nominated for election 
was in an unassailable position, and the very obvious fact 
that Mr. Vogel, after only four months in office, was in 
complete command of the situation and determined not to 
permit himself to be harried. 

He Was Well Prepared 

The degree of planning and preparation which had gone 
on behind the scenes prior to the meeting was evidenced, 
for instance, when Lewis Gilbert, self-appointed "champion 
of the little stockholder", began baiting the hook. 

Rising to a round of applause, Mr. Gilbert opened the 
question period, and announced, "I am seriously concerned 
over the fact that only one member of the management is 
sitting on the Board." 

Joe Vogel permitted himself to smile briefly, answering: 
"Mr. Gilbert — we anticipated this question, so I already 
have the answer written down : We will have at our beck 
and call all the executive skills and talents of the com- 
pany's personnel." 

The audience laughed at this gentle sally, and from that 
moment the meeting swung towards Mr. Vogel. Indeed, 
it wasn't long before the usually critical Mr. Gilbert was 
himself praising the company's president for his straight- 
forward and admirable answers. 

The "We love Joe Vogel" movement gained added mo- 
mentum the moment he sensed that the stockholders en- 
joyed hearing him say. "Our decisions will be governed 




JOSEPH R. VOGEL 



only by the factor of whether this or that will make money 
for the company." 

He delivered numerous variations of this theme, draw- 
ing handclaps from those who, having come to bury 
Caesar, stayed to praise him. Gently affirmative, he 
clinched the mood of the meeting by announcing firmly, to 
one small stockholder who wanted to know why he hadn't 
seen "Gone With the Wind" on TV: "You say we keep 
'Gone With the Wind' in mothballs. On the contrary, we 
keep it in a locked safe, under heavy guard. It is a very 
valuable property, and we will never sell it to television. 
Every time we release the picture we take in more money 
than we make on quite a few of the other pictures we put 
out duripg the year." 

After a couple of hours, Mr. Vogel lit a cigarette, then 
another, then a third. He was beginning to feel so much at 
home that when he made a small technical error he grinned 
and said, "You can see I'm not very experienced in this 
sort of thing." 

Answers Direct- 
He was modest, patient, unassuming, but never apolo- 
getic. He permitted everyone to have their say and his 
replies were never complex or elaborate. For instance: 

Asked about discussions now proceeding for a merger 
of studio facilities between MGM and Twentieth Century- 
Fox: "This is far from consummated . . ." 

(Continued on Page IX) 



Page 6 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



V 




By Philip R. Ward 



PRIDE REBORN. The most reliable forecast issued at 
the 38th annual gathering of Loew's equity-owing clan 
may have fallen to a mildly lisping shareholder, who as- 
sured president Joseph Vogel : "If you don't have ulcers 
now, you will next year." 

We wish him a happier medical future. He deserves 
better, as measured by his impressive rendering of per- 
sonal credentials before a tight-lipped audience of unrecon- 
structed shareholders and expectant members of the press. 

Thanks to Mr. Vogel, the only affront his listeners were 
to suffer all day occurred outside Loew's State in the 
chilled February air of Broadway before the 10 AM meet- 
ing even began. There, in the outer lobby was a sign an- 
nouncing, cocksuredly, that the theatre would open at 12 
noon. Someone, it seemed, was mighty confident of the 
script. 

It did not take Mr. Vogel long to remedy this breech of 
good taste as well as other breeches of less recent vintage. 
His mental antenna working overtime, the Loew's presi- 
dent made rapid accomodation to the radio signals flashing 
from his audience. ". . . In business to make profits . . ." 
soon became a stock Vogel transcription. 

His indulgence of the bumptious, the buffoons and the 
ill-advised, who seem inevitably to arise at Loew's meet- 
ings, struck this observer as commendable. Loew's share- 
holders show a curious calendar disorientation. One, look- 
ing for all the world like a Big Ten Ail-American with 
Brandoesque overtones of speech, demanded the number of 
Loew's shares outstanding "as of July 1 1, 1957". Another 
queried the number of new films to be produced "this year 
and the year before". At no time did Mr. Vogel betray the 
noblesse oblige so characteristic of some industry leaders. 
At the same time, he showed little stomach for aimless 
controversy. H e turned off such questions with a summary 
"thank you" and searched for the next upraised hand. 

It is possible that Mr. Vogel endeared himself more to 
stockholders than to officeholders. He indicated harshly 
that no one will remain in the organization unless he is 
doing a job. Another manifestation of the Vogel candor 
resulted when the company auditor proved something less 
than loquacious in offering a breakdown of film company 
vs. theatre company earnings. When the maundering 
answer finally came, Mr. Vogel was quick to assure his 
audience the film company loss was "much, much more" 
than the "above $250,000" figure offered. At an earlier 
moment his features betrayed annoyance when several di- 



rectors found it expedient to be absent at a roll-call intro- 
duction. It was on all counts a virtuoso performance. 

O 

In jockeying for shareholder acceptance, president Vogel 
deemed it politic to dislocate himself, subtly, artfully, from 
connection with prior company heads. He appeared sad- 
dened by the needless post-mortems in which the bodies of 
Dore Shary and Nicholas Schenck were served up as burnt 
offerings. But he remained properly inarticulate. The im- 
pression is that Mr. Vogel is something of a loner in man- 
agement circles. This is as it should be, for his is the 
broom-sweeping job. Board of director-wise, there is criti- 
cism of his status as sole management representative. En- 
lightened opinion, however, believes he can range with 
greater mobility in the interim at least. Once the internal 
reforms take place, it is then incumbent upon Mr. Vogel 
to press for more management directorships. At the mo- 
ment he seems hardly displeased with the situation. Some 
feel former foe Joe Tomlinson may, surprisingly prove 
Vogel's champion when the board meeting chips are down. 

Joseph Vogel is a hard money man. His operational 
philosophy includes the exploitation of TV leasing deals 
(credit for which properly goes to former president Arthur 
Loew), vast increases in participation programs with top 
talent, production of films for the "masses not classes" 
and fewer but better films. The so-called "prestige" film 
associated with Dore Shary will not find a niche under Mr. 
Vogel. As he stated in defending his $3,000 weekly salary: 
"Most of this is taxable. I must look, like you, to my stock 
for profits." Mr. Vogel has his own concept about profit- 
able pictures. 

0 

As for the newly elected board, there can be no gain- 
saying its stature. But as a body given to purely opera- 
tional questions, it may prove more decorative than func- 
tional. In this vein, Mr. Vogel bears a groaning burden. 
His is the task of steering, orienting, counseling — all with 
an eye on the practical pulse of things. Concerning non- 
operational matters, the composition of the board glows 
more brightly. In such areas as capital gains ventures, ac- 
quisitions, financial promotion, it is without peer in the 
movie industry. Indeed, the very constituency of the 
board, which includes among its members three former 
secretaries of the armed forces, gave rise to the quip by 
one newspaper wag that Loew's is "better prepared to 
weather a Third World War than any corporate entity in 
the nation". Lacking all else, they could garner income for 
Loew's hiring out as consultants to the Pentagon. But in 
the end it is the new company president who must wage 

(Continued on Page 18) 



Film BULLETIN March 4. 1957 Pag 5 7 



llWHAT PRICE ROCK 'N' ROLL? The rock 'n' roll 
I phenomenon, as everyone knows, is making its impact felt 
on movie business, just as it is on every phase of life in 
America. Theatres here and there report record-smashing 
[ (and seat-smashing) business on various rock 'n' roll films. 
I The riotous response to the rocking stage and movie 
("Don't Knock the Rock") show at the New York Para- 
mount, when thousands of teen-age addicts turned out to 
I jam the streets, highlighted the b.o. potential — and, at the 
j same time, the dangers — of this kind of entertainment. 
J Some keen industry observers will tell you in no uncertain 
J terms that the aftermath of such demonstrations will be 
bitter for the theatre. They question pertinently what the 
reactions of adult moviegoers might be to the wild antics 
of the leather jacket set. One veteran theatreman said he 
would not run a rock n' roll picture regardless of the busi- 
ness it might do, "because it would take me months to 
entice my regular adult audience back into the theatre". 
He spoke from experience: the engagement of a rock 'n' 
roller in one of his houses brought a record-breaking audi- 
I ence, plus a large contingent of cops to clear out the rough- 
necks — who thanked him by tossing a brick through the 
windshield of his car parked out front. And business 
dipped for several weeks afterward. In Philadelphia the 
parents of a 14-year-old boy recently filed suit against 
Stanley Warner for injuries the youth suffered as the re- 
sult of "acts of violence, frenzy, savagery, undue excite- 
ment and criminal and immoral conduct" (the complaint 
states) by the audience during the showing of a rock 'n' 
roll movie. The theatre is charged with negligence in fail- 
ing to provide adequate police protection and in admitting 
those "whom they knew or had reason to know would be- 
come aroused". The claim is for $40,000. Truly, what price 
rock 'n' roll? 

0 

ARE REISSUES DEAD? The feeling is growing in the 
trade that showings of old features on TV has sunk the 
whole reissue market. Until the major film libraries went 
on the air there was always a steady demand for repeat 
theatre showings of old movie classics, but the public re- 
action to any such offerings now seems to be: "Oh, it'll be 
on TV soon" — so why go out to see it. A few weeks ago 
the reissue of "Casablanca" met with surprising response, 
and distributors of Dominant Pictures (they are handling 
the Warner Bros, oldies) got a flock of fast bookings. But 
the reason, it now seems, was the coincidence of Hum- 
p u rey Bogart's death and Ingrid Bergman's return to the 
U.S. to accept the New York Critics "best acrtess" award. 
All that publicity gave the picture a shot in the arm — but 
it was very temporary. When the Bogart-Bergman names 
disappeared from the front pages "Casablanca'' had no 
"legs to stand on". 

0 

PARAMOUNT LIBRARY. Look for Paramount to give 
the word soon on the sale of its complete pre-1948 feature 
library to TV. Despite the vehement denials from both 



Mat They're hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



the film company and Columbia Broadcasting, insiders ex- 
press no doubt that the deal will be finalized any day. A 
number of factors are noted as adding to the logic of the 
transaction at this time. From the standpoint of the broad- 
casting company, there is the great desire to acquire a top- 
Bight film library to cash in on the surprising audience re- 
sponse to old movies. Thus far, aside from a fling at offer- 
ing British oldies (and an occasional new one) on Sunday 
nights, none of the networks has tried movies on Class-A 
time. CBS might be the first network to use films on prime 
TV time. For its part, Paramount would like to show 
revenue from a sale to TV on this year's financial state- 
ment. The gigantic costs of biggies like "The Ten Com- 
mandments" and "War and Peace" will take quite a while 
to recoup, and a nice fat take on fully amortized oldies can 
make the company's financial picture look bright indeed. 
President Barney Balaban can be credited with being a 
shrewd operator, in that he waited for the right moment to 
make the deal; the value of feature films to TV is prob- 
ably at its peak at this moment and he will be getting the 
top dollar for his product. 

0 

ZANUCK & HUGHES. Much is being read into Darryl 
Zanuck's sudden resignation from the 20th Century-Fox 
board of directors within a few weeks after he accepted 
election. It is being implied that his exit is in some way 
associated with reports that Howard Hughes has become 
a heavy buyer of 20th stock. The suspicion exists in some 
quarters that an alliance between Zanuck and Hughes 
might be in the wind. To the contrary, we hear that some 
friction has developed recently between the two. 

0 

NEW TALENT. With all the other problems pressing in 
on them, the major film studios are more disturbed than 
ever about the lack of new talent. So far, none of the new 
"finds" has succeeded in catching on with the public to 
any appreciable extent. Although each campaign waged to 
bring a new star to the public's attention costs the studios 
thousands of dollars, most of them are continuing then- 
quest for new faces. 20th-Fox has set out on a talent hunt 
for a new leading ingenue for its production of "A Certain 
Smile", French novelist Francoise Sagan's latest best- 
seller. It will comb schools, colleges, dramatic studios. 
Though this is by no means the only solution (Marilyn 
Mcnroe tossed around the studios for several years before 
her big coming out), talent experts believe that students 
offer the best propects of becoming the "stars of tomor- 
row". At any rate, the oldsters who rank as the top pre- 
snt-day marquee names are drying up so fast that every 
studio executive chills at the thought of what another five 
years will bring. 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 9 



'Paris Does Strange Things" 

&i4ute&d Rati*? O © Plus 

Involved, slapstick costume melodrama made in France. 
Talents of Ingrid Bergman, Mel Ferrer wasted on inept 
script, frantic direction. Will suffer by word-of-mouth. 

The talents of Ingrid Bergman and Mel Ferrer are hope- 
lessly submerged in a welter of frantic carryings-on and a 
profusion of lush sets which characterize this inept farce 
made by Jean Renoir. Except for the extraordinary Tech- 
nicolor — the real star of the picture — "Paris" is an embar- 
rassment to Warner Brothers, to Miss Bergman and par- 
ticularly to writer-director Renoir. It is a tiresome, Key- 
stone-cops-like melodrama with endless plot complications, 
frenetic attempts at sight gags, labored bufoonery and such 
confused action impossible to understand the threads of 
story. Director Renoir undoubtedly intended this as Gallic 
wit, but it is all a bore. Miss Bergman is as beautiful and 
as vital as ever, and she and Ferrer do their best to uphold 
the comedy aspects, but to no avail. While the star names 
will attract some early business, word-of-mouth will tear 
it down quickly. Miss Bergman, a Polish princess engaged 
to middle-aged industrialist Pierre Bertin, meets Ferrer, 
who introduces her to Jean Marais, France's soldier hero 
of the moment. Miss Bergman accepts the request of poli- 
ticians to induce Marais to become dictator. Interested in 
Miss Bergman, he plays along. Ferrer realizes he loves 
Miss Bergman and thwarts the politicans. When Miss 
Bergman accepts the love of Ferrer, Marais gives up his 
career and runs away with his old mistress. 

Warner Bros. Uean Renoir) 86 minutes. Ingrid Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. 
Produced and directed by Jean Renoir. 

"Lizzie" 

ScMiteM 'Rati*? O O 

Psychological drama of woman with three personalities. 
Talky, lacks punch. Fair exploitables. Best for class houses. 

This Bryna production for MGM release is a slow-mov- 
ing psychological study. It contains several exploitable 
elements in its unusual theme — that of a woman with three 
distinct personalities. However, the picture just doesn't 
add up to the gripping drama one might expect despite 
fine performances by Eleanor Parker, Richard Boone and 
Joan Blondell. Director Hugo Haas (who also plays a 
supporting role), faced with the dilemma of having to ex- 
plain psychiatry to the uninitiated while retaining the in- 
terest of the "eggheads" has relied to much on talk. Result 
is only low-keped drama which fails to sustain much real 
suspense. The Jerry Bresler production in black-and-white 
is effectively simple. Elizabeth (Eleanor Parker) is a shy, 
isck girl. At her job in a museum, she receives threatening 
notes from someone signed "Lizzie". Her boozing aunt, 
Joan Blondell, believes her to be mentally ill, and Eliza- 
beth is persuaded to see psychiatrist Richard Boone. 
Through hypnosis, he discovers that she has actually three 
distinct personalities: shy "Elizabeth", hard-bitten & sen- 
sual "Lizzie", and normal, friendly "Beth". It is also dis- 
covered that events in her childhood caused her person- 
ality to split three ways. Through a re-living of childhood 
experiences she is led to understand herself better. Each 
personality fights for supremacy, "Beth" is victorious. 

MGM. (Bryna Production). 81 minutes. Eleanor Parker, Richard Boone, Joan Blon- 
dell. Produced by Jerry Bresler. Directed by Hugo Haas. 



"Oh, Men! Dh, Women!" 

Sututeu Rati**} O O Plus 

Metropolitan audiences should go for this lively spoof of 
psychoanalysis. Mild name values, but should benefit by 
word-of-mouth. Strictly for adult audiences. 

A gay, occasionally uproarious, comedy about that breed 
of modern sophisticates whose lives are muddled no enc 
by psychiatry, "Oh, Men! Oh, Women!" should do wel 
in big city houses, not so in the family market. Name 
values are only fair (and the title doesn't figure to be much 
help), but word-of-mouth should help. It's strictly for 
adults. Nunnally Johnson wrote-directed-produced this 
entertaining "battle of the sexes" in CinemaScope and De 
Luxe color for 20th Century-Fox release, and he has 
brought to the movie the good pace, full-bodied treatment 
and feel for comedy that made it a Broadway stage hit 
Performances are gems. Dan Dailey, Ginger Rogers anc 
David Niven were never better. But top honors go to Tony 
Randall, who debuts like a skyrocket in the role of a neu- 
rotic in love with sweet-faced Barbara Rush. Psychoana 
lyst Niven learns that patient Randall is upset over the 
recent break-up of his romance with Niven's fiancee, Miss 
Rush. He learns from patient Miss Rogers that her actor- 
husband, Dailey, also courted Miss Rush. When Nivon 
confronts Miss Rush concerning these men, Dailey arrives 
drunk and starts to make passes at her. Aboard the 
ship on which they had planned to honeymoon, where each 
had gone to remove their luggage, Niven and his fiancee 
argue while the ship sails off. Unable to handle his irra- 
tional sweetheart any other way, the unhappy psychiatrist 
just knuckles under, a victim of his own confusion.. 

20th Century-Fox. 90 minutes. Dan Dailey, Ginger Rogers, David Niven, Barbara 
Rush, Tony Randall. Produced and directed by Nunnally Johnson. 

"The Women of Pitcairn Island" 

'ScuiKCM Rati*? O Plus 

Low-budget South Seas adventure. Supporting dualler. 

Obviously made on a low budget, this Wisberg-Yar- 
brough production for 20th Century-Fox release will ap- 
peal only to those who enjoy South Seas settings and girls 
in sarongs. For those who are sensitive to amateurish 
scripting and poor acting, it will be hard to take. Note it 
only as a supporting filler. The black and white Regalscope 
lens accentuates the film's flatness, the artificial back- 
ground atmosphere. James Craig and Lynn Bari furnish 
tepid name value to the shallow yarn about an island 
colony of the widows of the mutineers depicted in the film 
"Mutiny on the Bounty". Director Jean Yarbrough evokes 
some excitement in the sequence in which shipwrecked 
pirates, led by Craig, attempt to plunder the island. 
Widows of Pitcairn Island, led by Miss Bari, are fright- 
ened when Craig and his band of cutthroat pirates are 
washed ashore. The pirates seek House Peters, Jr., who j 
made off with their bag of black pearls. Peters is killed by 
a boar while burying the treasure, and the natives recover l 
it. Craig and his men discover the village and endeavor to 
take over. The women and their teen-age sons barricade 
themselves behind a stockade and repulse all attacks. Lynn ■ 
uses the pearls to pit the pirates against themselves, and 
they greedily double-cross and kill each other. 

20th Century-Fox. |A Wisberg-Yarbrough Production). 72 minutes. James Craig, 
Lynn Bari, John Smith. Directed by Jean Yarbrough. 



[More REVIEWS on Page 12] 

Page 10 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



"Spirit of St. Louis" Vivid, Exciting Record of Lindberg Flight 



Scautete RoUtf GOO 

First-class biographical story of first trans-Atlantic solo 
flight. Beautifully mounted production by Leland Hayward, 
superb direction by Billy Wilder. Fine performance by James 
Stewart as "Lindy". Needs strong exploitation to realize its 
grossing potential. 

The Leland Hayward-Billy Wilder production based on 
Charles A. Lindberg's epochal non-stop New York-to- 
Paris solo flight certainly ranks among the season's dis- 
tinguished motion pictures. With notable devotion to 
factual detail they have faithfully reproduced the atmos- 
phere of the period and the circumstances surrounding the 
historic event. And, for his part, James Stewart has turned 
in one of the most impressive performances as the shy but 
determined "Lindy". 

"The Spirit of St. Louis" cannot, however, be chalked 
up as a sure-fire boxoffice success. Interest should be in- 
tense among the generation that was around in 1927 to 
share the thrill of the daring exploit of young "Slim". It 
should not be too difficult to bestir a nostalgic want-to-see 
in that element. The exhibitor's problem will be twofold : 
to attract the feminine trade, despite the lack of a roman- 
tic angle, and to overcome the likely disinterest of the teen- 
age set in a historical. Warner Bros, boxofficers have indi- 
cated their awareness of the latter problem by employing 
the youth-appeal of Tab Hunter, who is currently touring 
on behalf of "Spirit". Word-of-mouth response should be 
warm for the picture, and grosses generally should run 
well above average. 

Director Wilder has superbly documented the gruelling 
3600-mile flight through alert CinemaScope-WarnerColor 
cameras that make a visual treat of the plane's check points 
enroute. And, as the lonely young flier fights his worst 
enemy — sleep — during the 33^-hour trip, the screen is 
kept awake with interesting flashbacks depicting his color- 
ful career as a pioneer airmail pilot and as an air-circus 
barnstormer, his struggle to win backing for the flight and 
to obtain the kind of a monoplane he wanted. Wilder's 




On that historic morning. May 20, 1927, "Lindy" arrives at Roosevelt 
Field, I\'ew York, approaches his monoplane, "The Spirit of St. Louis". 




At the controls, Lindberg fights sleep. 



directorial ingenuity is vividly evident in the way he blends 
these flashbacks without impeding the mounting suspense 
in progress of the flight. Wilder also collaborated on the 
screenplay with Wendell Mayes and Charles Lederer, the 
story based on Lindberg's Pulitzer Prize-winning book. 

Stewart is thoroughly believable as the lanky, boyish, 
introspective iron-nerved "Lindy", an ideal choice (despite 
his age). In minor roles are Murray Hamilton as a fellow 
barnstormer and close friend, and Patricia Smith as the girl 
who lends Stewart a pocket mirror for better cockpit 
vision. Bartlett Robinson and Arthur Space design and 
build the famous craft. Marc Connelly turns in a humor- 
ous bit-performance as minister and student pilot. 

Robert Burks' photography, particularly the aerial shots, 
blends beautifully with the soundtrack score composed and 
conducted by Franz Waxman. 

To win a $25,000 prize, Stewart interests St. Louis busi- 
nessman Charles Watts and his associates in financing a 
craft to fly the Atlantic non-stop. Robinson and Space de- 
sign and build the "Spirit of St. Louis" in three months 
while the businessmen try to talk Stewart out of making 
the dangerous flight. He takes off from Long Island on a 
misty May morning in 1927, despite a muddy field. Flying 
blind over the Atlantic Stewart is plagued with ice that 
forms on the wing-tips, and navigation problems. At dawn 
he fails asleep at the controls and the plane almost crashes. 
To keep awake he thinks about his carefree barnstorming 
days with a flying circus, his dangerous work as a pioneer 
air-mail carrier, and career as an Army Air Corps cadet. 
His final problem is locating the airfield outside of Paris in 
the dark. He lands completely fatigued and is torn from 
the cockpit by thousands of cheering Frenchmen. 

Warner Bros. IA Leland Hayward-Billy Wilder Productionl. 138 minutes James 
Stewart, Murray Hamilton, Patricia Smith, Bartlett Robinson, Marc Connelly, Ar- 
thur Space. Produced by Leland Hayward. Directed by Billy Wilder. Screenplay by 
Billy Wilder and Wendell Mayes. Basde on the book by Charles A. Lindbergh. 
Photography directed by Robert Burks. Music composed and conducted by Franz 
Waxman. Aerial supervisors, Paul Mantz and J. Peverell Marley, A.S.C. 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 11 



"12 Angry Men" 

Scuute&x ^<Ui*u? O O Plus 

Taut, dynamic jury-room drama. Memorable direction and 
acting. For class houses, exploitable for general market. 

Reginald Rose has adapted his own TV drama for the 
screen in co-production with Henry Fonda who also stars 
in this unique and exceptionally engrossing jury-room 
drama. "12 Angry Men" demonstrates that a potent story, 
well acted and directed, can hold an audience for 95 
minutes, though the action takes place in a single room. 
Mature audiences will welcome this United Artists release, 
while class situations will find its b.o. potential far above 
average. Sidney Lumet, directing his first film, shows great 
promise, utilizing his experience with TV's limited scope 
to give the movie plenty of movement. There is always 
the feeling that the drama is taking place, not merely being 
enacted. The lines ring true. Fonda turns in a fine per- 
formance backed with articulate characterizations by Lee 
J. Cobb, Ed Begley, E. G. Marshall, Jack Warden. Boris 
Kaufman's photography, and all the technical aspects of 
the film, are excellent. First vote by the jury in a first 
degree murder is 11 to one for conviction, only Fonda hold- 
ing out. (The defendent is a slum-bred teenager accused 
of knifing his father.) Fonda wants to talk about the case, 
and Cobb grudgingly agrees to review the evidence. As 
they dissect the evidence, the jurors reverse their votes be- 
cause "reasonable doubt" arises as to the boy's guilt. Cobb, 
Begley and Warden hold out for conviction until their own 
comments and reflections prove them personally preju- 
diced. Final vote is a unanimous "not guilty". 

United Artists. (An Orion-Nova Production). ?5 minutes. Henry Fonda, Lee J. 
Cobb, Ed Begley. Produced by Henry Fonda and Reginald Rose. Directed by 
Sidney Lumet. 

"The Tattered Dress" 

Scituteu 'Rati*? O O 

Fairly hard-hitting meller about a slick criminal lawyer. Well- 
balanced cast. Exploitable in action-ballyhoo situations. 

This program melodrama from Universal-International 
is about an arrogant trial lawyer who is victim of his own 
machinations. Produced by Albert Zugsmith and written 
by George Zuckerman, who teamed up for "Written on the 
Wind", "The Tattered Dress" is filmed in black-and-white 
CinemaScope. The pace is very fast, the plot thin and 
sketchy, but hard-hitting. Under Jack Arnold's direction, 
the treatment ranges from high realism to shallow soap- 
opera. Appeal figures to be strongest for patrons of the 
action-ballyhoo houses. The title can be exploited to draw 
the curious. Chandler defends Philip Reed who mur- 
dered a man having an affair with his wife, Miss Stewart. 
By confusing sheriff Carson on the stand, Chandler sways 
the jury and Reed goes free. Carson, enraged, frames 
Chandler on charges of bribing juror Gail Russell, Car- 
son's sweetheart. Chandler attempts to defend himself in 
court. When Miss Russell faints on stand due to Chand- 
ler's harassment, his case seems lost, but he sums up with 
a strong plea for justice, which he admits he often abused, 
winning a not guilty verdict. Maddened with hatred, Car- 
son is shot by Miss Russell, whom he had double-crossed. 

Universal-International. 94 minutes. Jeff Chandler, Jeanne Crain, Jack Carson. Pro- 
duced by Albert Zugsmith. Directed by Jack Arnold. 



"Designing Woman" 

Su4uce4d IZcUiH? O O Plus 

Happy comedy-romance with songs, stars Gregory Peck an. 
Lauren Bacall. Bright production, good fun. Above-averag 
attraction in urban markets; n.s.g. for small towns. 

Dore Schary has delivered a bright CinemaScope-Metro 
color production for M-G-M in this lovebirds-at-war come 
dy, with incidental songs and dances tossed in for addec 
pace. "Designing Woman" will appeal to the wide ge 
eral run of audiences who want glamour, romance, lots 
laughs, and a buoyant story. Its draw will be much stron 
er in metropolitan markets than in the hinterland. Laur 
Bacall is the clothes-designing woman who weds sports 
writer Gregory Peck and discovers that her eccentric show- 
biz friends don't mix well with his sports crowd. Squash- 
faced Mickey Shaughnessy steals scenes by the dozens 
a punchy ex-pug, and tiny Jack Cole dances with jet-pro 
pelled speed. (Cole also staged the dance numbers.) Di 
rector Vincente Minnelli proceeds rapidly without belabor 
ing the comic situation or striving for credibility. T 
story starts with sports columnist Peck falling in love wi 
Miss Bacall in California and marrying her within t 
week. When they return to New York, Peck discove 
she's a wealthy fashion designer whose assorted sho 
business friends include producer Tom Helmore an 
dancer Cole. Peck's poker-playing pals include editor Le 
vene and ex-fighter Shaughnessy. Dolores Gray, Peck 
old girlfriend, stars in a show for which Lauren is design 
ing costumes. Peck leaves town to hide out from figh 
racketeer Jesse White, whom he's exposing, and when 
goes to Miss Gray's apartment for an "alibi" to give h 
wife, Lauren catches him there. In Boston, when th 
show opens, Dolores explains Peck's innocence, and the 
"designing woman" wins back her husband. 

M-G-M. 117 minutes. Gregory Peck, Lauren Bacall, Dolores Gray. Produced 
Dors Schary. Directed by Vincente Minnelli. 

"The Shadow on the Window" 
Su&utete TRattH? O Pius 

Crime meller only mildly effective despite good perform 
ances. Serviceable supporting feature for action market. 

A routine, modestly budgeted crime melodrama, this 
Columbia offering will serve only as a supporting feature 
in action houses. The competent performances of Phil 
Carey, Betty Garrett, and John Barrymore, Jr., are not 
enough to offset a trite plot about the cop's wife being kid- 
napped and the city combed for clues. Producer Jonie Taps 
uses actual Los Angeles locations for realism. Director 
William Asher maintains a fast pace and developes fair 
tension as the kidnappers fight over the girl. Police ser- 
geant Carey is notifed his son, young Jerry Mathers, was 
picked up wandering in a stupor. Betty Garrett, his es- 
tranged wife, is also missing. Barrymore, Corey Allen, and 
dull-witted Gerald Sarracini hold her captive after murder- 
ing the latter's employer. Mathers, who had witnessed the 
attack, is shocked speechless. Allen returns home for a 
gun and car, and is spotted and shot by Carey. Barrymore 
is about to shoot Miss Garrett, but Sarracini lunges for the 
gun and is killed. Police close in. Family is reunited. 

Columbia. 73 minutes. Phil Carey, Betty Garrett, John Barrymore, Jr. Produced 
by Jonie Taps. Directed by William Asher. 



Page 12 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



PATTERNS DF PATRONAGE 

IV 



CxcluMte '/kt BULLETIN feature 



The Older Generation 



By LEONARD SPINRAD 
J he most striking observation to be made about today's 
oMer people is that there are so many of them. The popu- 
lation of the United States is steadily increasing, not only 
because more babies are being born, but also because so 
many people are living longer. Our senior citizens, to give 
them a name they have not enthusiastically accepted, are 
a growing group — growing in money, in fluence, in buying 
activity, in leisure pursuits, indeed in every possible way 
except one. They don't go to the movies. 

The Census Bureau estimates that in 1955 there were 
about 14,128,000 men and women in the United States who 
were 65 years old or older, a gain of almost 15% in the 
short five years since 1950. In the same few years, the 
number of Americans between the ages of 55 and 64 rose 
more than 10% to a total of 14,529,000. The entire U.S. 
population in this same period did not increase quite as 
much, rising a bit more than 7%. 



THEY DON'T GO TO MOVIES 



Ask your travel agents or the house trailer dealers and 
they will tell you that the new breed of oldsters don't sit 
around the house with shawls on their shoulders. More 
and more of them are living full active lives. But they 
don't go to the movies. 

The latest Alfred Politz Research survey for Look mag- 
azine reports that approximately 1%% of the weekly 
movie audience over the age of ten in September 1956 was 
composed of people past 55. But people past 55 comprise 
more than 22% of the over-ten population. 

It can be argued that older people like to stay put more 
than younger folks. It can also be argued that a higher 
percentage of the oldsters at any given time are ill, en- 
feebled or otherwise incapacitated. By way of compensa- 
tion, however, the older citizens usually have no baby sit- 
ting problems or rigid have-to-get-up-early-in-the-morning 
personal schedules. And they are likely to have more 
money today than used to be available to them. 

A very important point also is that the idea of retirement 
in the middle sixties is changing these days. Industry is 




finding out that older workers are worth keeping. The 
President of the United States was reelected at age 66 and 
the heads of many American businesses are active in their 
seventies. 

The Politz figures on movie attendance are typical of 
various researches into this subject. National Theatres in 
1955 found that only 1% of the patrons in six Los Angeles 
neighborhood houses were over 60. Loew's Theatres sur- 
veys in 1956 were said to have indicated a very low pro- 
portion of older patrons in the New York City moviegoing 
public. 

Late last year the U.S. Department of the Interior made 
a survey of the hunting and fishing public. It reported that 
8% of the total U.S. population over the age of 65 indulged 
in fishing and 3% in hunting at some time in 1955. Cer- 
tainly both these activities can be considered physically 
more demanding that going to the movies. 



CUT-RATE TICKETS SMALL INCENTIVE 



Motion picture theatre managers have been conscious of 
the lack of older patronage. Theatres in such varied places 
as Huntington, W. Va., Plainfield, N. J., Cambridge, Mass. 
and Minneapolis have offered reduced rates or in some in- 
stances even free admissions to the senior generation. They 
have formed Golden Age clubs, lined up the support of 
community service groups, newspapers and city welfare or- 
ganizations. But while a certain degree of success has been 
reported, this does not appear to be the answer to the prob- 
lem. There is no evidence to support the theory that cut- 
ting the ticket price is the major road to an adequate audi- 
ence of oldsters. 

(Continued on Page 14) 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 13 



THE OLDER GENERATION 

What Kintl of Pictures Do They Want? 



(Continued from Page 13) 

Some observers feel that the entertainment offered by 
home television, while not strong enough to keep older 
people from travelling, or even from hunting or playing 
goif, is sufficiently similar to what they can see at the mo- 
tion picture theatre so that there is no incentive to patron- 
ize the boxoffke. There is no evidence, however, to sug- 
gest that other leisure time pursuits are afflicted in like 
manner. 



DO KIDS- DISCOURAGE ELDERS? 



The presence of a plethora of children in a movie audi- 
ence is considered by many managers to be a deterrent to 
older adult patronage. Theatres which consistently avoid 
pictures with juvenile appeal — usually located in high in- 
come areas with a broad adult audience on which to draw 
— have been able to build up a higher level of older cus- 
tomers, but the economics of sacrificing one audience to 
sell another are naturally open to question. 

There seems to be little doubt that more elderly cus- 
tomers value their comfort. They like well-kept theatres 
and well-behaved audiences, as who does not. As regards 
double feature programs versus single bills, they are, at 
least in conversation, often in favor of the singletons ; but 
experience has led many theatre people to support the 
trade maxim that "customers talk single bills but buy 
doubles." 

No tremendous correlation can be established between 
stellar ratings and the older audience. Because they are 
familiar with older stars, patrons along in years are apt to 
buy these stars' films more than those of the Elvis Presley 
genre. On the whole, nevertheless, they are not avid fans 
of particular stars. 

The themes and selling points of motion pictures have 
tremendous importance for the older market. It seems fair 
to presume that a heavy sex sell does not enchant grand- 
parents. This applies more to the stellar personalities than 
to the themes. Senior patrons are not persuaded to see a 
film by the physical charms of a buxom young actress; 
they are persuaded by the perhaps equally spectacular in- 
ducements of a sweeping drama. "The Ten Command- 
ments" and Cinerama, for instance, have done very well 
with older people. During the popularity of 3-D, older pa- 
trons were extremely interested in this new type of spec- 
tacle. 

The serious type of "problem picture" is problematical 
indeed for the older audience. Basically, this age group 
seems to want relaxation rather than thought stimulation ; 
there is no heavy desire to sit in on weighty or disturbing 
problems, and three is a considerable enthusiasm for see- 
ing pictures about nice people. 

That mysterious element called human interest has a 
very strong appeal for the older audience. Stories of color- 
ful real people they know are followed; television appear- 
ances of interesting individuals on behalf of current 




movies, where the connection is immediate, produce highl 
satisfactory word of mouth among the over-age potentia 
patrons. 

In terms of direct sales promotion, there seems to be 
good reason to believe that many of the older generation 
actively resent anything which classifies them in the elder- 
ly category. They don't like to go any place where most of 
the other people are also elderly. This may not seem to be 
an accurate reflection of the success of resorts like St. 
Petersburg, Fla., in attracting older customers; but anyone 
with older people in his family knows that it is the young- 
er folks, not the older ones, who set up the grouping. A 
resort, for example, becomes a hang-out for older people 
because the young ones stop coming when they see how 
many older folks are there. 

Thus there is always the possibility that an all-out ap- 
peal for older patronage at a theatre can harm more than 
it helps, by failing to attract enough older people to make 
up for the younger people it may discourage. 



SPECIAL ADVERTISING APPROACH 



Avenues of advertising and publicity need careful exami- 
nation, as far as the older generation is concerned. It 
seems likely that they read newspapers less and listen to 
television and radio more than their sons and daughters. It 
also seems that, since they are not as burningly interested 
in theatre motion pictures, they need more emphatic and 
vigorous selling than their juniors. And yet, if only be- 
cause at their age they are perhaps more set in their ways, 
they cannot be overpowered. They don't want to hear how 
exciting and how wonderful a picture is, so much as what 
it is about. 

They are, as noted, interested in people. Marilyn Mon- 
roe, as a result of her post-stardom experiences, is far more 
interesting to them now than when she was just a blonde 
wiggle with top billing. The story of Al Jolson appealed to 
them not only because he was a great entertainer but also 
because the story was known interestingly to them. 

Much of the character of the older audience is not 
unique. Older people may be older, but they are still peo- 
ple, and they do not change completely as they accumulate 
birthdays. They still like to make up their own minds. 
Their children and grandchildren may recommend movies 

( Continued on Page 26) 



Page 14 Film BULLETIN March 4. 1957 




SKOURAS 



SPYROS P. SKOURAS last week pre- 
sented to the 20th Century-Fox board re- 
sults of his discussion with Loew's execu- 
tives on a possible consolidation of physi- 
cal studio facilities. The 20th-Fox presi- 
dent made his report following a series of 
talks with Metro officials based on 20th's 
leasing of Leo's Culver City facilities in- 
stead of producing on its own lot. Pri- 
mary consideration, it was reported, was 
the amount of costs that might be saved 
by eliminating the overhead on 20th's 
property. There will be no merger of 
production, it was stressed. (What would 
be done with the 20th-Fox lot was a 
matter of conjecture, but it was not un- 
likely that its oil-producing potential 
would be developed further.) At least one 
of the directors, Darryl F. Zanuck, indi- 
cated a coolness to consolidating produc- 
tion from an economy standpoint, but felt 
there may be advantage "in having two 
companies use one lot for production". 

O 

DARRYL F. ZANUCK, in New York to 
set up promotion and distribution plans 
for his first independent production, 
"Island in the Sun", termed the Govern- 
ment's stand against distribution mergers 
"foolish". A consolidation of distribution 
— not production — "would be beneficial 
for the industry," he told a press confer- 
ence because considerable economies 
could be effected. "I always thought there 
were too many distribution companies." 




Darryl Zanuck faces the press to talk about 
his first inde production and general industry 
problems. 20th-Fox v.p. Charles Einfeld. right. 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 

PHILLIP F. HARLING, co-chairman 
of the industry's Joint Committee Against 
Pay-As-You-See-TV, last week voiced a 
protest against the Senate Commerce 
Committee's reported intention to recom- 
ment to the FCC that toll-TV be given a 
trial in selected area. "The attempt to get 
a foot in the door is too obvious," Harl- 
ing said. "We feel that the recommenda- 
tions of the . . . Senate Committee has no 
basis in fact or in law, and the staff re- 
port of the Senate Committee admits that 
the question of legality is clouded". Spon- 
sors of the trial plan, Zenith Radio Corp., 
Skiatron TV Corp., Skiatron Electronics 
and TV Corp., and International Tele- 
meter Corp., the latter a Paramount sub- 
sidiary, were encouraged by support in 
FCC higher ranks, including Chairman 
George C. McConnaghey, who has pub- 
licly backed FCC authority to consign 
public domain wavelengths to private use. 
The Senate committee were said to be- 
lieve that the only way to determine if 
Toll-TV is feasible, and in the public in- 
terest, is to try it under strict controls. 

0 

ELMER C. RHODEN announced to Na- 
tional stockholders that the company has 
earmarked $2 million for financing inde- 
pendent motion picture production. The 
money will go toward backing a wholly- 
owned subsidiary corporation whose goal 
will be the creation of a revolving fund 
sufficiently large to finance a number of 
quality films to be made by independent 
producers. It is hoped that this will 
"stimulate further production of quality 
motion pictures suitable for screening in 
the larger theatres". The NT president 
also pointed out: "Our purpose is de- 
signed to develop an additional source of 
revenue for the company as well as pro- 
viding security through having additional 
pictures available for our theatres at a 
time when production of motion pictures 
is at a dangerously low level". 

0 

WILLIAM DOZIER, RKO production 
head, told a trade press conference that 
RKO intends to make three or four "big 
pictures" in 1957, supplemented by four 
or six independents, as part of the com- 
pany's new "flexible" production policy. 
According to Dozier, RKO will make 
pictures only when suitable stories and 
stars are available, rather than on a sched- 
ule, and then will "sell them individually, 
exploit them individually and distribute 
them individually". He defended his com- 
pany's merging its distribution facilities 
with Universal. "Something drastic must 
be done in order to keep costs down and 
get more of the dollar that is spent on the 
screen and not on non-creative costs." 

[More NEWS on Page 16] 




YATES 



HERBERT J. YATES informed Repub- 
lic Pictures stockholders that distribution 
of the company's 210 post-1948 films to 
television could realize from $15 to $20 
million in revenue. In his report on the 
fiscal year ending Oct. 27, 1956, the Re- 
public president also revealed that the 
company's net income had dropped from 
the preceding year despite an increase in 
gross income. Net profit this year was 
$758,401, compared to $919,034 of 1955. 
Gross revenue amounted to $42,236,305 
compared to $39,621,099 of the previous 
year. Among steps being taken to reduce 
costs, Yates pcinted to the company's 
plans to merge its foreign distribution 
with independent distributors. 

0 

HARRY C. ARTHUR, JR., board chair- 
man of the Southern California Theatre 
Owners, has asked the Dept. of Justice 
to "make a full inquiry" into the recent 
RKO-Universnl distribution merger "to 
determine the effect of these arrangements 
upon competitive conditions in the motion 
picture and television industry". Acting 
on behalf of SCTOA, Arthur, in a letter 
to assistant attorney general Victor R. 
Hansen, asks the inquiry be made to de- 
termine whether the merger is consistent 
with antitrust laws and if future such ar- 
rangements should be prevented. 




Stanley Warner Philadelphia zone manager 
Ted Schlanger hosts members of IATSE at a 
cocktail party in Philadelphia's new Sheraton 
Hotel during the association s recent national 
convention. From I.: Penna.'s auditor-general 
elect Charles E. Smith. IATSE pres. Richard 
Walsh. Schlanger. IATSE v.p. Harry Abbott. 

Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 15 



THEY 



MADE THE NEWS 




Top: Shirtsleeved United Artists advertising 
head Max Youngstein, left, distribution v.p. 
II illiam J. Heineman. and sales head James 
R. Velde conduct workshop session during 
I A s recent 1957 sales convention in New 
York. Bottom: District managers meet with 
home office sales execs at the conclave. Seated, 
from I.: mgrs. George Pabst. Milton Cohen. 
Velde. Al Fitter. Standing, from I.: mgrs. 
Ralph Clark. Mike Lee. Gene Tunick. Sidney 
Cooper. Charles S. Chaplin. 

MAX E. YOUNGSTEIN, United Artists 
advertising v.p., told UA's 1957 sales con- 
vention in New York recently that the 
company will spend a record $6 million to 
promote its "blockbuster" release pro- 
gram. The slate, as announced by UA 
distribution topper William J. Heineman, 
will consist of 23 features available to ex- 
hibitors from March to July, ten de- 
scribed as of "blue chip" calibre. Presi- 
dent Arthur B. Krim told the assembled 
district managers and sales officials that 
the company will invest more than $40 
million in production this year, represent- 
ing virtually 100 per cent financing of its 
releases. UA will continue to invest all 
of its earnings in future production, Krim 
declared. Since the present executive 
team took over leadership of United Ar- 
tists in 1951, he noted, all profits have 
been applied to new product. He called 
this a vital factor in the success of the 
company's long-range development pro- 
gram. Distribution chief Heineman to the 
convention: "We are confident of the 
future, and we are expressing this con- 
fidence by meeting the demand for quality 
product." Advertising director Roger 
Lewis reported that the field staff will be 
expanded to more than 50 men. 




Page 16 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



OSCARS, the Hollywood betting line 
says, will likely go to the following 
nominees in the top four categories: best 
actor — Yul Brynner, "The King and I" 
(20th-Fox) ; best actress — Ingrid Berg- 
man, "Anastasia" (20th-Fox) ; best direc- 
tor — George Stevens, "Giant" (Warners) ; 
best picture — "Giant". Other nominees in 
the running as announced Feb. 18 by the 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and 
Sciences: actors — James Dean, "Giant", 
Kirk Douglas, "Lust for Life" (MGM); 
Rock Hudson, "Giant"; Sir Laurence 
Olivier, "Richard II" (Lopert) ; actresses 
— Ingrid Bergman, "Anastasia" (20th- 
Fox) ; Katharine Hepburn, "The Rain- 
maker" (Paramount) ; Nancy Kelly, "The 
Bad Seed" (Warners) ; Deborah Kerr, 
"The King and I" (20th-Fox) ; directors 
— William Wyler, "Friendly Persuasion" 
(Allied Artists) ; Michael Anderson, 
"Around The World In 80 Days"; Walter 
Lang, "The King and I"; King Vidor, 
"War and Peace" (Paramount); pictures 
— "Friendly Persuasion", "Giant", "The 
King and I", "The Ten Commandments" 
(Paramount). Results of the final voting 
will be announced March 27 during the 
Awards telecast emceed by Jerry Lewis 
over the NBC network. 

O 

COLUMBIA'S "Don't Knock The Rock" 
and a rock 'n roll stage show at New 
York's Paramount Theatre splashed 
across the nation's front pages when 
thousands of teenagers stormed the house 
and brought out the police in force. Rock 
'n roll fans began lining up at 4 a.m., and 
their wild antics both inside and outside 
the theatre were gorily detailed in wire 
service stories that must have aroused 
grave misgivings in countless parents. 




proposed District of Columbia Auditorium to 
President Eisenhower. Other members of the 
Auditorium Commission, created by Congress, 
include, from I.: Mrs. Agnes E. Meyer, George 
L. Williams, Rep. Joel Broyhill, Dr. George 



M. Johnson. 

Allied Artists forthcoming product 
was given extensive airing at the 
company's recent studio sales meet- 
ing, with sales head Morey R. 
Goldstein presiding. Shown from 
I.: president Steve Broidy. sales 
mgr. Harold Wirthwein. Goldstein, 
v.p. Harold Mirisch. sales rep. Ar- 
thur Greenblatt, sales mgrs. L. E. 
Goldhammer. Nat Xathanson. Gold- 
stein revealed that 'Friendly Per- 
suasion gross would exceed origi- 
nal $4 million estimate. 



HEADLINERS . . . 



JAMES F. GOULD named v.p. of Radio 
City Music Hall . . . NED MOSS appoint- 
ed RKO studio publicity representative, 
succeeding MERVIN HOUSER who re- 
signed to become world-wide publicity di- 
rector for the Selznick Company . . . 
RALPH M. COHN elected to the board 
of directors of Columbia Pictures, filling 
vacancy left by death of his father, Jack 
Cohn. Columbia president HARRY 
COHN announcing the appointment... 
FRANK J. MOONEY named by sales 
exec JAMES R. VELDE to newly- 
created post of supervisor of circuit and 
key city dating for United Artists. 
Mooney served with RKO for 28 years in 
various sales posts . . . RICHARD G. 
SETTOON promoted to Atlanta branch 
manager for U-I, succeeding WILLIAM 
D. KELLY, who resigned. ROBERT 
LEE CARPENTER succeeds Settoon as 
Memphis branch manager . . . FRANK 
YOUNG named publicity director of 
NTA Film Network, set to go into com- 




Paramount's Barney Balaban receives award of 
Foreign Language Press for "The Ten Command- 
ments" as best film of 1956. From I., Press mem- 
bers Dr. Tibor Weber, Sigmund Gottlober. 

mercial operation in April. National Tele- 
film Associates president ELY A. LAN- 
DAU announced ... IRVING SOCHIN, 
sales topper for Rank Film Distributors 
of America, announced sales appoint- 
ments: district managers RAY JONES, 
SEYMOUR BORDE, ABE WEINER, 
DAVE PRINCE, R. J. FOLLIARD, AL 
KOLITZ; branch managers JAMES B. 
MOONEY, JOHN DeCORTA, STAN 
DAVIS... JAMES BIONDO handling 
publicity at the William Goldman Mid- 
town theatre, Philadelphia, for Michael 
Todd's "Around The World in 80 Days" 
. . . Industry analyst ALBERT SIND- 
LINGER reports attendance up 7 per cent 
during an average week in January, and 
the best New Year's week in five years. 
Also, reports Sindlinger in his new client 
service publication "Activity", studies 
show an increase in those who consider 
or discuss going to the movies . . . Record 
bookings reported by 20th-Fox sales head 
ALEX HARRISON for "Spyros P. 
Skouras 15th Anniversary Celebration", 
March 24-30 . . . Universal executive vice 
president ALFRED E. DAFF a recent 
home office visitor . . . National Theatres 
general manager FRANK RICKETSON, 
Jr., exhibitor chairman of National 
Brotherhood Week (Feb. 17-24), heading 
list of 500 industryites at kick-off meeting 
in Los Angeles Feb. 20 . . . Allied Artists 
v.p. and sales topper MOREY R. GOLD- 
STEIN announced establishment of com- 
pany's 31st domestic branch in Jackson- 
ville, Florida, named ROBERT M. 
BOWERS branch manager ... CECIL 
B. DeMILLE to receive special award of 
the National Administrative Committee of 
B'nai B'rith March 25 at the Sheraton- 
Astor in New York for "The Ten Com- 
mandments" ... The Department of 
Justice has charged Jerrold Electronics 
(wired Toll-TV) with violating antitrust 
laws with its community TV antenna 
systems... KERMIT RUSSELL added 
to DCA sales staff as Midwest district 
mgr. DIED: BENJAMIN ("B. P.") 
SCHULBERG, 65, producer and former 
Paramount production head, father of 
novelist Budd Schulberg. 




NOMINATED FOR ACADEMY AWARD: 
ANTHONY PERKINS— 
Best Supporting Actor. ("Friendly Persuasior 



FEAR 

STRIKES 
OUT 



starring 

ANTHONY KARL 



"ANTHONY 
PERKINS is the new sen- 
sation. Every recent young 
star has been compared to 
James Dean. From now 
on the standard is Tony 
Perkins." 

— HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

"ANTHONY 
PERKINS is wonderful — 
an award contending per- 
formance. ' —FILM DAILY 

"ANTHONY 
PERKINS seems certain 
to enhance the personal fol- 
lowing he won in 'Friendly 
Persuasion'. " 

—MOTION PICTURE DAILY 

| "ANTHONY 

PERKINS delivers an ex- 
ceptional job." -VARIETY 

"ANTHONY 
PERKINS reveals himself 
as a talented performer in 
a demanding role!" 

, —MOTION PICTURE HERALD 



WKINSMALDEN 

taYisioh " 



Produced by Directed by Screenplay by 

LAN PAKULA ■ ROBERT MULLIGAN ■ TED BERKMAN and RAPHAEL BLAU 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 



I Continued from Page 7) 

the sternest war. In Joseph Vogel, most Loew's share- 
holders believe they found an Androcles to deliver their 
suffering Leo of his thorn. 

O 

This observer will neither urge or dissuade present or 
prospective shareholders to bet on this surgical possibility. 
For a justifiable cynicism, born of past performance, cau- 
tions go easy. The deed is forever master of the prospect. 

If one appraises the potential reconstruction of a waning 
enterprise by the personal deportment of its newly ap- 
pointed leader, the percentages say go Loew's. If one re- 
lates corporate success to the pre-eminence of its directors 
in alien fields, the wise money again says go Loew's. But 
if one has suffered the company through five annual 
gatherings of official charm and spoon-feeding, he learns to 
inure himself against too much hope. Indeed, there is 
something almost spiritual about a shareholder who, after 
five years of fiscal punishment, yet maintains a position in 
the company at all. 

Nonetheless, the Loew's of 1957 seems invaded with a 
new and refreshingly unique quality that serves a promise 
of redemption to shareholders of both long and short 
standing. That quality is an unstrained mixture of pride 
and almost ruthless determination. It is buttressed by the 
candor and realism of its new president. Do not sell short 
the inner frustrations of a fallen giant, nor sell short the 
furious length to which it will reach to recapture its nobili- 
ty of yore. Loew's is a corporation stung. Its officer corps 
has endured greater vilification, deserved or not, than any 
filmdom management team that comes to mind. In the 
final analysis, these elements — above all else — render 
Loew's worthy of investment consideration. 



THEY LDVED JOE VDGEL! 

(Continued from Page 6) 

Invited to state how many pictures per year were 
planned : "We are not going to make pictures just because 
they eat up overheads or because we have people on the 
staff who should be working. Rather than make more pic- 
tures I'd prefer to make good ones." 

Quizzed on the possibilities of drilling for oil on the 
studio property: "It was checked by some people who do 
not think there is too much oil there." 

One by one the new directors of Loew's were introduced 
— most of them gray-haired or partially bald — and late in 
the proceedings when a number of stockholders were be- 
ginning to fidget for something with which to satisfy their 
coffee hunger, Joseph Tomlinson, the Canadian-naturalized 
millionaire whose blistering attacks on the company's man- 
agement had brought about reorganization of the Board, 
was requested to say a few words. 

The good-looking, sun-tanned, ruggedly-built man 
(who, cddly, parts his hair on the "wrong" side), Mr. 
Tomlinson said he was pleased there had been a reconcili- 
ation between the company and the dissident stockholders. 
He would do his utmost, as one of the new directors, to 
promote the interests and welfare of the company, and to 
rehabilitate it, and so on. 

Joe Vogel lighted yet another cigarette. The ordeal was 
drawing to a close. Even Judge Louis Goldstein, a trustee 
of the Leon Lowenstein Foundation, owners of 100,000 
Loew's shares, who had previously castigated the old man- 
agement for its favoritism and nepotism, commented: 
"The new Board has the ring of integrity, ability and ex- 
perience, and I and those I represent, will be pleased to 
vote for their election." 

So this great company's annual meeting which, only 
three months ago, had iooked like it might become a battle- 
ground between the management and various stockholder 
factions, passed into the realm of corporate history with- 
out the expected fireworks, with everyone acknowledging, 
' J^e Vogel made them love him." 



SHOWMEN. . . 
What Are YOU Doing? 

Send us your advertising, publicity and exploitation 
campaigns — with photos — for inclusion in our 
EXPLOITATION & MERCHANDISING DEPARTMENT 




To the Editor: 

I have studied the contents of your 
February 18th issue from the mo- 
ment it arrived, as I heartily concur 
that this is the time for exhibitor 
unity. Only yesterday noon I sat on 
the dais for the Texas Drive-in 
Owners Association Convention and 
made a short address, but was tre- 
mendously impressed with the talk 
made by Julius Gordon, the new 
president of National Allied. There 
is no doubt in my mind that Julius 
has a deep appreciation of the many 
problems that are developing, and 
seems to sense that more can be ac- 
complished with an olive branch 
than in any other manner. 

I guess, in the final analysis, it is 
time for younger minds to assume 
these responsibilities, and a fresh 
viewpoint may overcome many of 
our present difficulties. 

I would like to reiterate that at no 
time in our history has exhibitor 
unity been more important than 
now. 

R. J. O'DONNELL 

Interstate Circuit. Inc. 
Dallas, Texas 



To the Editor : 

Your editorial of the 18th on the 
subject of Exhibitor Unity is forth- 
right and timely. Need for the full 
weight of all exhibitors in their own 
defense is greater than ever before. 
The battle is now one for exhibitor 
survival. 

I doubt there can be only one na- 
tional exhibitor organization. There 
are too many diverse interests, too 
many divergent personalities which 
could only be neutralized by passage 
of the years, and we do not have 
that kind of time left ! 



Reader Views on 



Your idea of a "Congress cf Ex- 
hibition" has great merit, as the idea 
of COMPO had great merit at its in- 
ception. Yet, as COMPO has dem- 
onstrated, there is the always pres- 
ent danger of one element or even 
just one man taking over control 
and using veto power for selfish in- 
terests, with utter disregard of the 
other components. 

Your "Congress" idea is worthy of 
further exploration, bearing in mind 
its inherent dangers, if for no ether 
reason than use as a vehicle by 
which problems might be expedited 
to solution. 

In the meantime, it appears to me 
that Allied under Rube Shor ar.d 
TOA under Myron Blank have dem- 
onstrated that the two leading ex- 
hibitor organizations can work to- 
gether in harmony for the common 
good of their members, without 
either losing its identity. I find no 
valid reason to believe this cannot 
be continued under Julius Gordon 
and Ernest Stellings. 

LEO F. WOLCOTT 

Allied Independent Theatre Owners 
of louu and Nebraska, Inc. 

* * * 

To the Editor: 

You have no doubt read in the 
trade papers of my retiring as presi- 
dent of North Central Allied after 
eleven years of service. One of the 
reasons for my retiring is the ama- 
teurish handling of public and trade 
relations by the so-called leaders 
that made a mess out of this indus- 
try. The many hassles, law suits 
and legislation all emanated from 
the stupid leadership of the pro- 
ducers. 

For years I have urged the leaders 
of the producers and distributors to 
have a round table discussion with 
leaders of exhibition if they were 
desirous of developing a format in- 
cluding an intelligent arbitration 



Exhibitor Unity 



system. This they refused to rgree 
to, probably on advice from their at- 
torneys who were anxious for more 
litigation. The film companies' re- 
fusal of my persistant urgings for 
such a top level conference has 
brought about derogatory legislation 
and without question a reduction of 
the boxoffice. All of this made me 
down in the mouth. 

I still feel that a great deal could 
be salvaged if a top level industry 
meeting could be held. With the sad 
experiences behind us, the leaders 
should be able to develop a working 
format whereby the entire industry 
would work together instead of 
against each other. Arbitration, in- 
cluding film rental, at least in situ- 
ations grossing under $1,000 per 
week, is a must in order to assure all 
of the small theatres being able to 
purchase every top picture made on 
the basis of their ability to pay. If 
this could be brought about, the in- 
dustry would flourish and in this 
way there would be a good chance 
for most theatre organizations to 
combine into one national organiza- 
tion. 

BENJAMIN BERGER 

North Central Allied Independent 
Theatre Owners. Inc. 



To the Editor: 

Your suggestion, of a "Congress 
of Exhibition" to bring about unity 
in the industry, is a good one. I have 
always felt that our industry cou'd 
remain strong and virile if we were 
properly organized and had the 
proper leadership. The big problem 
is to bring about such a Congress 
that will be effective and work to the 
benefit of the entire industry. I hope 
that day is not too far off. 

MYRON N. BLANK 

Central States Theatre Corp. 
Des Moines. Iowa 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Peg? 19 




Elephants can never forget something they do not 
understand. Humans, too frequently, forget what they 
know. . . and that includes exhibitors. Don't let your theatre 
become a white elephant because you forgot the impor- 
tance of trailers. Remember that trailers have stood the 
test of time with a jumbo patronage potential at small cost. 
Don't take them for granted. Play trailers regularly and 
continuously with every show. Remember, trailers are not 
time fillers . . . they're seat fillers. 




nflTlonflL 



Screen 

\_) pniif soar t 



SERVICE 

or mf mommy 



SINDLINGER 

Survey showed 34.2 per cent went to the movies because of TRAILERS! 

NATIONAL THEATRES CIRCUIT IN 21 STATES 

Survey showed 43 per cent went to the movies because of TRAILERS! 



Ix&ilets Showmen '5 Socko Salesmen / 




4> Gil Golden, Warner ad chief, confers with 
tuffalo Paramount Theatre executives on promo- 
ional-exploitation plans for "Paris Does Strange 
hings". L to r: Paramount Theatre manager Ed 
filler, Charles Taylor, publicity director, Golden 
ind Art Krolich, district manager of the circuit. 

Meade's Approach to Art Films 
Sells Small Town Theatregoers 

An experiment started by Walter Reade 
{ Theatres six years ago, bringing art films to 
small town local theatres, is paying hand- 
, some dividends to the circuit. Tabbed "Cur- 
tain at 8:40", the specialized format has be- 
come a regular part of the circuit's opera- 
tion, with additional theatres being added to 
the roster each season. 

President Walter Reade, Jr. explains the 
plan as follows: "On a special evening each 
week for four to six consecutive weeks, the 
regular film show is replaced by an art film 
for one showing. On this night the entire 
atmosphere of the theatre changes. The staff 
is dressed in evening clothes; the refresh- 
ment stands are closed and free Martinson's 
Coffee is served in the lounge. All attempts 
to duplicate the most intimate New York art 
theatre atmosphere is made, including the 
showing of special art exhibits in the lobby. 
There is one showing of the feature and a 
specially selected short subject, starting at 
8:40 which allows the patrons to have a lei- 
surely dinner, and ending early enough so 
that they will be able to return home at a 
reasonable hour." 

"Curtain at 8:40" series are presented three 
times a year: Winter, Spring and Fall. The 
current series of films includes: "The Snow 
Was Black", "Silent World", "Rififi", 
"Madame Butterfly", "Secrets of The Reef" 
and "Privates Progress"; and will play at 
the Carlton Theatre, Red Bank; Community 
Theatre, Morristown; Paramount Theatre, 
Plainfield — all in New Jersey; and the Com- 
munity Theatres in Kingston, Hudson and 
Saratogo Springs — in New York. 

Rock V Roll Dictionary 

"Sir Bop's Unabridged Hiptionary," a dic- 
tionary for rock n' rollers of all ages is being 
used as a giveaway gimmick by American- 
International to beat the promotional drum 
for "Rock All Night". Over 500,000 copies 
have been ordered in the initial printing. 




Lyday Lifts Tour Girls' 
With Sock Contest and Prizes 

Leave it to Paul Lyday, managing director 
of Fox Inter-Mountain's Denver Theatre, to 
dress up an old stunt and come up with a 
lulu of a promotional contest for Universal's 
"Four Girls in Town". 

Joining hands with the Denver Post, Wes- 
tern Airlines and the Piero De Luise Travel 
Agency, the aggressive Mile High City 
showman set out to find four girls, working 
for any single concern, who collectively were 
most representative of the U-I film's four 
fern stars. Prizes to the winning quartet was 
an all-expenses paid weekend at the Desert 
Inn in Las Vegas, including transportation 
to and from the famous resort provided by 
the cooperating airline. Lyday was swamped 
by almost 400 attractive hopefuls. He credits 
the tremendous turnout to the "courage in 
numbers" psychology. 




-0r- To stimulate the growth of new talent in 
advertising art, United Artists is endowing an 
annual $1000 scholarship at Brooklyn's Pratt In- 
stitute. The company will also award prizes to 
winners of bi-monthly student contests on art 
interpretations of upcoming films. Roger H. 
Lewis (left), UA advertising chief and Ralph 
Sterling, vice president of Pratt, announced the 
ad talent program at a press reception. 

Schine Showmen Key R 'n' R 
Promotions to Teenage Market 

John Corbett, manager of the Rialto in 
Amsterdam, N. Y. grabbed plenty of atten- 
tion for 20th's "The Girl Can't Help It" by 
arranging for a group of high school musi- 
cians, to whom he gave the title "The Cotton 
Pickers", to appear on the stage as an added 
attraction. Corbett picked up plenty of free 
radio plugs by contacting a local disk jockey 
to m.c. the show. 

At the Riviera, Rochester, N. Y., manager 
Joe DeSilva promoted a big dance contest 
for "Shake, Rattle and Rock". With two 
high school bands making with the music 
and twenty couples as contestants, DeSilva 
boosted his take tremendously. 




[More SHOWMEN on Page 24] 



Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 21 



EXPLOITATION PICTURE 



DOUBLE EXCITEMENT- NEW STAR, SOCK STORY 



The excitement of a new star and the 
powerful drama of a father-son conflict that 
exploded into nationwide headlines give the 
showman two major toeholds on their cam- 
paign for Paramount's "Fear Strikes Out". 

Anthony Perkins, who appears to be the 
most exciting new star discovery among the 
scores who have been touted as the successor 
to the late James Dean, follows his trium- 
phant debut in "Friendly Persuasion" with a 
role that brims with dramatic opportunities. 
As Jimmy Piersall, the Boston Red Sox star 
who had to fight both for and against suc- 
cess on the playing field and an inner tur- 
moil spawned and cultivated by a domineer- 
ing father, young Tony is exposed to one of 
the most challenging dramatic roles ever 
handed to a new player. Paramount's box- 
officers under Jerry Pickman's direction, 
have practically nailed down an entire cam- 
paign around the Perkins portrayal. 

The ads abound with the sensitive Perkins 
features as they play up "The Screen's Ex- 
plosive New Guy in His First Starring 
Role!" The grim, taut drama of the pro- 
tagonist's dilemma — the boy being driven by 
his father to a perfection he could never hope 
to attain — is carried out in powerful varia- 
tions of the copy that surrounds the art. 

Not to be overlooked is the presence of 
Karl Maiden, of current "Baby Doll" fame. 
He plays the powerful father role. 

Significantly, in the main campaign, there 
is little indication of the baseball background, 



except in the title, which was retained from 
the famed Saturday Evening Post and Read- 
ers Digest story read by millions. This is 
undoubtedly a deliberate omission, for, with 
a few exceptions, films with a baseball back- 
ground have labored under a handicap of fe- 
male antipathy. And since the major premise 
of "Fear Strikes Out" is not baseball, but 
rather a young man's inner struggle, it is 
neither dishonest nor misrepresentative to 
concentrate on the latter factor., It hap- 
pened with a baseball player, but it could 
have happened with a youth in any field of 
endeavor where a talent is stretched to a 
breaking point. For those showmen who 
wish to pitch to the sports fans a full page 
of material is presented in the pressbook. 

The Perkins exploitation should go beyond 
the newspaper ads. Displays, radio, TV and 
stunts are suggested in the pressbook to en- 
hance the new star angle. A lobby teaser, 
for example, simply suggests the use of the 
one-sheet with a window shade over it which, 
when drawn, reads "Curtain Going Up On A 
New Star!" Radio introduces Tony Perkins 
as the guy "Everybody's talking about . . . 
You'll be thrilled by . . . Hollywood's sensa- 
tional new personality . . .", etc. 

These, then, are the angles — an exciting 
new star ... an explosive, powerful story— 
a combination that is one of the strongholds 
of boxoffice showmanship. The individual 
showman can decide whether the baseball 
aspect is an asset, and exploit accordingly. 



•W- The ads are primarily divided into two styles; first and foremost is the play-up of Tony Per- 
kins as "the screen's explosive new guy" (see below); others feature dramatic father-son conflict. 




FEAR A 
STRIKES 

OUT 





Tony Perkins-the 
screen's explosive 
new guy- lives the 
Saturday Evening 
Post and Reader's 
Digest frank, from 
life report of a kid 
who came out of 
the shadows... 
ready to handle 
anything but the 
thing that lived 
inside him! 



Produced by Alan Pakula Directed by Robert Mulligan ■ Screenplay by Ted Berkman 

Wd Raphael Blau ■ Based on a Stoy by James A P<e/sali and Albert S nrshberg ■ A Paramount P'C\. — 



BASEBALL 
ANGLES 

In certain situations, 
the baseball background 
will pre-sell a huge 
audience. To take ad- 
vantage of this, Para- 
mount has special mats 
available to play up the 
Piersall name and the 
story that is known to 
every baseball fan. The 
complete campaign 
aimed at sports fans in- 
cludes: special ads like 
the one shown here; 
suggested displays such 
as a huge bat over the 
marquee; tie-ups with 
sports equipment and 
department stores, 
screenings for sports- 
writers, radio and TV 
sports announcers and 
commentators; co-ops 
with boys' clubs, Little 
Leaguers, etc. 




ANTHONY PERKINS • KARL MALOCN 



TEAR STRIKES OUT" 

There have been a handful of 
humanly dramatic moments that stand 
out in the annals of the Great Ameri- 
can Pastime — among them the heart- 
tugging farewells of Lou Gehrig and 
Babe Ruth to their teammates and the 
fans, the comeback of Monty Strat- 
ton, the crack-up of Jimmy Piersall as 
he went berserk after hitting a home 
run and had to be carried off the 
field, a shrieking psychotic (opposite 
page). The story of Piersall, as por- 
trayed by Anthony Perkins in Alan 
Pakula's production for Paramount, 
bids to surpass the other true-life 
sagas of sports figures in its sheer 
dramatic power, not because it is the .! 
story of a great athlete, but because I 
it explores in gripping detail the har- I 
rowing experience of a man driven to j 
a success that he could not endure. It f 
follows the elder Piersall's (Karl Mai- 
den) incessant driving of his son to 
the big league ranks to make up for 
his own failure as a player. The boy's 
desperate efforts finally lead to that 
excruciating moment when he can no 
longer stand the strain of his father's 
fierce ambition, and his mind 
crumbles. In a mental hospital, he 
learns of his father's frustrated am- 
bition, and they are reconciled. 



Page 22 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 




Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 Page 23 



74J&at t&e Shuiwim /tie 'Doiayi 




Celebrities, plus crowds of just folks, -A- 
equal plenty of publicity. An Air Force band 
and Color Guard were on hand to welcome a 
flying replica of Charles Lindbergh's "Spirit of 
St. Louis" at Roosevelt Field, Long Island as 
part of the build-up for world debut at Radio 
City Music Hall. Top: among the celebs are 
(left to right) N. Y. Senator Jacob Javitz; 
Major General Roger J. Browne, First Air Force 
Commander; the film's producer, Leland Hay- 
ward and Tab Hunter, WB star-fieldman. Bot- 
tom: close-up view of the ceremony crowds. 

Metro to Ballyhoo 'Bedrooms 1 

If there is a quartet of sisters around who 
happen to be planning a four-couple wedding 
the last week in March, Metro is looking for 
them. Inspired to start a quest for such a 
unique bridal party by the story line in "Ten 
Thousand Bedrooms," Dean Martin's first 
solo vehicle, Leo's exploitation department 
is offering a free-for-everybody honeymoon 
complete with all the trimmings. 



Six National Tie-ups Hypo 
'Reunion' Audience Potential 

Over 90,000,000 Americans will be exposed 
to advertisements in newspapers and maga- 
zines, and in store displays highlighting 
"Spring Reunion" as the result of United Ar- 
tists tie-ups with six national manufacturers. 
Among companies participating in the co-op 
campaigns: American Latex Corp, American 
Airlines, Plymouth Raincoats, National Gyp- 
sum Corp., Wohl Shoe and Honeybug Shoes. 

Full-page newspaper ads complete with a 
photo of Miss Hutton and prominent credits 
to the Bryna Production will be placed by 
American Airlines in the two New York 
papers (the Times and Tribune) and three 
Los Angeles dailies. Plymouth Raincoats 
will place a full-page in TV Guide and a 
half-page in Playboy, in addition to retail 
support by its 4000 dealers. National Gyp- 
sum will spotlight the UA release via ads in 
Business Week, U. S. News, Management 
Methods, Buildings and Nation's Business. 

Insertions in Movie Life, Movie Star and 
Parade coupled with window and counter 
displays featuring Miss Hutton and Wohl 
shoes will help sell the film to the fern mar- 
ket. Also keyed to the ladies, Honeybug is 
running a series of ads in nine magazines, in- 
cluding Charm and Glamour. Supplementary 
support from Honeybug retailers will feature 
special posters and display cards. 

Also on the point-of-purchase front, the 
romantic drama (Betty Hutton-Dana An- 
drews) is scheduled to grab plenty of plugs 
via American Latex bathing cap displays in 
5600 retail outlets using head cutouts of Miss 
Hutton as cap display pieces. 




-A- A throw-the-book-at-'em promotional -A 
campaign climaxed by a tri-theatre premiere in 
Marietta, Ohio garnered gobs of attention and 
space in all communications media for Univer- 
sal^ "Battle Hymn". Impact of the hustling, 
bustling bally drive is being felt from coast-to- 
coast. Top to bottom: 1 ) crowds saturate 
Colony Theatre in Marietta prior to debut fes- 
tivities. 2) Milton R. Rackmil, U-l president, 
left, confers with star Rock Hudson prior to 
opening at New York Capitol Theatre. 3) Spe- 
cial award is presented to Col. Dean Hess, 
whose life story is portrayed in the film, by Mrs. 
Charlotte Baruth, Chairman of the Motion Pic- 
ture Division of Women's Clubs, while U-l vice- 
president David Lipton looks on. 4) Hess visits 
in Cleveland with exhibitor Leo James. 

Macy's Boosts 'Full of Life' 

Seldom does a film have a story line so 
well suited to promotional ballyhoo as "Full 
of Life". This was aptly illustrated when the 
Columbia comedy grabbed some hefty pats- 
on-the-back by giant retailer, Macy's, in a 
recent full-page New York Times ad. Tout- 
ing "FOL' as a "merry movie about a baby 
coming", Macy's offered customers pickles, 
cigars and a maternity suit. 




Page 24 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



THE OLDER GENERATION 



Theatre Should he Community Ventre 



(Continued from Page 14) 

for them, but they usually make their own moviegoing de- 
cisions. 

This brings us to the question of the way the older peo- 
ple go to the movies. While there are many older people 
who live with their families, as well as countless elderly 
people living alone, gregariousness is an almost universal 
quality of healthy old age. No conclusive surveys of how 
they prefer to go to the movies have been made among our 
senior citizens, but an educated guess would be that they, 
even more than their juniors, like company when they go 
out. 

In terms of the family unit, there is no problem with the 
older couple. They go to the movies together. Even when 
they live alone, they tend to go to the movies with their 
friends. The drive-in theatre is the most notable exception 
to the otherwise general tendency against older-younger 
moviegoing combinations involving the oldest age group. 
At drive-ins, grandma and the kids go alog with mother 
and dad, as often as not, if grandma happens to live with 
them. (Incidentally, the degree of independence and sepa- 
ratism asserted by grandmothers is believed by many 
sociologists to be increasing, as the longer life span gives 
these older people more companions of their own age.) 



TIME ON THEIR HANDS 



Many families regard the movies as a sort of last resort 
for their elderly members. If some other group activity 
comes along, such as a church social for older folks, or a 
bridge club being formed, these family influences work 
against moviegoing, because of the family's desire to see 
grandpa or grandma expand her circle of friendships and 
activities. Moviegoing is a passive experience and things 
that give older people something to do are more highly re- 
garded when the chips are down. 

It is pointless to discuss whether this viewpoint is accu- 
rate. The fact that the view is held by large numbers of 
Americans makes it important without regard for its va- 
lidity. 

Perhaps the most significant commentary on the prob- 
lem of the older generation's moviegoing arises here. More 
than ever, the problem of things to do is a burning one for 
millions of aging American men and women. Whether re- 
tired or merely freed from the ceaseless chores of raising a 
family, they have more time on their hands than they used 
to. At this stage of the game, for the most part, they have 
enough money to get along, either on their own or through 
supplemental assistance from their children. Social securi- 
ty, insurance and pension schemes are continuously rais- 
ing the living standards of the aging, even though pinched 
by rising prices. 

In this situation, there is a golden opportunity to pro- 
mote greater moviegoing. No magic formula has yet been 
adduced for this purpose. But it is assuredly worth seeking. 

Some of the avenues of development are indicated in the 



evident likes and dislikes of the elderly audience, as di 
cussed earlier in this article. The most vital phase of t 
concept of the elderly market, however, may lie in tl 
function of the theatre itself. It seems fair to believe th 
where a theatre can play an integral role in the life of i 
community, it will have more institutional appeal for tl 
elderly. This is one reason why, in New York City, tl 
Metropolitan Opera maintains the continuous loyalty of i 
older patrons. 




How does a motion picture theatre achieve this sort o 
status? There is little doubt that a close relationship wit! 
local churches can be of material advantage. There is alsc 
reason to believe that cooperation with local merchants, ir 
displays of new products and honors for local citizenry 
can also be valuable. Vigorous attention to the various 
media of communication in the community — news items 
and ads in the papers, radio and tel«vision program ma- 
terial — is important to keep the older people mindful of the 
existence of the theatre and of the films it shows. 

Pleasant relationships with theatre personnel — ushers or 
doormen who recognize them and greet them with a 
friendly courtesy — also can be made to mean much in pro- 
moting movie attendance by oldsters. Sometimes, particu- 
larly if they are lonely, they are quite pleased to be put on 
the theatre's program mailing list (where there is one). 
Sometimes, conversely, they don't want to be bothered. A 
perceptive theatre man has to know his people and pro- 
ceed accordingly in his own community. 

Above all, there must not be any appearance of condes- 
cension or of "playing to the gallery". To take an extreme 
example, a theatre which emblazons as the motto above its 
portals "We cater to old folks," is going to arouse a great 
deal of resentment from old folks who don't particularly 
like to be called old folks and don't want to go to an estab- 
lishment which labels itself as a moviegoing adjunct of the 
old folks' home. The same theatre can probably do more 
to attract elderly patrons by helpful ushers, seat hearing 
aids, etc. 

Communities, like people, are not all the same. The pro- 
gram that succeeds in one town may not succeed in an- 
other. But there isn't a town in the nation where people 
aren't getting older every day. And the movie customer in 
every town must be the person of whom it can be said, 
"Age cannot wither . . . nor custom stale her infinite 
variety." 



Page 26 Film BULLETIN March 4, 1957 



Ccine tc Hct Spring*! 



3 Bth Annual Convention 

INDEPENDENT THEATRE OWNERS 
DE ARKANSAS, INC. 

Vel4a &cAe tHctel, Hd 
Apr il /-£ I9S7 
• 

Interesting and informative meetings as well as plenty of 
entertainment in one of the finest resorts in the country. 

For reservations write: 

Velda Hose Motel 
21B Park Avenue 
Hot Springs, Arkansas 



Film BULLETIN March 



4. 1957 Page 27 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCI 



All The Vital Details on Current &£> Coming Feature 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



ALLIED ARTISTS 



November 

BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in Hie death cell. 74 min. 

FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Marjorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Quaker family during the Civil War. 13? min. 1 0/ 1 



December 



HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 

HOT SHOTS Hunt* Hall, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 62 min. 



January 



CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

STORM OUT OF THE WEST Dale Robertson, Brian Keith, 
Rossano Rory. Producer Frank Woods. Director Brian 
Keith. Western. 72 min. 



February 



ATTACK OF THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. Hideous monsters take over remote 
Pacific Island. 68 min. 

LAST OF THE BADMEN CinemaScope, Color. George 
Montgomery, James Best. Producer Vincent Fennelly. 
Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws use detective 
as only recogniaeble man in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 

NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 67 min. 



March 



HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Hunfi Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle with unscrupulous hypnotist. 
61 min. 

JEANNIE CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony Martin, 
Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Director 
Henry Levin. Musical. Small-town girl meets washing 
machine inventor in Paris. 105 min. 



A pril 



FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT Bill Elliot, Don Haggerty. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Melo- 
drama. Man is sought by police for murder of his 
friend. 62 min. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 
Freeman, Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 
stockade in small western town. 81 min. 



Coming 



BADGE OF MARSHAL BRENNAN Jim Davis. Producer- 
director Albert Gannaway. Western. 



DAUGHTER Of DR. JEKYLL John Ag<sr, Gioria Talbot, 
AriW Sh'»Ws. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar Unger. Horror. 

Kohner. Producer 



HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME, THE CinemaScope, 
Color. Gina Lollobrigida , Anthony Quinn. A Paris 
Production. Director Jean Delanno;'. Drama. Hunch- 
back falls in love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 

LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wilder. Drama. 

OKLAHOMAN. THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
of unscrupulous brothers. 81 min. 

PERSUADER, THE William Talman, Kristine Miller, 
James Craig. Producer-director Dick Ross. 



COLUMBIA 



November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdonald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD, THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 
graphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
Yves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 

WHITE SQUAW. THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bic It- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 



December 



LAST MAN TO HANG. THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE Takashi Shimura Toshiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Akira Kurosawa. 
Melodrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/10 

RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY. THE Technicolor. Randolph Scott, 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the glory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 



January 



DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, Alan Dale. Producer Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor Feed Seart. Musical. Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 1/7. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest, Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
becomes notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 



February 



NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray, Anne Bancroft. Producer Ted 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaken 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money. 
78 min. 12/10. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun, Susan Cummings, Angela 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred Sears. 
Western. Two men join hands because they see in each 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 75 min. 
WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Phil Carey. Pro- 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. A 
beautiful girl wins a beauty contest and a "different" 
life. 132 min. 1/21. 



March 



FUEL OF LIFE Judy Holliday, Richard Conte, 
Salvatore Baccaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wife 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival of 
child. 91 min. 1/7. 

MAN WHO TURNED TO STONE, THE Victor Jory, Ann 
Doran. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Leslie Kardos. 
Mad doctor discovers secret of prolonged life. Horror. 
80 min. 2/18. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW, THE Betty Garrett, Phil 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Director 
William Asher. Melodrama. Sewn-year old boy is the 
only witness to a murder. 73 min. 

ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU Gregg Palmer, Allison Hayes. 
Horror. 70 min. 



April 



GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murpny, Kathryn 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brown. Director George 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women to 
fight off Indian attack. 



STRANGE ONE, THE Ben Gaziara, James Olsen, Ge 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames 
mander and his son. 



Coming 



BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. Co 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Dire 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men sec 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Graysoi 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fre 
Sears. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/1 
FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rit 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A Wai, 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drams 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is ir. 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 

FORTUNE IS A WOMAN Jack Hawkins, Arlene Dahl; 
Producers Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat. Director Sid 

ney Gilliat. 

GARMENT JUNGLE. THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Mat 
thews, Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. D! 
rector Robert Aldrich. Drama. 

GOLDEN VIRGIN, THE Joan Crawford, Rossano Brazzi 
Heather Sears. John and James Woolf producers. Di 
rector David Miller. 

HALF PAST HELL Victor Mature, Anita Ekberg, Trevo' 
Howard. A Warwick Production. Director John Gilling" 

KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller. Carol Thurston. Pre 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-mar' 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroy**/ 

by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

PAPA. MAMA. THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureux 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul L< 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisiar 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atlc 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor- 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in World 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL T, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone, Maureen 
Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Director Budd' 
Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles o be' 
independent. 

TOWN ON TRIAL John Mills, Charles Coburn, Bar- 
bara Bates. A Marksman Production. Director John' 
Gillerman. 

27TH DAY, THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Producer 
Helen Ainsworth. Director William Asher. Science- 
fiofion. People from outer space plot to destroy all 
human life on the earth. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY, THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmore. 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Drama.' 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



November 

IT CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International! 
Peter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 
space takes control of the world until a scientist givti 
his life to save humanity. 

MARCELINO lUnited Motion Picture Organiiation) 
Pabilto Calvo, Rafael Rivelles. Director Ladislao 
Vadja. Drama. Franciscan monks find abandoned baby 
and adopt him. 90 min. I 1/12. 

SECRETS OF LIFE (Buena VTsta). Latest in Walt Dis- 
ney's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/29. 
WEE GORDIE (George K. Arthur) Bill Travers, Elastalr 
Sim, Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 
Frank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 
stature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwing cham- 
pionship. 94 min. 11/12. 

WESTWARD HO, THE WAGONS (Buena Vista) Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kathleen Crowley. 
A Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 

December 

BABY AND THE BATTLESHIP, THE (DCA) Richard 
Attenborough, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
borough. Director Jay. Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 
smuggled aboard a British battleship during mock 

maneuvers. 

HOUR OF DECISION (Astor Pictures) Jeff Morrow. 
Drama. 



Film BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



APRIL SUMMARY 

The number of features scheduled for 
April release totals 1 3. however, later ad- 
ditions to the roster should double the 
number of attractions available to exhibi- 
tors. The leading supplier will be Univer- 
sal with three releases; Allied Artists, Co- 
lumbia, 20th-Fox and United Artists will 
release two each; Paramount and Warner 
Bros., one each. Four April films will be 
in color. CinemaScope features number 
three; VistaVision, one; Technirama, one. 

7 Dramas 2 Melodramas 

2 Westerns 1 Science-Fiction 

1 Musical 



| SORCIERE [Ellis Films) Marina Vlady, Nicole 
J rel. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A young French 

■ ineer meets untamed forest maiden while working 
| .weden. French dialogue. English subtitles. 

I 4 OF SHERWOOD FOREST (Astor Picturesl East- 
I , Color. Don Taylor. Producer Michael Carreras. 
I tctor Val Guest. Adventure. Story of Robin Hood 
I his men. 78 min. 

I :K, ROCK, ROCK IDCAI. Alan Freed. LaVern 
I er Frankle Lyman. A Vanguard Production. Musical 
I orama of rock and roll. 

BW WAS BLACK, THE (Continental) Daniel Gelin. 
' jntine Tessier. A Tellus Film. French language film. 
I ma. Study of an embittered young man who lives 

■ 1 mother in her house of ill fame. 105 min. 

' 0 LOVES HAVE I IJacon) Technicolor. Gabriele 
letti, Marta Toren. A Riuoli FMm. Director Carmine 
lone. Drama. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 
t known operas. 

January 

iERT SCHWEITZER (Hill and Anderson) Eastman 
or. Film biography of the famous Nobel Prize win- 

with narritive by Burgess Merideth. Producer-direc- 

James Hill. Documentary. 

LLFIGHT I Janus). French made documentary offers 
'lory and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
I directed by Pierre Braunberger. 76 min. II 26 

'VR lAstor Pictures) Ingrid Bergman, Mathias Wie- 
'n. Director Roberto Rossellini. Drama. Young 

■ rried woman is mercilessly exploited by blackmailer. 

NAWAY DAUGHTERS I American-International ) 
1 rla English, Anna Sten. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
tor Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
• problems. 

AKE, RATTLE AND ROCK (American-International) 
a Gaye, Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson, 
ector Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 

ITELONI I API-Janus). Franco Inrerlenghi, Leonora 
briii. Producer Mario de Veechi. Director F. Fel- 
i. Comedy. Story of unemployed young men in Italy, 
i min. 11/24. 

: ARE ALL MURDERERS IKingsley International) 
ircel Mouloudji, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
lyette. Drama. 

February 

D OF GRASS ITrans-Lux) Anna Brazzou. Made in 
eeee. English titles. Drama, A beautiful girl is per- 
:uted by her villiage for Having lost her virtue as 
> victim of a rapist. 

ESH AND THE SPUR (American-International) Color, 
hn Agar, Maria English, Touch Connors. Producer 
ex Gordon. Director E. Cahn. Western. Two men 
arch for a gang of outlaw killers. 86 min. 

3UR OF DECISION (Astor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
izel Court. Producer Monty Berman. Director Denn- 
jton Richards. Melodrama. Columnist's wife is in- 
cently involved in blackmail and murder. 70 min. 

4KED PARADISE (American-International) Color, 
chard Denny, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
>ger Corman. Drama. Man and woman bring Ha- 
aiian smugglers to justice. 72 min. 

iMPEST IN THE FLESH (Pacemaker Pictures) Ray- 
3nd Pellegrin, Francoise Arnoul. Director Ralph 
abib. French film, English titles. Drama. Study of a 
mng woman with a craving for love that no number 
men can satisfy. 

March 

MDEAD, THE I American-International) Pamela Dun- 
m, Allison Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
:ience-fiction. A woman turns into a witch. 71 min. 

50DOO WOMAN (American-International) Maria 
iglish, Tom Conway, Touch Connors. Producer Alex 
ordon. Director Edward Cahn. Horror. Adventuress 
eking native treasure is transformed into monster by 
ngle scientist. 75 min. 

'OMAN OF ROME (DCA) Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
•lin. A Ponti-DeLaurentlis Production. Director Luigi 
impa. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
ivel. 

May 

JCK ALL NIGHT (American-International) Dick 
■Her. Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson. Producer-director 
>ger Corman. Rock n' roll musical. 65 min. 

Coming 

ITY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen, Robert 
utton, Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Petroff. 
■ama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 

IAGSTRIP GIRL (American-International I Fay Spain, 
eve Terrell, John Ashley. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
ctor Edward Cahn. Story of teen-age hot rod and 
agstrip racing kids. 75 min. 

ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . IBuena Vista) 
idre Valmy, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 
'ama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 
eir efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 
3ST CONTINENT IIFE) CinemaScope, Ferranicolor. 
;oducer-director Leonardo Bonzi. An excursion into the 
ilds of Borneo and the Maylayan Archepelago. Eng- 
ih commentary. 86 min. 

EAPOLITAN CAROUSEL (IFE) (Lux Film, Rome) Pathe- 
ilor. Print by Technicolor. Sophia Loren, Leonid* 
assin*. Director Ettore Giannini. Musical. The history 
Naples traced from 1600 to date in song and dance. 



REMEMBER. MY LOVE I Artists-Producers Assoc.) Cine- 
maScope, Technicolor. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer. 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

SMOLDERING SEA, THE Superscope. Producer Hal E. 
Chester. Drama. Conflict between the tyrannical cap- 
tain and crew of an American merchant ship reaches 
its climax during battle of Guadalcanal. 

WEAPON, THE Superscope. Nicole Maurey. Producer 
Hal E. Chester. Drama. An unsolved murder involving 
a bitter U. S. war veteran, a German war bride and a 
killer is resolved after a child finds a loaded gun in 
bomb rubble 



M ETRO -GO LDWYN - MAYER 



November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, Bob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
87 min. 1/21. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME, THE Tom Ewell, Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 

TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON, THE Cinema- 
Scope, Eastman Color. Marlon Brando, Glenn Ford. 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Comedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 
123 min. 10/2?. 

January 

ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson, Martine Carol, Gustave Rojo. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. Beautiful girl seeks help of con- 
traband runner to rescue brother from Communists. 

EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 85 min. 1/7. 

SLANDER Van Johnson, Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutsch. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 8 1 min. 1/7. 

February 

BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET, THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gielgud. Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. Love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 105 min. 1/21. 

HOT SUMMER NIGHT Leslie Nielsen, Coleen Miller. 
Producer Morton Fine. Director David Friedkin. Melo- 
drama. Story of a gangland hide-out. 86 min. 2/4. 

WINGS Of THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne, Dan 
Dailey, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. Life and times of a naval 
aviator. I 10 min. 2/4. 

March 

HAPPY ROAD, THE Gene Kelly, Michael Redgrave, 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors, Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 
100 min. 2/4. 

LIZZIE Eleanor Parker, Richard Boone, Joan Blondell. 
Producer Jerry Bressler. Director Hugo Haas. Drama. 
A young girl lives three different lives. 

TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberghetti. Producer 
Joseph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 
A hotel tycoon falls in love with a lovely Italian girl. 
114 min. 2/18. 

Coming 

DESIGNING WOMAN Gregory Peck, Lauren Bacall. 
Dolores Gray. Producer Dore Schary. Director Vincente 
Minnelli. Ace sportswriter marries streamlined blond 
with ideas. 100 min. 

LITTLE HUT, THE MetroColor. Ava Gardner, Stewart 
Granger. Producers F. Hugh Herbert. Director Mark 
Robson. Comedy. Husband, wife and wife's lover are 
marooned on a tropical isle. 93 min. 

LIVING IDOL, THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Al Lewin. Drama. An archeologist is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle I800's. 

SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson, Dana Wynter, 
Wendy Hlller. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. Stry of a Mau Mau uprising 
in Kenya, East Africa. 

THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT Jean Simmons, Paul 
Douglas. Comedy. A girl fresh out of college gets a 
iob as secretary to an ex-bootlegger. 

VINTAGE, THE Pier Angeli, Mel Ferrer, Leif Erickson. 
Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Jeffrey Hayden. Dra- 
ma. A conflict between young love and mature re- 
sponsibility. 



PARAMOUNT 



November 

MOUNTAIN, THE VistaVision. Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane has 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in the 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about the 
movies. 95 min. 12/10. 

WAR AND PEACE VistaVisioi Technicolor Aua'.v 
Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer. Proaucers Carit 
Ponfi Dino oe Laurenriis Director <ing Vic"r. Drama 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 

January 

THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 
100 min. 1/7. 

February 

RAINMAKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster, Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 

March 

FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden, 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of the Boston baseball player. 
100 min. 2/18. 

OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget. Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure. 
The life and times of medieval Persia's literary idol. 
103 min. 

A pril 

FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audrey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens. Director Stanley Donen. Musical. Photographer 
plucks fashion model from Greenwich Vilfage bookshop. 
103 min. 2/18. 

Coming 

BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N.Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 105 min. 

BUSTER KEATON STORY, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. Life of the great comedian. 
DELICATE DELINQUENT, THE Jerry Lewis, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. Janitor longs to be police officer so he 
can help delinquents. 101 min. 

GUNFIGHT AT O.K. CORRAL VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallis. Director John Sturges. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his cheating 

brother 122 min. 

JOKER IS WILD, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Frank 
Sinatra, Mitzi Gaynor, Jeanne Crain. Producer Samuel 
Briskin. Director Chaj-les Vidor. Drama. Film biography 
of Joe E. Lewis, nightclub comedian. 

LONELY MAN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Perkins, Elaine Aiken. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he is losing his sight — and his aim. 



Film BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



SPANISH AFFAIR Vista Vision, Technicolor Carmen 
Sevilla, Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director 
Donald Siegel. 

TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE VistaVision Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, Anne Bax»e>\ Producer- 
director Cecil 8. DeMille. Religious drama. Life storv 

of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 219 min 10/15 



TIN STAR, THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda 
Perkins. A PerlSerg-Seaton Production Di 
thony Mann. V . .tern. 



nthony 



November 



A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 
CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope. Trucolor 
Johanna Matz, Rudolf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intrigue and mystery in Vienna durinq 
the time of Prince Metternich. 90 min. 



December 



ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor, Naturama. David 
Brian Vera Halston. Melodrama. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland 
lawyer is murdered by attractive girl singer 74 min 
Wr 0 ^ 0 » V '!i NNA Trucolor. Heinz Roettinger, Robert 
Kil hck. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal Romances and triumphs of Franz Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 

January 

£L°„M ^ ™! V! AWS John Mills . John Gregson, 
Donald Sinden. Producer W. MacQulrty. Director Ralpn 
Thomas. Drama M.dget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWII. 92 min 1/21 

1wh S S ! M r° N . Edstman Color - D ™<* Farrar. 
tion np"-i ' v Arn A a "' A J - Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child stolen. 91 min. 



February 



fon FA 'p R ^ N """Si Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G Sprinq- 

ga'mble?^ min 9 hefre " fa " S f °' ^^^9 

Maria A^h^ 6 Natura ™. Trucolor. Anna 

Mana Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
find /.fib J ?^^ u^' Wes * ern - Son returns home to 
70 min 5 threaiened by rustler-turned-rancher. 

March 

E L : S f ? R «! SSR ? A u DS Naturama. Stephen McNally. 

.ton 9 n- Ro ^ rt Vauhgn - frod ""' R«dy Ral- 

ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after fining Jesse James' gang. 73 min 
SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Trucolor, Naturama. Vera 
Ralston, Rod Cameron. Producer-director Joe Kane 
urama. An unscrupulous lumberman tries to coerce the 

wf rS °, 1 ' arge forest acrea ge into cutting their 
timber at a faster rate. 



November 

DEATH OF A SCOUNDREL George Sanders. Yvonne 
DeCarlo, Zsa Zsa Gabor. Producer-director Gharles 
Martin. Melodrama. Tale of an international financial 
wizard. I 19 min. 11/12. 

December 

MAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg. Bill Campbell, 
Karen Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A young locksmith gets 
mvolved ^w^ith a group engaged in illegal activities. 

January 

BRAVE ONE, THE CinemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
Ray, Ferrnin Rivera, Joy Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. Pro- 
ducer Frank & Maurice King. Director Irving Rapper. 
Drama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
irows up with a bull as his main companion and friend 
and how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 
BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope. Eastman Color. Debbie 
Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Adolph Meniou. Producer Ed- 
mund Grainger. Director Norman Tauroc Comedy. 
Son of department store magnet falls f" salesqirl 
98 min. 12/24. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 
YOUNG STRANGER. THE James MacArthur, Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Franken- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 
parents. 84 min. 2/18. 



February 



CYCLOPS. THE James Craig, Gloria Talbot. Produ 
director Bert Gordon. Science-fiction. Story of a i 
ster moon. 



SILKEN AFFAIR. THE David Niven, Genevieve Page, 
Ronald Squire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director Roy 
Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on a kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 min. 

THAT NIGHT John Beal, Augusta Dabney, Sbepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Director John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a 15- 
year-old marriage. 

X— THE UNKNOWN Dean Jagger, William Russell. 
Producer A. Hinds. Director Leslie Norman. Science- 
fiction. Keen minded scientist fights awesome creation. 



March 



Coming 



CARTOUCHE Richard Basehart, Patricia Roc. Producer 
John Nasht. Director Steve Sekelv. Adventure. The 
story of a lusty adventurer during the reign of Louis 
XVI. 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY. THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 
ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY. THE Eastman Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson, Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublin. 
Director Mitchell Leison. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking second place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 
JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hughes Production. Producer 
Ju'es Furthman Director Josef von SternBero. Drama. 
I 19 min. 

RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 

UNHOLY WIFE. THE Oolor. Diana Dors, Kod Steiger, 
Marie Windsor. Producer-director John Farrow. Drama. 
A wife sunningly plots the death of her husband who 
she has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS. THE Arthur O'Connell, Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director Jehn Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



November 



DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN. THE Robert Arthur, Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 
73 min. I 1/26. 

LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley. Richard 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentucky 
locale. 89 min. I 1/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope. Technicolor. Gordon Mac- 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn- 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza- 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 



December 



ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg- 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler. 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Fiimization of famous 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 

BLACK WHIP, THE Hugh Marlowe, Adele Mara. Pro- 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. Outlaw 
has black whip as trademark. 77 min. 
GIRL CAN'T HELP IT, THE CinemaScope, De Luxe 
Color. Tom Ewell, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-director 
Frank Tashtin. Comedy. Satire on rock 'n' roll. 97 
min. I/T. 

OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michele Morgan, Cornell 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd Os- 
wald. Director Yve-s Allgret. Drama. Gold smuggler 
falls in love with lady sent to kill him. Violent ending. 
84 min. 1/21. 

WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. James 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Production. 
Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 



January 



OUIET GUN. THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mara 
Corday. Producer-director Anthony Kimmlns. Western. 
Laramie sheriff clashes with notorious gunman. 77 min. 
THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Mllland, Ernest 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Philip 
Dunne. Drama. Government employee is wronged by 
too-zealous pursuit of security program. 88 min. 1/21. 



February 



BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina Lotlobrigida, Vit- 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Director 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

OH. MEN I OH, WOMENI CinemaScope, Color. Dan 
Dairy, Ginger Rogers, David Niven. Producer-director 
Nunnally Johnson. Comedy. A psychiatrist finds out 
somethings he didn't know. 

THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope. 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herbert 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The lives 

and times of America's outlaw gang. 92 min. 2/18. 
TWO GROOMS FOR A BRIDE Virginia Bruce. John 
Carroll. Producer Robert Baker, Monty Berman. Direc- 
tor Henry Cass. Comedy. 



HEAVEN KNOWS MR. ALLISON CinemaScope De 
Color. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Produc 
Buddy Adler, Eugene Frenke. Director John Hu 
Drama. Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific du 
World War II. 

RIVER'S EDGE, THE CinemaScope, Color. Ray Mill 
Anthony Quinn, Debra Paget. Producer Ben 
Bogeans. Director Allan Dwan. Adventure. Story 
professional killer. 

STORM RIDER, THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers 
Brady-Glasser production. Director Edward Bern 
Western. A dust storm brings a stranger to 
western town. 



April 



CHINA GATE Nat "King" Cole. Gene Barry, An 
Dickinson. Producer-director S. Fuller. Drama. 
KRONOS Jeff Morrow, Barbara Lawrence, John Erne 
Producer-director Kurt Neumann. Drama. 

Coming 

ALL THAT I HAVE Walter Brennan. 



BERNADINE Terry Moore, Pat Boone, Janet 
Producer Sam Engel, Director H. Levin. 

BOY ON A DOLPHIN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Col 
Clifton Webb, Alan Ladd, Sophia Loren. Produ 
Engel. Director Jean Negulesco. Cdmedy. Roman 
tale with a Greek background. 



ISLAND IN THE SUN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Co 
James Mason, Joan Fontaine, Dorothy Dandridge. 
ducer DarryJ Zanuck. Director Robert Rossen. Dra 

LURE OF THE SWAMP William Parker, Skippy Home! 
Marshall Thompson. 

RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brad 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director 
Dwan. 

SEA WIFE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Richard 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarin 
off Singapore harbor. 



SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Ri 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Produc 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussii 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 97 min. 2/18. 

THREE FACES OF EVE, THE David Wayne, Joann 
Woodward. Producer Nunnally Johnson. 

WAY TO THE GOLD, THE Sheree North, Barry Su 
Jeffrey Hunter. Producer David Weisbart. Director 
Webb. 



UNITED ARTISTS 



November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness, Angle Di 
son, Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Directo 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunma; 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him 
wounded. 78 min. 

PEACEMAKER, THE James Mitchell, Rosemarie Bowe 
Jan Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post. 
Western. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattl 
men and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 
RUNNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dow 
Arthur Pranz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Cou 
Director Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped 
fives are chased by local townspeople and officer 
the law. 83 min. 11/12. 
SHARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe, Color. Victor 
Mature, Karen Steele. Produc-r Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 
Director Jerry Hopper. Drar Saga of the Navy's 
"underwater-men". 73 min. I0;l'f. 

December 

BRASS LEGEND. THE Hugh O'Brien. Raymond Burr, 
Nancy Gates. Western. Producer Bob Goldstein. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Western. 79 min. 
DANCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. 
Producer Robert Goldstein, Director Charles Barton. 
Comedy. 79 min. 12/24. 

KING AND FOUR QUEENS, THE CinemaScope, Color. 
Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willis, 
Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 
stead. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 1/7. 
WILD PARTY. THE Anthony Ouinn, Carol Ohmart, Paul 
Stewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 
Horner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval offi- 
cer and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 

January 

BIG BOODLE, THE Errol Flynn, Rossana Rory. A Lewis 
F. Blumberg Production. Director Richard Wilson. Ad- 
venture. A blackjack dealer in a Havana nightclub is 
accused of being a counterfeiter. 83 min. 2/4. 



Film BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



VE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Reman, Sterling Hayden. 

t Grand Production. Director Henry Keller Drama, 
woman tries to five FBI highly secret material stolen 

Bpffl Russians. 80 min. 2/4. 

ALLIDAY BRAND, THE Joseph Corten, Viveca Lind- 
rs, Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
iseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
ther and son with disaster. 77 min. 2/4. 

February 

RIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling 
• eyden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen. Di- 
ictor Gerd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 

■nbition for her husband leads to murder. 85 min. 1/7. 
RA4JGO Jeff Chandler. Joanne Dru. An Earlmar Pro- 
uttion. Hall Barflett producer-director. Adventure, 
nion officers try to bring order to a Southern town 
Iter the Civil War. 92 min. 

I EN IN WAR Robert Ryan. Aldo Ray, Robert Keith, 
roducer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann, 
rema An American infantry platoon isolated in enemy 
•rritory tries to retreat during the Korean War. 
i 01 min. 2/4. 

OMAHAWK TRAIL John Smith, Susan Cummings. A 
el Air Production. Director Robert Parry. Western 
k)wboy versus Indians. A small band of cavalry 
oldiers, greatly outnumbered, battles with Apache 
. ndians at close of the Civil War. 61 min 

ODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff. Beverly Tyler. A Bel 
; dr Production. Director Reginald Le Borg. Horror. 
jWlter is called upon to investigate vodooism on a 
l acific isle. 74 min. 

March 

IACHELOR PARTY, THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall, 
ack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 
*<fann. Drama. From the famous television drama by 
'addy Chayefsky. 

)ELI NOUENTS. THE Tommy Laughlin, Peter Miller, 
)ick Bakalyan. Imperial Productions. Robert Airman 
tJirector. High school student and his girl victimized 
>y a teen-age gang. 71 min. 

HIDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
Aubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth. 
)rama Police officer attempts to clear sister charged 
»ith murder. 

HIT AND RUN Qeo Moore, Hugo Haas. Producer, di- 
rector Hugo Haas. Middle-aged widower marries show 
girl. She and her boy friend plot his murder. 84 min. 

REVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Dehner, Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
rector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
soldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 min. 

April 

GIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS. THE Lex Barker, Anne 
Bancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production. Di- 
rector Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slayings 
terrorize western resort. 

MONTE CARLO STORY, THE Technirama, Color. Mar- 
lene Dietrich, Vittorio De Sica. A Titanus Film. Sam 
Taylor director. Drama. A handsome Italian nobleman 
with a love for gambling marries a rich woman in 
order to pay his debts. 

Coming 

BAILOUT AT 43.000 John Payne, Karen Steele. A Pine- 
Thomas Production. Director Francis Lyon. U.S. Air 
Force pioneers bailout mechanism for jet pilots. 
BIG CAPER. THE Rory Calhound. Mary Costa. Pine- 
Thomas Production. Director Robert Stevens. Multi- 
million dollar payroll robbery. 

CARELESS YEARS, THE Natalie Trundy, Dean Stock- 
well. Producer Edward Lewis. Director Arthur Hiller. 
IRON SHERIFF. THE Sterling Hayden,, John Dehner, 
Constance Ford. Producer Jerome Robinson. Director 
Sidney Salkow. 

LONELY GUN, THE Anthony Ouinn, Katy Jurado. Pro- 
ducer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 
MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD. THE 

Science-fiction. Deals with a prehistoric sea monster. 
OUTLAW'S SON Dane Clark, Ben Cooper, Lori Nel- 
son. Bel Air Production. Director Lesley Selander. Gun- 
slinger escapes from jail to save son from life of 
crime. 

PHAROAH'S CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Howard Koch. Director Lea Sholem. Horror. Reincar- 
nation of mummies in Egyptian tombs. 44 min. 2/18 
PRIDE AND THE PASSION. THE VistaVision, Techni- 
color. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren. Pro- 
ducer-director Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
guerrilla band marches an incredible distance with a 
sOOO pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
ence of 1810. 

SAVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor. Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
A Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
Falls in love with a peasant who contests her right 
to rule the kingdom. 101 min. 

STREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery, Geraldine 
Brooks. Producer William Berke. Rookie policeman 
clashes with youthful criminals. 

SPRING REUNION Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews, Jean 
Hagen. Director Robert Pirosh. Producer Jerry Bresler. 
Comedy. 7? min. 

fROOPER HOOK Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck, Ed- 
ward Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marquis 
Warren. A white woman, forced to live as an Indian 
Ohief's squaw, is finally rescued and tries to resume 
life with husband. 

12 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb Jack 
Warden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sidney 
Lumet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 



U N I VERSA L- 1 NT' L 



November 

UNGUARDED MOMENT. THE Technicolor Esther Wil- 
liams, George Nader. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Drama. High school teacher is almost 
criminally assaulted by student. IS min. 9/3. 

December 

CURCU. BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
Bromfield, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay, 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siodnak. Horror. Young 
woman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
are terrorized by mysterious juggle beast. 

EVERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
Maureen O'Hara, John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
dent gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 11/12. 

MOLE PEOPLE. THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror. 
Scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 

January 

FOUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
George Nader, Julie Adams, Marianne Cook. Producer 
A. Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
85 min. 12/10 

ROCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo, John Saxon, Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
Bartlett. Musical. Rock n' roll story of college combo. 
8? min. I 1/24. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
Lauren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
smith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
violent death because of jealousy for wife. 99 min. 10/1 

February 

GREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
rer. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
idol. 92 min. 11/2-6. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope, Technicolor. Errol Flynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 84 min. 1/21. 

NIGHT RUNNER, THE Ray Danton, Cqlleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Blberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 

March 

BATTLE HYMN Technicplor, CinemaScope. Rock Hud- 
son, Martha Hyer, Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. 
Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of 
guilt because of bombing of an orphanage by saving 
other orphans. 108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD astman Color, CinemaScope. 
Fred MacMurray, Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Abner Biberman. Wes- 
tern. Three brothers run a cattle ranch after death of 
their father. 88 min. 1/7. 

MISTER CORY Eastman Color, CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford. Producer 
Robert Arthur. Director Blake Edwards. Drama. Gam- 
bler from Chicago *Jums climbs to wealth and re- 
spectability. 92 min. 1/21. 

A pril 

INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, THE Grant Williams, 
Randy Stuart. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack 
Arnold. Science-fiction. The story of a man whose 
growth processes have accidently been reversed. 
81 min. 2/4. 

KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son, Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of dog- 
act in show business in the early I930*s. 2/4. 
TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arnold. Melodrama. Famous criminal 
lawyer gains humility when put on trial himself. 

Coming 

APPOINTMENT WITH A SHADOW CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Marisa Pavan. Producer Robert Arthur. Director 
Joseph Pevney. Drama. Rookie cop seeks murderer of 
parish priest. 

DEADLY MANTIS, THE Craig Stevens, Alix Talton. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Jerry Juran. Horror. 
Monstrous creature threatens to destroy U.S. 
INTERLUDE Technicolor, CinemaScope. June Allyson, 
Rossano Brazzi. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. American doctor falls in love with wife of fa- 
mous composer in Munich. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy, George Nader, Keenan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. ?tory of 
American newsmen in Tokyo after Japanese surrender. 
JOE DAKOTA Color. Jock Mahoney, Luana Patten. Pro- 
ducer Howard Christie. Director Richard Bartlett. 
Drama. Stranger makes California oil town see the 
error of its ways. 

LAND UNKNOWN, THE Jock Mahoney, Shawn Smith. 
Producer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. 
Science-fiction. Polar expedition finds Mesozoic age 
in Antartic expedition. 

MAN AFRAID CinemaScope. George Nader, Phyllis 
Thaxter, Tim Hovey. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Father saves life of man attempting to 
murder his son. 



MAN OF A THOUSAND FACES CinemaScope. James 
Cagney, Dorolhy Malone. Producer Robert Arthur. Di- 
rector Joseph Pevney. Drama. Life story of Lon Chaney. 

NIGHT PASSAGE Technirama. James Stewart, Audie 
Murphy, Dan Duryea. Producer A. Rosenberg. Director 
James Neilsr>n. Drama. Payroll robbers are foiled by 
youngster and tough-fisted railroader. 

PAY THE DEVIL CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, Orson 
Welles. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack Ar- 
nold. Drama. Sheriff destroys one-man domination of 

pUANTEZ CinemaScope. Eastman Color. Fred Mac- 
Murray Dorothy Malone. Producer Gordon Kay. Direc- 
tor Harry Keller. Drama. A study of five people in- 
volved in a robbery and killing. 

TAMMY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds. 
Leslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Rosenb'jro. Director 
Joe Pevney. Story of a young girl, her grandfather and 
a young man who falls in love with her. 89 min. 



WARNER BROTHERS 



November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor, Rock Hudson. 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens. Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil, cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND, THE Tab Hunter. Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler. Drama. Army turns immature boy into man 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BABY DOLL Karl Maiden, Carroll Baker, Eli Wallach. 
A Newton Production. Producer-director Elia Kazan. 
Drama. Story of a gin-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. 1 14 min. 12/24. 

January 

WRONG MAN. THE Henry Fonda, Vera Miles. Anthony 
Ouayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club is prime suspect in 
murder case. 105 min. 1/7. 

February 

BIG LAND. THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd, Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move their herds to 
distant railroads. 93 min. 2/4. 

TOP SECRET AFFAIR Kirk Douglas, Susan Hayward. 
Producer Martin Rackin. Director H. C. Potter. Come- 
dy. A lovely lady calls the bluff of an Army General. 
93 min. 2/4. 

March 

PARIS DOES STRANGE THINGS Technicolor. Ingrid 
Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco-London 
Rim. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of the exiled 
widow of a Polish Prince. 

A pril 

SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, THE CinemaScope, Warner- 
Color. James Stewart, Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director Billy Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlantic in a plane. 

Coming 

A FACE IN THE CROWD Andy Griffith. Patricia Neal. 
Producer-director Ella Kazan. Drama. 
LAFAYETTE ESCADRILLE CinemaScope. WarnerColor 
Tab Hunter, Etchlka Choureau, J. Carrol Naish. Drama. 
PRINCE AND THE SHOWGI3L, THE Color. Marilyn 
Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Dame Sybil Thorndyke. 
Producer-director Laurence Olivier. Comedy. 
UNTAMED YOUTH Mamie Van Doren. 



To Better Serve You . . . 

Office & Terminal Combined At 
305 N. 12th St. New Phone. 

Philadelphia 7, Pa. LOmbard 3-3944, 394S 

NEW JERSEY 
MESSENGER SERVICE 

Member National Film Carriers 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE! 

HIGHWAY 
EXPRESS LINES, INC. 

Member National Film Carriers 

Philadelphia, Pa.: LOcust 4-3459 
Washington. D. C: DUpont 7-7200 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



V7KXM I I MLCiM I IVlMIVEa V7RCH I riV I UKES 




Script conference for "The Helen Morgan Story," based on 
fabulous career of famed torch singer, brings co-stars Ann 
Blyth and Paul Newman together in meeting with producer 
Martin Rackin, director Michael Curtiz. (CinemaScope) 




Jack L. Warner and Benjamin Kalmenson, executive vice-fi 
ident Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. (right) congratulate* 
stars Doris Day, John Raitt and George Abbott, Stanley || 
nen on completion of "The Pajama Game" filming. Abbt 
Donen production of famed Broadway musical hit was! 
rected by Abbott and Donen from screenplay by AM 
and Richard Bissell. Frederick Brisson, Robert E. GrifiJ 
Harold S. Prince are production associates. (WarnerCoft 




It's back to deep South of Civil War era for 
Clark Gable, shown here with co-star Yvonne 
DeCarlo, in "Band of Angels," explosive romantic 
drama based on Robert Penn Warren best-seller. 
Raoul Walsh directs picture, now locationing in 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, from screenplay by 
John Twist and Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts. 



Star Andy Griffith and producer-director Mervyn 
LeRoy study script of "No Time for Sergeants" 
as filming starts on laugh hit which has convulsed 
world as novel and Broadway audiences as com- 
edy stage success. Hilarious tale being brought 
to screen as LeRoy production with Griffith play- 
ing original stage role. John Lee Mahin wrote 
the screenplay based on Mac Hyman novel. 



Satan, played by Vincent Price, is up a tree 
in argument with Spirit of Man, enacted by 
Ronald Colman, in "The Story of Man- 
kind." More than 50 famous name players 
appear in film based on Hendrik Van Loon's 
nternational best-seller. Picture is pro- 
duced, directed by Irwin Allen, who also 
wrote screenplay with Charles Bennett. 
(WarnerColor, print by Technicolor) 



Co-stars Karl Maiden, Natalie Wood, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Jr., watch spectacular takeoff of 
sky-giant (above) during March Field loca- 
tion filming of "Bombers B-52." Thrilling 
scenes of globe-girdling B-52s, mightiest 
weapon of U.S. Air Force, highlight drama 
directed by Gordon Douglas, produced by 
Richard Whorf from screenplay by Irving 
Wallace. (CinemaScope and WarnerColor) 





WE'RE DOING THINGS HERE AT WARNER BROS. 



1% 

BULLETIN 



HARCH 18, 1957 



Business-wise 
Analysis of 
Hie New Films 

Reviews : 

HEAVEN KNOWS, 
MR. ALLISON 

SPRING REUNION 

THE STRANGE ONE 

TARZAN AND THE 
LOST SAFARI 

THE VINTAGE 

THE DELINOUENTS 

GOLD OF NAPLES 

TEARS FOR SIMON 



Hire Help to 
Build Business 



Viewpoint 



JVhy Isn 9 t The Public 
Buying Movie Stacks? 

Read FINANCIAL 



AN ANNOUNCEMENT FROM 20th CENTURY- FOX 




DUAL 

ENGAGEMENT 
NOW 




THEATRE 
New York 

A 

THEATRE 
Los Angeles 




¥ 



Produced by 

Buddy Adler 
Eugene Frenke 

by JohnHuston 

Screenplay by John Lee Mahin and John Huston 



Directed 



viewpoints 

MARCH 18, 1957 * VOLUME 25, NO. 6 



JMirv ###>/// 
lo Build 

Business 

The foreword to the 39-page re- 
port of the Joint COMPO-MPAA- 
TOA Business Building Committee 
refers to "a project that has been the 
center of the thoughts, the energies 
and the hopes of the industry's ad- 
vertising and publicity men — both 
distribution and exhibition — for the 
last nine months." 

Actually, the problem of building 
theatre motion picture business has 
occupied industry attention for a 
good deal longer than nine months. 
What makes the Joint Committee's 
report more noteworthy than the 
long months of deliberation preced- 
ing it is the fact that at last the in- 
dustry has come to grips with a 
practical program seeking to stimu- 
late theatre attendance. 

With the exception of a pending 
market research survey for which 
the MPAA hired an outside organi- 
zation, the people who prepared the 
program and the people who will ad- 
minister it are all connected with the 
motion picture industry. The adver- 
tising agency which the report pro- 
poses to handle a $320,000 national 
radio advertising campaign is a well 
established, highly regarded agency 
with major motion picture company 
clients. In other phases of the pro- 
gram, such as visits by industry rep- 
resentatives to newspaper editors, 
there is no specific identification of 
the people who would do the job. 

The question raised here is a very 
basic one. While COMPO very 
properly has served — and should 
continue to serve — as a coordinating 
agency and a central office for much 
of the work, the proposal made in 
the report is that a national operat- 
ing committee from exhibition, 
MPAA and COMPO be appointed 
to conduct the program through 
COMPO. This presupposes a con- 



tinuing division of time by commit- 
tee members between their own 
company's assignments and the in- 
dustry-wide business-building pro- 
gram, just as elsewhere the radio 
concept suggests an agency which 
will serve both the entire industry 
and its individual accounts. 

The report is emphatic in insisting 
that the radio "campaign be handled 
nationally. Nevertheless, before the 
buy is made, local exhibitors would 
be advised so that they can get up 
'plus' treatment." This, it seems to 
us, calls for an organization that 
serves all portions and segments of 
the motion picture industry equally. 

We believe that in the long run 
one of the great difficulties in the 
entire business-building project will 
be the degree to which the industry 
attempts to utilize people who are 
already working at full-time jobs for 
individual companies, whether dis- 
tribution or exhibition. The task of 
our industry's advertising manpower 
is more difficult today than ever be- 
fore. They are grappling with new 
problems, seeking new approaches 
to the promotion of pictures as they 
strive to meet the vagaries and 
preferences of a highly selective 
market. The demands on their time 
and effort are enormous. And apart 
from the conflicting pressures of 
time and the special interests of their 
individual employers, these men all 
have continuing special relationships 
which must be taken into account. 
They deal with certain customers or 




Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trade Paper 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax, Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 123? Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa., LOcust 8-0950, 0951. 
Philip R. Ward, Associate Editor- Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan G. 
Steck, Business Manager; Marvin Schiller, 
Publication Manager; Robert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: 522 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 36, N. Y., MUrray Hill 2-3631; 
Alf Dinhofer, Editorial Representative. 
Subscription Rates: ONE YEAR, S3. 00 
in the U. S.; Canada, $4.00; Europe, 
S5.00. TWO YEARS: $5.00 in the 
U. S.; Canada, $7.50; Europe, S?.00. 



suppliers; they drive hard bargains 
with one man, and find themselves 
in the position of providing some in- 
dustry help that cozies them up with 
this man's competitor. 

It not intended as a reflection on 
any individuals to say that divided 
allegiance will be inevitable. A man 
who works for an entire industry 
has a different loyalty than the man 
who works for a single company. It 
would be naive indeed to ignore the 
fact that in our own industry there 
is plenty of industry politics and 
plenty of intramural pressure. Under 
such circumstances, wouldn't the 
wise thing be to retain outside spe- 
cialists responsible only to the in- 
dustry as a whole? Surely, if we can 
afford a business-building program 
at all, we can afford to do it the right 
way. 

And we should remember that we 
are not just making a decision for a 
few months. The business-building 
campaign must be year-round and 
year after year. With this under- 
standing, we should be able to mus- 
ter an organization stronger than 
any single company or collection of 
companies — or collection of organi- 
zations, for that matter — can provide 
from their already fully-worked 
rosters. 

Let's not burden our advertising 
executives, whose job is already a 
tough one in today's market. If the 
business-building program is to get 
all the attention it needs and de- 
serves, outside help should be hired 
to do the work — under the super- 
vision of our experts. 

L,oak in 4a 
Wiretl TV 

Let us face it. The Federal Com- 
munications Commission has been 
regarding subscription television as 
a sort of hot potato, but meanwhile 
time has not been standing still. The 
southwest, where so many movie 
(Continued on Page. 16) 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 3 



SOMETHING'S 
GOING 
TO 

POPS 



Our Campaign 
Will Reach 
a Total of 
356,570,617 
Impressions 
in Magazines, 
Newspapers, 
on TV and 
Radio! 




CHAMPAGNE 
? F PICTURES 



CAMPAIGN OF THE YEAR 

for the 'Champagne" of the Year! 

MAGAZINES: Full page in Life (2 colors), 
Look, Saturday Evening Post (2 colors), Seven- 
teen, Vogue, Charm, New Yorker and a full 
page in all the leading fan magazines. Plus 
M-G-M's famed "Picture of the Month" column 
in Cosmopolitan, McCall's and Redbook. 
101,375,385 total readership. 

NEWSPAPERS: Teaser series to appear for 5 
days prior to opening on women's and society 
pages of 61 papers in 45 cities. Total reader- 
ship nearly 200,000,000. Plus M-G-M's big 
display and co-operative newspaper campaigns 
with untold circulation in the hundreds of 
millions. 

TV AND RADIO: Radio spots in 26 markets 
producing 24,689,232 listener impressions 
over a 3-week period. Star spots on TV featur- 
ing Gregory Peck and Lauren Bacall, telecast 
to 36 big-city markets, going into 14,5 26,648 
homes with 30,506,000 viewers. 



"TASTING IS 
BELIEVING!" 




THEATRE 
PREVIEWS! 

M-G-M cordially invites you to sample this bubbling 
"Champagne of Pictures" at its Invitational Theatre 
Previews. Watch for your invitation which will tell you 
the date and theatre in your Exchange City. This picture 
is literally a Happy Toast to your Box -Office! And 
M-G-M is telling your patrons about "The newspaper 
guy, the chic fashion designer and the shapely showgirl." 



M-G-M presents the Comedy of the Year — with Songs! 

GREGORY PECK 
LAUREN BACALL 

DESIGNING WOMAN 

Co-Starring 

DOLORES GRAY 

Written by GEORGE WELLS, Associate Producer 
in CINEMASCOPE ond METROCOLOR 
Directed by VINCENTE MINNELLI 
Produced by DORE SCHARY 

★ 

(Available in Magnetic Stereophonic, Perspecta Steraophonic or 1-Channel Sound) 



TELEMOVIES. Whether or not the theaftre-to-home 
movies-via-cable idea will ultimately prove to be the "hope 
for the future of the motion picture business," as expressed 
. by one circuit executive, remains to be seen. Conceivably, 
• it could turn out to be a complete bust. But there's no 
"denying that theatremen everywhere are paying strict at- 
tention to this new threat or promise, whichever way one 
chooses to see it. Advocates of the closed-circuit system 
confidently predict that the basic consideration of con- 
venience — sitting at home and having the latest films piped 
into the living room — make "telemovies" a sure-fire bet to 
replace the theatre. Costwise, they argue, the patron will 
save plenty of money, since an entire family can watch the 
show for one "admission". Doubters have their points, too. 
Movies brought into the home will be a pallid, miniature 
replica of the big-screen show offered at the theatre, they 
say. One highly regarded film executive told us that in his 
opinion, the whole pattern of movies as we have known 
them for so long would change to meet the limitations of 
the small home screen. Scope and action would be severly 
constricted in production for closed-circuit exhibition, and 
everything would tend toward diminution. "Big-scale 
moviemaking would be a thing of the past," he said. 
"Everything made would be of what today we call 'quickie' 
calibre." Those who question the feasibility of "tele- 
movies" also make a point of the "admission" factor. Ten 
dollars a month, or some such fixed charge, may not seem 
like much, but they ask how many people in the vast mass 
audience will be willing to contract for "pig in a poke" 
entertainment at such a price. No doubt about it, the im- 
ponderables in the idea of cabled movies are many. Only 
time will provide the answers. 

0 

BRING 'EM BACK ALIVE. Strong currents are in the 
wind for reintroducing live talent on the movie theatre 
stage. Principle push behind this idea — much in vogue in 
the early 1940's with the name bands — is the dizzy rise of 
rock 'n roll performers to national popularity. Already 
many big-city theatres have booked rock 'n roll revues 
either with a rock 'n roll picture, or as a substitute. The 
results, despite the fact that the talent in many instances, 
has been third-rate, have been surprisingly good. Some 
say it can be attributed strictly to the rock 'n' roll craze, 
while others insist that there exists a widespread hunger 
for live entertainment. With the gradual diminishing of 
cafes and night spots around the country, the movie thea- 
tre stage seems a natural for giving talent a chance to show 
its stuff. And the fast-grown TV personalities can be re- 
garded as offering a huge fund of boxoffice names for p. a. 
work. Don't be surprised if the trend toward live shows 
to supplement films really booms next Fall. 

0 

WHAT'S DOING BUSINESS? Grosses have been ex- 
ceedingly "soft" in recent weeks, and are expected to re- 
main so until Easter. Among the boxoffice disappoint- 
ments: "Spirit of St. Louis," "Wings of the Eagles," 
"Rainmaker," "Iron Petticoat," "Full of Life" — all boast- 
ing strong marquee names and at least two of them rated 



What They'te hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



as top-drawer films. Exhibitors say they just couldn't 
work up any enthusiasm for them. "Full of Life," we're 
told, slips into a theatre with little advance buildup, gets 
fine audience response, but fails to do any business. What's 
wrong, boys! Has the practice of selling pictures gone to 
pot? Columbia is acting almost as if it is ashamed of the 
Judy Holliday starrer. It got absolutely no advance indus- 
try buildup. And exhibition's lethargy about it abounds. 
On the brighter side is 20th-Fox's "Heaven Knows, Mr. 
Allison", which opened in very lively style at the Roxy. 
Looks like it will be the smash Easter attraction. "Battle 
Hymn" (Universal) is giving a good account of itself, as 
is the same company's "Written on the Wind", now in the 
sub-runs. And if anyone still needs proof that showman- 
ship pays off, let them take a gander at the grossing power 
of Mike Todd's "80 Days" and Paramount's sturdy "Ten 
Commandments". Big, yes, but sold big. 

0 

NEW ADS FOR "SPIRIT". The advertising campaign on 
"Spirit of St. Louis" is undergoing changes. It seems that 
the public did not respond so readily to the presentation 
of the Leland Hayward production as the biography of 
Charles E. Lindberg, national hero. Warner ad chief Gil 
Golden has thrown out the original campaign and drafted 
a new jazzed-up one that lays emphasis on the "flaming 
20's" era during which Lindy undertook his solo flight 
across the Atlantic. Golden is credited with having boosted 
the gross on Warners "The Bad Seed" a couple million 
dollars by a campaign switch. 

O 

NEW ATTACK ON ADVERTISING. A new twist was 
given the popular sport of attacking movie advertising 
when actress Arlene Dahl slapped a $1,000,000 suit against 
Columbia. The lovely star charged that the advertising in 
her latest film, "Wicked as They Come," is salacious and 
shows her "in obscene offensive and sexually suggestive 
poses which have no relationship to the motion picture." 
Miss Dahl puts the onus on the artists who started with a 
true likeness of her face and then proceeded to add a fe- 
male figure in "various phases of disrobement and in com- 
promising positions." A simple case of gilding the lily, 
we say. 

O 

TV BLOCK BOOKING. That old debil, block booking, 
is being investigated again by the Justice Department. 
This time it's the bulk sales of feature film packages to 
television stations. Current practice decrees, in most 
cases, that TV outlets take the entire package. Under in- 
vestigation is the question of conflict, if any, with the 1949 
Paramount consent decree. 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 5 



11 

Business 
Building 
Projects 



Eleven primary promotional projects were given the stamp of approval by 
the industry's Joint Business-Building Committee which met in New York on 
March 13. While some aspects of the long-range, attendance-building program 
must be regarded as tentative, the eleven approved recommendations — several 
of which are already underway — represent the first meaningful steps taken by 
all-industry representatives to produce a workable promotional program of value 
to every segment of the industry. 

In the foreward to its 39-page report the Joint Committee, representing 
COMPO, TOA and the MPA, said approval of the plans represent a "milestone 
in industry cooperation", and that with this program, "the Joint Working Com- 
mittee believes it has made a beginning on what can, and should, be developed 
into a continuing, expanding industry-wide endeavor that will have for its ob- 
jective an increase in theatre attendance and a better understanding by the pub- 
lic of the industry's problems and achievements". Following are outlined the 
eleven promotional projects approved by the Joint B-B Committee: 



1. Academy Award Sweepstakes, already in operation. 

2. Audience Awards, which will be held next fall. 

3. A community reel, a short subject which will be pro- 
duced to show to local merchants, service clubs, churches, 
schools and other civic groups that the local movie theatre 
is the best source of entertainment and that it has the ad- 
ditional merit of serving the community by bringing peo- 
ple out of their homes into contact with other retail busi- 
nesses and by helping churches, schools, clubs, charities. 

4. Product trailer. While it was deemed impracticable 
to have a trailer showing advance scenes from all the com- 
panies' coming pictures, it was revealed at the meeting that 
several companies plan to produce trailers showing parts 
of some of their coming pictures, and that these trailers 
would accomplish the same results which it had been 
hoped would result from an over-all trailer. 

5. Industry radio program. An interim part of this pro- 
gram is already in operation. This means that all com- 
panies producing radio transcriptions are including an in- 
stitutional spot as part of every platter. Copy for these in- 
stitutional spots comprises variations of a dialogue be- 
tween a man and his wife to the general effect that people 
should get out of their homes more and go to movie thea- 
tres for entertainment. 

The radio program also calls for nation-wide use of disc 
jockeys in a campaign with a tentative cost estimate of 
$319,697.33. Before this campaign is inaugurated, however, 
it was decided to conduct test campaigns of eight weeks 
each in Denver and possibly three other cities to determine 
the most effective methods of using radio including the 
kind of copy to use in the national campaign later. As now 
outlined, the national campaign calls for use of disc jockeys 
in 80 cities over a period of 13 weeks. Added up, the radio 
messages would total 16,800 and, it is estimated, would 
reach 80,039,600 homes. 

6. Personality tours. This project has two phases. The 
first is an extension of the personal appearance tours now 
being made by film personalities and the use by the per- 
sonalities, in their press and radio interviews, of material 
aimed at spreading the news that the business has turned 
the corner and is now markedly on the upgrade. The sec- 
ond phase calls for making available for visits to those ex- 
hibitors who will bear the expense production personalities 



such as writers, producers, directors, costume and scene 
designers. Such visits, it was pointed out, could be ar- J 
ranged by Clarke H. Wales of the Association of Motion 
Picture Producers in Hollywood. 

7. National Advertising Campaign for Theatres. The 
report stated that, "while the joint working committee i 
agreed in principle that such an advertising campaign 
aimed at selling the motion picture theatre as the best 
source of entertainment was 'desirable,' it was agreed no 
action should be taken pending a market survey report and 
development of a copy approach acceptable to the commit- 
tee." In the meantime company advertising in magazines ■ 
and in press books is carrying lines expressing the thought \ 
that "only on the motion picture theatre screen can you see i 
the brand new pictures." 

8. Visits to editors and publishers. This project entails 
the presentation of the industry's story, in a business-like, 
across-the-table manner, to editors and publishers, but only 
in those cities where the presentation is asked for by local i 
exhibitors. It was explained that the plan would be tried 
out first in three or four cities, not yet selected. 

9. Reduction of advertising billings. Long denounced 
by film company advertising men as a serious obstacle to 
good advertising, the company advertising billings will be 
the subject of a presentation that is now being prepared. 
This presentation will be taken shortly to Hollywood in an 
effort to get the billing requirements reduced. 

10. Market survey. This is now being conducted by the 
Opinion Research Corporation of Princeton, N. J., the sum 
of $75,000 having been appropriated for the job by the 
MPAA. The survey report is not expected to be made for \ 
at least three months. 

11. Implementation of the program. Emphasizing that 
formulation of the program will have been a waste of time 
unless machinery is set up for its execution as a continuing 
activity, the report adopted by the committee calls for es- 
tablishment of a five-man operating committee, to work in 
New York under the overall direction of the COMPO top 
management; appointment of permanent committees in 
each of the exchange cities and establishment of a liaison 
body in Hollywood that will have the approval and co- 
operation of Hollywood production personnel and studio 
publicity directors. 



Page 6 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



INVESTMENT SHRINKAGE. Had you placed a buy 
order one year ago for 100 shares of each of the eight 
major film companies, your broker would have mailed you 
a bill for $14,937.50, plus commissions and taxes. 

Liquidation of this portfolio on March 1, 1957, would 
have returned you $13,425.00 less brokerage commissions 
and taxes — or a net balance of minus $1,700 with service 
charges figured in. 

Between buying and selling, the postman would have 
delivered dividend checks amounting to $633.00, represent- 
ing a collective yield of 4.3% from the eight companies. 
0 

It is no wonder that movie industry venture capital is 
drying up. Only two elements, significantly, appear at- 
tracted to movie industry securities today according to a 
Financial Bulletin survey of 20 important Wall Street 
firms. These are the professional promoter, whose motives 
are privy to himself, and the rank speculator, the hunch 
player whose criteria consists of some vague notions that 
movie business "is coming back". 

Certainly moviedom shares have never been regarded as 
appropriate for trust funds or gentle old ladies, but they 
have exerted a lure over the years upon many a perspi- 
cacious investor seeking to add diversity and perhaps a bit 
of flair to his holdings. This market element is currently 
forsaking the motion picture industry for others of greater 
speculative fire, among them mining, oil, electronic and 
certain spheres of aircraft. 

Indeed, the loss of risk capital by the class called "in- 
formed speculator" is a condition that may work sore con- 
sequences upon moviedom in years to come. It is generally 
conceded that demand for film company shares has been 
flagging for several years. The enlightened risk-taker is 
looking elsewhere as the widespread notion prevails that 
movie business is losing its edge in the marketplace. As 
demand continues to wane, so accordingly does the price of 
stock. A careful reader of daily stock quotations will note 
several film companies, among them Universal, whose 
shares fail to make a market more often than not. It is not 
uncommon for Columbia Pictures to pass untraded or to 
show only 100 shares bought in a day. As one Wall Street- 
er expressed it: "The only substantial volume in movie 
stocks these days originates with promoters and potential 
proxy-fighters." 

O 

Though it may never have occurred to those who make 
industry policy, the slumping financial picture is not alone 
to blame for the current coolness toward film investment. 
They, the industry's leaders, are equally at fault. What, 
they should ask themselves, have they done to sell their 
enterprise to the public at large? What have they done to 
spark interest in the institution of movie-going? What 
have they done to encourage bearers of risk capital that the 
dynamics of growth and appreciation are still potential in 
the film business. Truth is they have lately been doing 
virtually nothing within their own industry — let alone on 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 

MARCH 18. 1957 



By Philip R. Ward 

the outside — to stimulate confidence in the future of film- 
dom. The film company executives (with the exception of 
a very few like Spyros Skouras, the dynamic 20th Century- 
Fox leader) exude an atmosphere of dispiritedness that 
spreads far beyond the bounds of the industry and 
frightens off investors. Seasoned observers down in Wall 
Street shake their heads sadly and speak disdainfully of 
movie executiveship that "has grown old and frightened", 
of the industry's "publicly announced defeatism", of the 
fact the "movie people have let television take the ball 
away from them and score at will". These are verbatim 
quotations from men who watch and advise prospective 
buyers on film securities. 

O 

Movie industry investment has shrunk in ratio with the 
shrinkage of confidence issuing from the film offices. 
Where is the talk of brave new worlds such as one hears 
emanating from the telecasters, the aircrafters, the auto- 
crafters. From a public relations standpoint, moviedom 
still has to learn the ABC's. It can not sell its tickets; it 
cannot sell investors; it cannot sell itself. The industry 
must cure the last-named weakness before it can hope to 
remedy the other two. 

O 

A glimpse of the current condition of industry shares, 
including both film companies and theatres, is offered be- 
low. Note the February descent in each category. 



Film BULLETIN Cinema Aggregate * 




FILM COMPANIES THEATRE COMPANIES 

^Composed of carefully selected representative industry issues. 



With bank credit tightening generally, it is time indus- 
try leaders pondered where the fresh money is to come 
from. There are only a limited number of sources : loans, 
stock investment and operational profits. Moviedom is in 
danger of being shut off from all three. The issue could 
grow critical. 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 7 



Samuel Goldwyn 



February 20, 1957 



Dear Barney: 



friends at 
office thi 



Last night I saw "FUNNY FACE" with a group of 
my house. I could hardly wait to get to my office this 
morning to tell you what a fresh, wonderful picture it is 
that reaches heights of entertainment seldom seen on the 
screen* 



It Is not often that I 
a picture, but this is 
Is, by all odds, one 
seen - on the stage 



have no reservations 
one of those times# 
of the finest musicals 
or on the screen* 



whatever about 
"FUNNY FACE" 
I have ever 



Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn are simply marvelous, as are 
Kay Thompson and all the members of the cast. In all the 
years I have known Fred I have never seen him dance better 
or give a more Inspired performance. Audrey Hepburn, who 
is always lovely, has never been more delightful, and Kay 
Thompson has opened up a new career for herself* 

The people at my house last night were a group of professionals 
American, British and French - but they broke into spontaneous 
applause after each wonderful number. I have never witnessed 
such enthusiasm and I am sure that the American public, and 
the public the world over, will love the picture equally* 

Everything about "FUNNY FACE" Is just brilliant. Not only 
the cast but the production, the direction, the choreography, 
the music, the photography, the color - the warmth, the 
gaiety, the fun, the beauty of the picture - are nothing 
short of extraordinary* Everyone who had anything to do 
with the picture deserves tremendous credit, for it proves 
that Hollywood is still capable of turning out the greatest 
entertainment in the world. This is a real new dimension 
In motion picture enjoyment* 

"FUNNY FACE" i* truly an inspired picture. It is going to 
mean a great deal to the motion picture industry because it 
is going to mean so much to the public. 

There is much more I could say about what a wonderful picture 
it is, but I can sum It all up by saying that | would be 

very proud to have had "FUNNY FACE" to my credit. 



S I ncere I y, 



Mr. Barney Balaban, President 
Paramount Pictures Corporation 
1501 Broadway 
New York 36, New York 




-et's All Get Back Of The 
Academy Sweepstakes! 



Hundreds of top theatres, including Radio City Music Hall, are booking it for Easter. 
And Paramount is backing it with hard-hitting promotion in all ticket-selling media 
— including national ads to 24 million movie-minded homes in Life, Look, McCall's 
and Redbook, with additional full pages in Seventeen and the entire fan list. 



EDITOR S NOTE 

In one stylish advertisement, created principally to move 
Cokes, the Coca-Cola people have provided a noteworthy 
example of institutionalizing the movie habit. 

The ad, which is reproduced in miniature on this page, 
prompted a trenchant essay by exhibitorphile Abram F. 
Myers, the Allied counsellor, whose quick reflex to a good 
thing rushed him into print in the bulletin reprinted below. 
Film BULLETIN welcomes Mr. Myers aboard its ancient and 
now-rolling PR bandwagon. Our editorial voice has grown 
hoarse enjoining the industry: "Sell the broad merits . . . 
sell the going . . . sell the habit." The cheese makers have 
learned to reduce Camenbert, Brie, Edam and the rest to a 
position subordinate to a larger appeal — that of creating a 
palate for the curd food as a whole. We have been institu- 
tionalized to believe in the delights of coffee and tea, of 
bananas and airplane travel. The organized citrus growers 
and some 10-score others in varied lines sell their "institu- 
tions" aside from their individual brands. 

We now turn you over to Mr. Myers and his suggestion 
that moviedom might find it politic to venture same? 



This bulletin is issued in appreciation of Coca-Cola's 
back cover ad in THIS WEEK MAGAZINE for March 
10. That publication is distributed as a supplement to cer- 
tain Sunday newspapers. If you missed it, look it up. It is 
a splendid example of good taste advertising for Coca-Cola 
and for the movies. It is hoped that the company will re- 
peat the ad in other periodicals with national circulation. 

In case THIS WEEK is not available in your communi- 
ty, here is a brief description of the ad. Three quarters of 
the page is consumed by a beautiful picture in colors. It 
looks through the foyer of a theatre to the screen. Except 
for the words "popcorn" and "Coca-Cola" on the boxes and 
cups held by the patrons, there is no lettering in the pic- 
ture. In the forground are a half-dozen smartly dressed, 
highly civilized people. 

These people are not juvenile delinquents, bobby-soxers, 
or rock'n roll addicts, dressed in leather jackets and over- 
alls, and bent on making other people unhappy. They are 
the kind of people decent-minded folks think they are or 
would like to be. Three of them comprise a family group 
of father, mother and young daughter. They are holding 
cokes and, in addition, the girl has a box of popcorn. A 
young man is moving toward the aisle with a box of pop- 
corn in each hand. 

A lot of cheap fun fun has been poked at the theatres for 
selling soft drinks, popcorn and other comestibles. People 
who munch their way through a circus, a ball game or a 
parade seem to think there is something ludicrous about 
eating popcorn in a theatre. But this ad shows people 
whose respectability and social correctness stand out all 



■ 



Coca-Cola's 
Example of 
Institutional 
Advertising 




Your own good taste selects the movie... 

the good taste of Coca-Cola adds to the enjoyment 



tut Jor fun. hair a Cokr . . . for Ihr special 
' txsl-lmrd sparkling drink in all tiu uorld. 



ION Ol (SOO 



over them enjoying the movies — cokes, popcorn and all. 
Emily Post could find no fault with them. 

The legend underneath the picture says: 

"Your own good taste selects the movie . . . the good 
taste of Coca-Cola adds to the enjoyment . . ." 

(Continued on Page 23) 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 9 



THEY 

MADE THE NEWS 



O'DONNELL 

ROBERT J. O'DONNELL confirmed 
that Interstate Theatres of Texas is enter- 
ing the field of theatre-to-home movie 
transmission. This was another instance 
of growing exhibitor interest in the sys- 
tem whereby films would be piped direct- 
ly from the theatre to the home via a 
closed circuit television cable, with sub- 
scribers to pay a fee on a period basis or 
per picture. O'Donnell, vice president and 
general manager of Interstate, said his 
company has called in engineers to make 
a careful check of the problems and fa- 
cilities required for point-to-point tele- 
vision, and that the company is seeking 
permission of the city council of Austin, 
Texas, to file application for permits to 
build transmitting facilities to serve more 
than 20 cities throughout the state. These 
moves were made at this time, according 
to O'Donnell, to meet the threat of com- 
petition from Capital Cable Corporation, 
which is proposing to set up a home-toll 
television system on a closed circuit. At 
the same time, Rowley United Theatres 
of Dallas has asked the Little Rock 
Arkansas, city council for a 25-year fran- 
chise on a theatre-to-home system in that 
city. Rowley attorney Linwood L. Brick- 
house told the council that the circuit has 
no immediate plans, but wants to keep 
any other company from taking over. A 
large-scale test of theatre-to-home trans- 
mission will be made during May in 
Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Video In- 
dependent Theatres, Inc. which owns all 
of the theatres in that town. Video presi- 
dent Henry Griffing, speaking recently at 
the 2nd annual United Theatres of Okla- 
homa convention, said "telemovies" — as 
he called them — were the "hope for the 
future of the motion picture business" and 
urged exhibitors to take advantage of 
them. He said "telemovies" are the best 
weapon against Toll-TV and that they 
will create a demand for more pictures. 
The Senate Commerce Committee was 
scheduled to take up the proposed experi- 
mental licensing of Toll-TV in selected 
areas. FCC chairman George C. McCon- 
naughey told the committee the commis- 
sion hoped to reach a decision on sub- 
scription TV in the near future. 



ERNEST G. STELLINGS, TOA presi- 
dent, called upon the industry to raise 
$2,800,000 as a fund for a business pro- 
motion program. The proposal, contained 
in a report to the TOA board meeting in 
Chicago recently, provided for a levy of 
4/10ths of one percent on all film rentals, 
figured to yield $1,400,000, with a like 
amount to be contributed by the film 
companies. The promotional campaign, 
Stellings suggested, would be handled 
through COMPO. The TOA directors 
endorsed the plan and authorized Stellings 
to implement it. Other board actions: (1) 
recommended to the Justice Department 
that it grant appropriate amendments to 
the consent decree to allow divorced cir- 
cuits to engage in film production with 
pre-emptive rights; (2) urged exhibitors 
and other interested groups to support 
Rep. Emanuel Celler's bill to outlaw sub- 
scription TV; (3) supported a petition 
calling for revision of the Small Business 
Administration's rules to permit the grant- 
ing of regular mortgage loans to exhibi- 
tors or for the creation by the Senate of 
a new board with such authority. The 
TOA board said it "viewed with con- 
tinued alarm the acute shortage of play- 
able product on the market". 

O 

CHARLES J. FELDMAN, Universal- 
International vice president and distribu- 
tion chief, raised exhibitor hopes for a 
more prosperous mid-year season with 
the announcement that his company will 
release 19 features between May and Oc- 
tober. Feldman said this represents the 
largest number of top pictures to be re- 
leased in a six-month period in the com- 
pany's history. A minimum of three will 
be issue each month. Six of the 19 will be 
RKO films, including the long-awaited 
"Jet Pilot", made in 1949 by Howard 
Hughes. It will be released in July. 
Among the other scheduled U-I films: 
May — "The Young Stranger", "Beast of 
the Kremlin", "The Deadly Mantis"; 
June— "Man Afraid", "The Kettles on Old 
MacDonald's Farm", "Public Pigeon No. 
1". Elsewhere on the U-I front, president 
Milton R. Rackmil told the stockholders 
annual meeting last week that profits for 
the three months ending Jan. 31, first 
quarter of the fiscal year, were consider- 
ably below those of a year ago. This 
drop, Rackmil explained was due to the 
fact that the company released no pic- 
tures in November and December, and 
that it expects to make up the loss in the 
second three-month period. He informed 
the stockholders that Universal is "in- 
vestigating the possibilities" of leasing its 
pre-1948 film library, but would never sell 
its library outright. 



JOHNSTON 

ERIC JOHNSTON set April 8 as the 
date for an initial meeting between ex- 
hibition and distribution leaders to discuss 
an all-industry arbitration program. TOA 
president Ernest G. Stellings and National 
Allied president Julius M. Gordon will 
meet with Johnston and the MPAA steer- 
ing committee on arbitration consisting of 
Columbia's Abe Montague, MGM's 
Charles M. Reagan, and Paramount's 
George Weltner. The first conference will 
be concerned with where and how to 
begin talks on establishing the arbitration 
system, what representation should be in- 
cluded at the drafting sessions, etc. John- 
ston said the meeting was arranged as a 
result of letters sent to company presi- 
dents Jan. 30 by National Allied request- 
ing discussions on the controversial sub- 
ject of arbitration. 

0 

FRANK KASSLER, president of Conti- 
nental Distributing Corp., revealed that 
the company has expended $1 million for 
six foreign pictures which it will distri- 
bute in this country. The money was 
made available through the so-called 
"Continental Plan" whereby exhibitors 
and exhibitor groups participate financial- 
ly in the distribution company. Conti- 
nental is a subsidiary of Walter Reade 
Theatres. The six pictures, all completed, 
will be released at eight-week intervals 
beginning in April or May, with physical 
distribution handled by National Film 
Service. Three are in French with sub- 
titles, the other three in English dialogue. 
Kassler said that arrangements with the 
producers of the pictures "precludes the 
possibility of any film being released to 
television in competition to exhibitors". 

0 

HARRY COHN, Columbia Pictures 
president, reported a $277,000 drop in the 
company's earnings for the 26-weeks end- 
ing Dec. 29, 1956 as compared to the same 
period in 1955. Net profit was $1,329,000, 
equal to $1.11 per share, compared with 
a net of $1,606,000 — $1.36 per share— the 
previous year. Comparative gross in- 
comes: $2,359,000 this year; $2,859,000 
the prior year. 



Page 10 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



THEY 




MADE THE NEWS 




Universal soles chief Charles J. Feldman dis- 
cusses promotional plans for "Battle Hymn" 
and " W ritten on the U in 'd" with Rock Hud- 
son, who stars in both films. 



STEVE BROIDY, Allied Artists presi- 
dent, declared that "the time has come to 
straighten out some misconceptions con- 
cerning 'Friendly Persuasion' " and pro- 
ceeded to do just that in a wire he sent 
to AA division managers. "In the first 
place, 'Friendly Persuasion' will be a 
commercial success," he said. "Up to 
date figures indicate that its net domestic 
gross, including Canada, will be in the 
neighborhood of $5,000,000 . . . Aside from 
its commercial success, every exhibitor in 
the nation will testify to the fact that this 
picture has done a greater public relations 
job for the entire industry than any film 
they have exhibited in years." The ex- 
ecutive concluded that in "Friendly Per- 
suasion" Allied Artists has "a picture 
which will live forever and continue to 
draw outstanding returns for exhibitors 
everywhere". 




Michael Todd. Jr.. I., signs for the Boston 
showing of Todd's ■■Around The World In 80 
Days" with Saxon theatre owner Benjamin 
Sack, eenter, while United Artists v.p. William 
Heineman looks on. L A is distributing the 
Todd-AO picture, receipient of eight Academy 
Award nominations. 



BUSINESS-BUILDING for the movie 
industry is beginning to take on organized 
form. The Joint Business-Building Com- 
mittee last week took the first step to- 
ward bringing to fruition a long-range 
all-industry promotional program de- 
signed to increase theatre attendance by 
ratifying the merger of the various plans 
originating with COMPO, TOA and the 
MPAA. Ernest G. Stellings, president of 
TOA, told the B-B Committee that he 
had definite pledges from theatres in his 
organization that they would pay their 
share of the proposed $2,800,000 industry- 
wide fund, half of which is to come from 
theatres and half from the distributors. 
The basic aim of the program, it was 
emphasized, will be "increase of attend- 
ance at motion picture theatres". Eleven 
initial projects were approved, including 
the Academy Award Sweepstakes (now 
in operation), Audience Awards, person- 
ality tours, an institutional radio program. 
Robert W. Coyne, Sam Pinanski and Abe 
Montague, the COMPO triumvirate, were 
authorized to appoint a five-man operating 
committee to carry out projects already 
approved, plan and manage future ones. 

0 

DARRYL F. ZANUCK, who suddenly 
resigned from the board of 20th Century- 
Fox within a few weeks after his election, 
emphatically denied that he did so be- 
cause of any tie-up with Howard Hughes. 
Hughes reputedly ranks second to Zanuck 
as holder of the largest number of the 
company's shares. The former production 
head for Fox and now producing inde- 
pendently for that company, said he re- 
signed "with great regret", pointing out 
it would be impossible for him to devote 
the necessary time and effort to duties as 
a company director. He said he was more 
than satisfied with present management. 
O 

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE has 
given a ray of hope to stars and other in- 
dustry talent whose independent com- 
panies were threatened with liquidation 
through the recent tax ruling against per- 
sonal service contract corporations. The 
IRS announced it had modified somewhat 
an earlier ruling taxing as personal in- 
come rather than capital gains the profits 
made by such "personal corporations". 
On the personal income basis the tax 
could range as high as 85%. Under its 
new ruling, the IRS said that where the 
corporation requires the services of per- 
sons other than the star, only that portion 
of the profits attributable to the largest 
stockholder — the star — would be subject 
to personal income tax. Though this pre- 
sents some ticklish problems, the IRS 
said it could be of benefit where the star 
could in some way make the profits attri- 
butable to his services less than the 
amounts actually retained. The IRS 
would decide what portion to tax. 

0 

ABC-TV has purchased 26 pictures from 
RKO Teleradio which it plans to tele- 
cast coast-to-coast from 7:30 to 10 pm. 
Sunday evenings. This will be the first 
move to offer American-made feature 
films on a national network. 



HEADLINERS... 



"Around the World" producer MICHAEL 
TODD honored March 19 by New York's 
Cinema Lodge of B'nai B'rith for contri- 
butions to humanitarian causes and 
furtherance of the interfaith movement . . . 
M. SPENCER LEVE, Southern Califor- 
nia division mgr. for Fox West Coast 
Theatres, named vice president of Fox 
West Coast Agency Corp., holding com- 
pany for Fox West Coast Theatres . . . 
Universal Eastern advertising director 
CHARLES SIMONELLI elected chair- 
man of the board of Thompson-Starrett 
Co., international engineering and con- 
struction company ... OTTO EBERT 
appoitned district manager of Detroit, 
Cleveland, Cincinnati and Indianapolis for 
Rank Film Distributors of America . . . 
JACK CHINELL, formerly Buffalo 
branch manager for RKO, appointed to 
represent Buena Vista in that area . . . 
DAVID C. SILVERMAN named Pitts- 
burgh branch manager for Allied Artists. 




Fox pres. Spyros P. Skouras, r., receives Award 
from "Seventeen" publisher Mrs. Enid A. Haupt 
honoring "The King and I", while composer 
Richard Rodgers observes. 

Formerly associated with RKO, he suc- 
ceeds ABE WEINER, now with J. 
Arthur Rank . . . Buena Vista presi- 
dent LEO F. SAMUELS tripped to New 
York, Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., 
recently with assistant Eastern division 
mgr. LEO GREENFIELD on distribu- 




The incandescont Anna Magnani squeezes Joseph 
Hazen Hal Wallis Productions executive, on her re- 
turn to U.S. to make "Obsession" for producer 
Wallis, with Paramount releasing. 

tion plans for current and upcoming re- 
leases ... GEORGE WELTNER, presi- 
dent of Paramount Film Distributing 
Corp., returns March 29 from extensive 
Latin American business tour . . . Rank 
advertising director GEOFFREY G. 
MARTIN returned March 17 from a week 
of conferences in London . . . 20th-Fox 
Philadelphia branch mgr. SAM DIA- 
MOND and Phila. exhibitor JACK 
GREENBERG to co-chairmen testimoni- 
al dinner for Loew's newly named LOU 
FORMATO, Southern division mgr. 
Dinner to be given by Motion Picture As- 
sociates April 8 . . . Cook County, Illinois, 
proud of its $20,159 raised through lobby 
collections for 1957 March of Dimes. 
JACK KIRSCH, Allied of Illinois presi- 
dent, chairmanned drive . . . 20th-Fox 
president SPYROS P. SKOURAS kicked 
off New York City's 1957 Red Cross 
Drive at a luncheon March 5 attended by, 
among others, Red Cross president Gen- 
eral ALFRED M. GRUENTHER . . . 
DAVE CANTOR resigned as exploita- 
tion manager for RKO Radio . . . 20th-Fox 
sales head ALEX HARRISON named to 
succeed RICHARD W. ALTSCHULER 
as chairman of the national distribution 
committee of the MPA . . . MRS. VIVI- 
ENNE NEARING, of the Warner 
Brothers home office legal department, a 
national celebrity since beating out 
Charles Van Doren on TV's "21". 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 11 



PATTERNS DF PATRONAGE 

v 



Cxdu^e $L BULLETIN 3*bm 



The Young Marrieds 



By LEONARD SPINRAD 

As customers, the young married population of America 
arc prime targets for every business. They are creating 
new families, building new houses, buying clothes, going 
in for do-it-yourself tools and supplies. They are the peo- 
ple who form the most prolific bloc of our population. It is 
no accident that they still dominate the motion picture 
audience. They always will, on a basis of sheer mathe- 
matics. 

The Bureau of the Census reports that in April, 1955, 
there were approximately 26,413,000 married people be- 
tween the ages of 14 and 34 alone in the United States. Of 
these, 1,096,000 husbands or wives were still in their teens. 
In the 35 to 44-year-old bracket, which marks the end of 
the young marrieds and the beginning of the next buying 
group, there were an additional 19,720,000 wedded men 
and women. 

These statistics loom even larger when they are con- 
sidered in historical perspective. Between 1950 and 1955, 
the percentage of married people among the teen aged 
population remained fairiy constant. In the 20-24 age 
group, the percentage of married men rose from 41% to 
51.2%, while the female proportion increased from 67.7% 
to 70.9%. Between the ages of 25 and 34 the male propor- 
tion of married men to total population in that age level 
declined while the female rose slightly. In the older brack- 
ets the changes were of little import. 



THEY MARRY EARLIER 



The biggest increase in the marriage rate, among 20-24- 
year-old men, accompanied by a decline in the next male 
age group, indicates that men are marrying earlier than 
they used to. The increase in married females at the same 
level, though smaller than the male change, also shows 
more marriages in the 20-24 bracket. 

Our young married population is not only more numer- 
ous but also younger than it used to be. In 1930 the median 
age at first marriage in the United States was 24.3 for 
males and 21.3 for females. In 1940 it was practically un- 
changed. But in 1954 it was down to 23.0 for males and 




20.3 for females, and one year later the Census people esti 
mated that it grown even younger, to 22.7 years of age for 
the men and 20.2 years of age for the women. 

The median American bride today is barely out of her 
teens, too young to vote and not likely to be fully mature 
in her tastes and opinions. Her husband is just about two 
and a half years older. If he went to college, he has just 
graduated and is embarked on his first job. 

Add a few years to this couple. Project them into the 
happily married status with an infant or two, a house of 
their own or a bigger apartment in view — and they are 
still in their mid-twenties. 



There is one thing which every married couple can at- 
test. The young bride and groom, no matter what finan- 
cial challenges beset them, have no real problems until the 
children come along. They go out when and where they 
want to, within their budget. They do without one thing 
to have another. But when the children arrive things are 
different. Apart from being tied dow:: much more than 
before, and having less of what the economists call dis- 
cretionary spending power (since, with so many more ab- 
solute necessities to buy, there are apt to be less luxuries), 
their daily world is different. 

The wife is much more tired at the end of a day home 
with the children than when she worked in an office or just 
took things easy while hubby was earning his paycheck. 



Pag* 12 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



THE YDUNG MARRIEDS 



11 hut Kind of Movies 1P<> They Prefer? 



The husband in most cases tries to assist her with some of 
the chores while he is home, and is apt to be more tired 
himself thereafter. 

All these observations have a direct bearing upon the 
motion picture audience. Every survey indicates that the 
backbone of this audience is and must be the age level of 
the population which is primarily concerned with mar- 
riage. The teen agers are a highly important audience 
group, of course, but the 20-35-year-old age level dominates 
moviegoing, as it does practically every other form of 
American consumer purchasing. And don't forget that the 
teen agers and the young marrieds have a degree of over- 
lap. This overlap has a dual characteristic. 

It is possible that, because of the earlier marrying age, 
our teen-agers are becoming more sophisticated. This has 
been suggested by many not entirely approving critics of 
the folkways and mores of 16-year-olds. It is equally pos- 
sible, however, that our young marrieds are becoming less 
sophisticated — if only because they are becoming younger. 

Translate these thought into terms of the motion picture 
theatre. The top grossing pictures of last year — not in- 
cluding late releases like "Giant" or "The Ten Command- 
ments," neither of which vitiates the point — were all pic- 
tures with a simple appeal, like "Guys and Dolls," "The 
King and I," "Trapeze," "High Society" and "I'll Cry To- 
morrow." "War and Peace" and "Moby Dick" were as 
highly praised, to say the least, as some of the others, and 
were by no means unsuccessful; but they had harder going 
because they dealt with subjects which had an aura of 
sophisticated intellectualism. 

What young married people want in motion pictures 
varies with the people. But it is safe to say that young 
brides and grooms are not interested for the most part in 
crusading messages or intellectual masterpieces. They 
want to laugh, they want to gasp and they want to cry a 
little, holding each other's hand for pleasant comfort while 
they do so. 

For this, until the babies come, all the statistics seem to 
indicate that the movies are their first choice away from 
home. But things change when the diaper service starts. 
(No joke intended.) And it is here that the crucial element 
of the motion picture theatre's relationship with the young 
married audience comes into view. 

Up to this point, the motion picture itself has been the 
main concern of the ticket purchaser. A newlywed couple 
won't go into a theatre that is kept like a stable, any more 
than other patrons will. But the young man and wife are 
not terribly interested in going to the theatre that has the 
nicest looking lobby either. As long as the physical fa- 
cilities are adequate, they don't make a tremendous dif- 
ference. The time schedule isn't very important, or the 
length of the show. 




But when Mr. and Mrs. add a couple of juniors, things 
are different. Whether they are taking the kids or leaving 
them home with a baby sitter, the programming schedule 
is important to them. Many a young father and/or mother 
has stopped going to the movies with any regularity be- 
cause he or she wanted to come in at the beginning of the 
pictures and found this impossible in terms of the baby 
feeding, bathing or family dining schedule at home. In in- 
stances where the program starts at a convenient time, it 
has sometimes been just too long a show. Practically every 
New York City theatregoer, for example, has wondered 
out loud at some time or another why double bills plus 
short subjects have to be so long. 

When the children grow old enough to go to the movies 
with their parents — who may still be well within the young 
married category — the condition of the theatre becomes 
important. Children do nothing to improve the physical 
calibre of the showhouse they attend; but the anomaly is 
that careful parents don't like to take their children to 
run-down theatres if they can help it. This particularly 
applies in big cities where there are alternative kinds of 
entertainment, including a plethora of television channels. 



MORE MALE PATRONS THAN FEMALE 



The drive-in theatre's success has certainly been due in 
tremendous measure to the way it filled the entertainment 
needs of the young marrieds. It gave them a greater de- 
gree of privacy; it made family moviegoing easier than it 
had ever been before; and, by no means the least of its ap- 
peals, it kept the young children where papa and mama 
had less trouble controlling them (no running up and 
down the aisles, no angry man staring at papa because 
junior's lolly pop has been slurped so near his ear.) 

We are still a few years away from an extremely impor- 
tant development among the young marrieds. If people 
get married younger they are likely to become parents 
younger. This means that a woman who marries at 20.2 
years — the median age in 1955 — and has a family of three 
children in the next five years, will be the parents of three 
independently moviegoing teenagers at age 38. If she has 
two children, she may be similarly situated, free of the 

(Continued on Page 22) 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 13 



"Gold of Naples" 
Gcuuteu, Rati*? GOO 

Intense, emotional Italian satire (English titles). Superb per- 
formances. First-rate art fare, good for class houses. 

This is an unusually well produced and directed satire 
from Italy, with English titles, in the form of four short 
stories. Full of spirit and compassion, and told with pace, 
this Ponti-De Laurentiis Production for DCA release, has 
a bright b.o. potential in art houses. Dynamic director 
Vittorio De Sica is responsible for modern cinema classics 
such as "Bicycle Thief" and "Miracle in Milan". The 
first rank Italian cast is headed by Toto, a Chaplinesque 
clown, the voluptuous Sophia Loren, and Silvana ("Bitter 
Rice") Mangano. In "The Racketeer" Toto is victimized 
by a truculent bully who has lived in his home for ten 
years. When it is believed the huge man has a weak heart, 
Toto screws up enough courage to throw him out. "Pizza 
on Credit" deals with Sophia Loren, wife of a pizza baker 
who tells her husband her emerald ring fell in the dough, 
rather than admit she left it at her lover's house. This 
sends the husband scurring to run down the day's cus- 
tomers. De Sica plays "The Gambler", a penniless count 
reduced to playing cards for imaginary stakes with the 
porter's small son. The child always wins and the enraged 
count insists it's "pure luck" not skill. "Theresa", Miss 
Mangano, is a prostitute who married a man she doesn't 
meet until just before the wedding. The husband will not 
share her bed. She is shocked to learn that he married her 
to clear his conscience from guilt he feels because a young 
girl committed suicide because of him. 

DCA. I A Ponti-De Laurentiis Production). 107 minutes. Toto, Sophia Loren, 
Vittorio De Sica, Silvana Mangano. Produced by Dino De Laurentiis and Carlo 
Ponti. Directed by Vittorio De Sica. 

"Tarzan and the Lost Safari" 

Standard adventure fare for Tarzan fans. Programmer gen- 
erally. Good Technicolor shots of Africa, animals. 

This latest adventure of Edgar Rice Burroughs' famed 
jungle character, made for MGM by Sol Lesser, is typical 
of its genre, neither more nor less interesting than its 
predecessors and in fact resembling them in most aspects. 
The amorphous "Tarzan" fans should find it worth seeing, 
however, and with adequate exploitation picture shapes 
up as an OK entry for action and bally houses. Some good 
Technicolor photography of the African terrain with its 
array of bizarre animals gives "Safari" its main distinction. 
Otherwise it is replete with the intrigues, animal fights and 
last-minute rescues which characterize most of the series. 
Bruce Humberstone's direction is competent and he keeps 
the action uncluttered and moving along at a good clip. 
Gordon Scott makes a muscular Tarzan. The supporting 
cast is not distinctive. Tarzan (Scott) rescues five white 
persons after their small plane crashes in the jungle. With 
the help of ivory hunter Robert Beatty he leads them al- 
most to safety through hostile native territory. They are 
betrayed by Beatty, who seeks to ingratiate himself with 
the natives, and taken to the native village as sacrifices. 
Tarzan, who had escaped, sets fire to the village and res- 
cues them. Beatty is killed by the enraged natives. 

MGM. 80 minutes. Gordon Scott, Robert Beatty. Betta St. John. Produced by 
Sol Lesser. Directed by Bruce Humberstone. 



"The Vintage" 
Sc«tfHe4d 1£aU*$ O O Plus 

Love drama keyed to class, fern audiences. Fair name 
values. Will require heavy selling in general market. 

A love story, beautifully photographed in southern 
France, this CinemaScope-Metrocolor production via 
M-G-M offers elements that should satisfy the class audi- 
ence, with special appeal to the women. Its boxoffice per- s 
formance in the general market, however, will depend a 
great deal on the exploitation effort expended. Perform- 
ances by the principals, Mel Ferrer, Pier Angeii, John 
Kerr and Michele Morgan are all competent, Miss Morgan 
being especially vibrant. Although Edwin H. Knoph's di- 
rection is creditable, "The Vintage," at times, moves too 
slowly, but packs enough dramatic impact to carry it over 
its weak spots. Title of the Jeffrey Hayden production 
figures to be a weak promotional handle. Brothers Ferrer 
and Kerr slip over the Italian border into the grape-grow- 
ing region of southern France to evade the police, who are 
searching for Kerr, wanted for murder. Arriving in the 
midst of the harvest season, they wangle jobs from Leif 
Erickson, owner of a small vineyard. Kerr falls in love 
with Michele Morgan, Erickson's wife, while Ferrer takes 
to Pier Angeii, young unmarried sister of Miss Morgan. 
When the gendarmes close in on Kerr, Miss Morgan at- 
tempts to save him. Trying to escape, Kerr is killed. 
Ferrer starts a new life with Miss Angeii. 

M-G-M. 90 minutes. Mel Ferrer, Pier Angeii, John Kerr, Michele Morgan. Pro- 
duced by Jeftrey Hayden. Directed by Edwin H. Knoph. 

"The Delinquents" 

Minor programmer best suited to bally, action houses. Will 
need lots of exploitation. 

This United Artists release is an exploitable program- 
mer, best suited for sub-run action and bally houses, and 
needing lots of exploitation. Produced on a very low bud- 
get, it purports to expose the ruthlessness of teenage de- 
linquents, while making a plea for their compassion and 
guidance. Robert Altman, who wrote the screenplay and 
directed, has used location shots throughout and a cast 
composed mostly of non-professionals. Result, while au- i 
thenticity lends realism, the overall effect is not impres- 
sive. Black and white camera work, lighting and sound 
are all sub-par, and poor editing results in some confusion 
at dramatic moments. Despite all the drawbacks, perform- 
ances are convincing. When teenager Tommy Laughlin is I 
told by parents of Rosemary Howard that they must stop J 
going steady, he gets mixed up with a hoodlum gang. 
Leader Peter Miller suggests he pose as date of Miss Ho- 
ward, so she and Laughlin can get together. After a wild 
party at an abandoned house, the police raid the place 
after Laughlin and Miss Howard have left. The gang ac- 
cuses Laughlin of squealing, and frame him for a gas sta- 
tion holdup. To keep him from telling police, they trick 
Miss Howard into becoming their prisoner. Laughlin goes 
to hideout, beats up Miller but not before he is knifed. All 
are rounded up by the police. 

UA (Imperial Productions, Inc). 75 minutes. Tommy Laughlin, Peter Miller, Rose- 
mary Howard. Written, produced, directed by Robert Altman. 



Page 14 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



"Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison" 

SccAuteu "Rati*? GOO Plus 

Deeply engrossing story. Expert direction, fine perform- 
ances. Ample action, suspense. Should do well in every 
situation. Strong marquee in Deborah Kerr, Mitchum. 

Audiences of every age and description should take 
warmly to this unusual picture. In the capable hands of di- 
rector John Huston ("African Queen"), the adaptation of 
j Charles Shaw's novel about a nun and a marine who dodge 
the Japanese on a lonely Pacific island and experience 
tender feelings for each other is a wonderfully moving, 
deeply engrossing story. Deborah Kerr and Robert Mitch- 
um provide potent marquee power, and with the proper ex- 
ploitation of the film's action and suspense, it can't miss 
being a boxoffice bonanza in almost every situation. Pro- 
duced for 20th-Fox by Buddy Adler and Eugene Frenke 
in CinemaScope and DeLuxe color, "Mr. Allison" is en- 
hanced by the lushly beautiful South Pacific setting. Di- 
rector Huston, who wrote the excellent screenplay in col- 
laboration with John Lee Mahin, has again employed his 
firm grasp of cinema craftsmenship to produce a film that 
is both tender and exciting, warmly human and suspense- 
ful. Mitchum and Miss Kerr are in top form. Mitchum, a 
marine, and Miss Kerr, a nun, are marooned on the same 
island during the Pacific war. The Japanese take over and 
they hide in a cave. When their food runs out, Mitchum 
steals some from under the noses of the Japanese. The in- 
vaders leave and Mitchum celebrates by getting drunk, 
confessing his love for Miss Kerr. She runs away in fright 
in the teeming rain. He finds her the next day ill and 
feverish just as the Japanese return. To save her he steals 
medicine, killing a Japanese sentry. The Japs find the 
sentry and start a search of the island, but the U.S. Navy 
comes to the rescue, beginning its bombardment of the 
island, and in deactivating the Jap guns, Mitchum is 
wounded. Both he and Miss Kerr are eventually saved. 

20th Century-Fox. 93 minutes. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Produced by Buddy 
Adler and Eugene Frenke. Directed by John Huston. 

"Fury at Showdown" 
SuAuteu RattH? O Plus 

Program Western. Stock action, characters. John Derek for 
marquee. Will need exploitation. 

This is a below average Western with a small cast, little 
action and little in the way of marquee value. A Bob Gold- 
stein Production for United Artists release, "Fury at 
Showdown" is strictly for sub-run action houses. John 
Derek lends a modicum of prestige to the marquee and the 
title is OK. Otherwise, it offers little that is saleable. Per- 
formances are undistinguished. Though story line is un- 
cluttered, as in "High Noon", picture lacks vividness of 
characterization and feeling to hold interest. The John 
Beck production is in black and white. Derek, released 
from his one-year jail sentence for a killing, returns to his 
brother (Nick Adams) and their ranch near the town of 
Showdown. In his attempts to go straight, Derek is ham- 
strung by Gage Clarke, brother of the man he killed, who 
is out for revenge. When Adams is killed by Clarke's hired 
killer, Derek shoots the killer, Clarke is captured. Derek 
proves he's going straight, wins girl, Carolyn Craig. 

United Artists (Bob Goldstein Prods. I. 75 minutes. John Derek Carolyn Craig. 
Nick Adams. Produced by John Beck. Directed by Gerd Oswald. 



"Tears for Simon" 

Scuitete Rate*? O O 

British import about search for stolen American child is grip- 
ping. Lacks names. Will need exploitation. 

Republic has undertaken the U.S. release of an excep- 
tionally engrossing "search" drama that should have gen- 
eral appeal. But being British, and with its lack of names, 
it will take exploitation. The J. Arthur Rank production 
by Vivian Cox has a ring of authenticity as it traces the 
efforts of London police in locating a stolen American 
child. London locations in Eastman Color are admirably 
employed. An excellent script by Janet Green, and Hitch- 
cock-like techniques by director Guy Green, lift picture 
above the general run of cinema mysteries. "Tears for 
Simon", however, does have the added disadvantage of a 
poor title. This could be overcome with proper exploita- 
tion emphasizing the kidnapping, with parents providing 
a potential market. Simon, 19-months-old, is stolen from 
David Knight and Julia Arnell, American couple living in 
London. Detective David Farrar follows up every clue, 
but they fear the child is dead. On the verge of nervous 
breakdown, Miss Arnell complies with demands for money 
from small-time crooks who do not have the child. They 
are caught by police. Clue leads Farrar to a deranged 
woman living at a sea-side resort. Woman threatens to 
jump over a cliff with Simon, but is caught by Farrar. 

Republic. (J. Arthur Rank). 91 minutes. David Farrar. David Knight, Julia Ar- 
nail. Produced by Vivian A. Cox. Directed by Guy Green. 

"Spring Reunion" 

Sci4uie44 RcUitt? O O 

Sub-par romantic drama. Marquee value of Hutton, Dana 
Andrews provide mild boxoffice power. 

This Bryna Production for United Artists release, fea- 
tures Betty Hutton in a straight dramatic role. It will dis- 
appoint her fans. While her performance comes across sin- 
cerely, and at times forcefully, "Spring Reunion" is a tepid, 
diffuse soap opera weighted with too many cliches. The 
exhibitor will have to rely on the marquee strength of Miss 
Hutton and Dana Andrews, but word-of-mouth will not 
help. Strongest appeal will be to the fern trade. Script by 
director Robert Pirosh and Elick Moll follows a too- 
familiar story line. Pirosh's direction tends toward the 
melodramatic, is uneven and allows for no real empathy 
between characters and audience. The Jerry Bresler pro- 
duction is in black and white. Betty Hutton, voted most 
popular in her 1941 high school class, is helping arrange its 
15th reunion. She runs into old schoolmate Dana Andrews, 
voted most likely to succeed. Neither has fulfilled promise. 
Both unmarried, she is a successful businesswoman in her 
father's real estate enterprise, he has drifted from job to 
job. They go for a midnight sail and are beached against 
a lighthouse where the old keeper, James Gleason, makes 
her see that Andrews isn't just the wolf she always as- 
sumed he was. With understanding comes love and they 
decide to marry. However, father Robert Simon, not want- 
ing to lose her, tries to ruin match, but mother Laura 
LaPlante convinces her that marriage is best. 

A Bryna Production (United Artists). 7? minutes. Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews, 
Jean Hagen, James Gleason, Laura LaPlante. Produced by Jerry Bresler. Directed 
by Robert Pirosh. 



Film BULLETIN March 18. 1957 Page 15 



Viewpoints 

i Continued from Page 3) 

trends originate, is in a ferment over 
systems of transmitting motion pic- 
tures right into homes on a wired 
hook-up, using none of the airwaves, 
requiring no television channels and 
thus by-passing all the legal re- 
straints which might otherwise be 
imposed. The forthcoming experi- 
ment by the Video Independent 
Theatres circuit in Bartlesville, 
Okla., has already triggered a chain 
reaction among exhibitors interested 
in this new "telemovie" concept. 

The telephone company's research 
has progressed to the point where it 
is possible to transmit a television 
sight and sound signal — at least 
experimentally — over a regular tele- 
phone line. Some cities are already 
trying to draw up franchise tax reg- 
ulations covering this sort of closed 
circuit television programming. 

Nobody knows yet whether it will 
be a worthwhile operation for ex- 
hibitors. We'll have to wait to see 
whether, for example, it will bring 
new business for the movies cr 
merely drain off some of the receipts 
of the theatres. 

But what we must realize is that 
the day may soon come when this 
sort of wired subscription television 
operates regardless of theatres. It 
wasn't so long ago that every movie 
distributor was insisting he would 
simply not sell his backlog to tele- 
vision. The insistent laws of eco- 
nomics changed that. Not every 
distributor says the same thing 
today about wired home television; 
most still refuse to make any long 
range commitment, until they see 
how things work out. 

This presents an opportunity that 
the southwestern exhibitors have be- 
gun to exploit with characteristic 
alertness — and a lesson for the mo- 
tion picture business in general. 

We have a situation today in com- 
mercial television which we hope 
will not be repeated in other media. 
Motion pictures are the backbone of 
today's TV, but instead of benefiting 
the entire motion picture industry 
this has helped a few and hurt many. 
In most cases people outside the mo- 



tion picture business have been able 
to scavenge and build their own for- 
tunes from it. 

It would be wise for every exhibi- 
tor in every American community to 
look into the wired television pos- 
sibilities in his area. Perhaps a 
group of exhibitors in a larger city 
can take steps, at the risk of a 
modest payment, to obtain long- 
term franchises in their community 
with an eye toward future develop- 
ments. 

What happened with television 
channel licenses can happen again 
with wired TV franchises; those 
who get there first end up with the 
winnings. It costs money to estab- 
lish a position, but this money cer- 
tainly comes back once things start 
rolling. 

And it is important to remember 
that if wired subscription television 
turns out to be mechanically prac- 
tical and economically expedient, it 
may well come into being even with- 
out movies. The Brooklyn Dodgers 
have been outspoken in their desire 
to switch from regular TV to some 
toll system; big-time boxing bouts 
might well go the same way. 

There is, of course, a menace to 
the theatre in wired television, but 
there is also an unequaled opportuni- 
ty. The wise exhibitor will start in- 
vestigating without delay. 

Tribute 

Ta Siiouras 

A sample of exhibitor sentiment about 
Spyros P. Skouras. president of 20th Century- 
Fox, is contained in this excerpt from a recent 
issue of the bulletin put out by the Allied 
Independent Theatre Owners of Iowa. Nebras- 
ka. South Dakota and Mid-Central. 

We are happy to give our strong- 
est endorsement to the upcoming 
20th Century-Fox "Spyros P. Skou- 
ras 15th Anniversary Celebration" 
March 24 to May 4 as announced by 
Alex Harrison, in honor of Spyros' 
15-year leadership as President of 
the company (how the years do race 
by!). During this time he has been 
a real leader and power in the best 
interests of our industry, with the 
courage and vision to introduce 
CinemaScope and produce many of 
our finest productions, and the heart 
to be concerned about the exhibitors 



problems. We particularly endorse 
this drive and urge our fellow ex- 
hibitors to make it a huge success 
with contracts and playdates be- 
cause Mr. Skouras and 20th Cen- 
tury-Fox today stand almost alone 
in the top producer-distributor eche- 
lon who apparently give a damn 
whether the small exhibitor sur- 
vives. Without Spyros Skouras, the 
plight of the exhibitor would be 
well-nigh hopeless and the future, if 
any, dark indeed ! 




To The Editor ; 

Concerning your editorial entitled 
"This Is the Time For Exhibitor 
Unity" : I couldn't agree with you 
more. I believe it's been the time 
for many years now, and perhaps 
quite a few years past time. I do not 
agree with the thoughts expressed 
by some of the persons in this indus- 
try that two exhibitor organizations, 
or better than two, working together 
are better than one. I think that 
there is a very old adage, stated by 
one of the brilliant fathers of our 
country, which stated, "In unity 
there is strength; divided we fall". 
This is still appropriate and accu- 
rate today. 

Certainly, the interests of exhibi- 
tors are synonymous with the prob- 
lems of exhibitors. It is my opinion 
that only working shoulder to 
shoulder will the exhibitors stand a 
chance to help lead this industry to 
higher levels and a really bright and 
successful future. The people who 
were responsible for most all of the 
progress, most all of the showman- 
ship in our industry, past and pres- 
ent, accomplished it with the help of 
imagination and leadership. I posi- 
tively believe that there is enough 
leadership to coordinate and harness 
exhibition to a brighter future with 
unity. 

WALTER READE, JR. 

If alter Reade Theatres 



Page 16 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



/tie 'Doiayf 

MERCHANDISING & 
EXPLOITATION DEPARTMENT 



'Sweepstakes', Despite Late Start 
Showing Promotional Potential 



Considering the short time in which the 
campaign was put into operation, the 
I Academy Awards Sweepstakes drive can be 
considered a success. While it has hardly 
assumed the stature of a truly national pro- 
motion, the "Oscars" contest — undertaken, 
as it was, on short notice — is getting a 
thorough testing in a representative cross- 
section of the country. Almost 3,000 thea- 
tres are taking part and interest is gathering 
momentum as scores of newspapers through- 
out the nation have tied up with local thea- 
tres to ballyhoo the promotion. 

In a COMPO advertisement in Editor and 
Publisher magazine, the industry organiza- 
tion urges other newspapers to climb on the 
bandwagon of the "year's best promotion". 
The COMPO ad points out that "the Sweep- 
stakes idea appeals especially to their read- 
ers" and that "several are reprinting the 
entry blank; others are ballyhooing the con- 
test on their delivery trucks and even with 
front-page banners". 

Latest reports on the campaign: 

In the Seattle exchange area, forty thea- 
tres are going all-out to sell the Awards 
contest. Approximately $1,800 worth of mer- 
chandise has been promoted by the Ham- 
rick circuit for its Tacoma and Seattle thea- 

'Round-the-world Talent 
Hunt Set by 20th on 'Smile' 

An international talent hunt is being 
launched by 20th Century-Fox to find a 
young unknown to play the leading fern role 
in "A Certain Smile," best-selling novel by 
Francoise Sagon, young French novelist. In 
addition to the specific objective of filling 
this role, the round-the-world quest will seek 
candidates for 20th's new talent school, now 
in operation in Hollywood. 

Scheduled to be one of the company's big- 
gest productions, the film will be produced 
by Henry Ephron and the screen play will 
be written by Pulitzer Prize winners Francis 
and Albert Hackett. Studio chief Buddy 
Adler is of the opinion that the heroine role 
winner will skyrocket to stardom. 




tres. As an outstanding example of promo- 
tion, Joe Rosenfield, operator of a small 
Seattle theatre, has personally put up $500 in 
savings bonds as prizes for his patrons. 

Elsewhere, a wide range of prizes are being 
offered to contestants in the Sweepstakes 
competition. A Ford automobile has been 
promoted by the Toledo, Ohio, Managers 
Association as first prize in the contest there. 
Among the other give-aways: a 21-inch TV 
set, a combination radio-Hi-Fi and a portable 
Hi-Fi set. Deep in the heart of Texas, 
Brownsville exhibitors are offering round- 
trip airline tickets for two to Monterey, 
Mexico, as the first prize. San Antonio 
prizes include a Kelvinator Food-O-Rama 
refrigerator, three complete dance courses at 
the Arthur Murray studios and a 21-inch TV 
set. The San Antonio Express is running a 
ballot every day during the period of the 
contest. 

In Nashville, Tenn., with the cooperation 
of the city's big daily, The Tennessean, ex- 
hibitors are awarding an all-expense paid 
full-week trip-for-two to Hollywood. Sixteen 
Crescent Amusement Co. houses and drive- 
ins and five competing drive-ins have joined 
hands with the Southern newspaper to boom 
the drive. 

Schine Manager Boosts B.O. 
With "G. Washington' Kid Show 

There have been kiddie shows and kiddie 
shows, but John Corbett, manager of 
Schine's Rialto in Amsterdam, N. Y. need 
take a back seat to no one in staging them. 
His recent Washington's Birthday Kiddie 
Show promotion was really a lulu. ' 

As part of the advance campaign Corbett 
had a "cherry tree" standing in front of his 
theatre, and on the tree were hung large 
circles giving details of the coming show. 
An usher garbed like a Colonial Washington 
invited youngsters to take a whack at the 
tree with a small rubber hatchet. After try- 
ing their luck, the kids were asked to sign 
their name to a roster of lucky woodsmen 
who would get ducats to the holiday show. 



« Si Seedier, M-G-M ad 
manager (left) and Don 
Gillin, sales chief of Sol 
Lesser Productions, hold a 
conference on advertising 
for Lesser's "Tarzan and 
the Lost Safari". Sitting 
in on the meeting is 
"Zippy", reputedly the 
"technical adviser" on 
this latest Tarzan film, 
which Metro will release. 




Page II 



Wind-up of the beauty sweepstakes -d>- 
drumbeating Stanley Kramer's "The Pride and 
the Passion" was held at the Vanderbilt Hotel 
in New York City, with over $50,000 in loot 
going to finalists and semi-finalists. Top: As- 
pirants for the grand prize show their stuff to 
judges and spectators. Winner, Sharlayne Fer- 
raro of Portland, Oregon, received trip to Holly- 
wood, talent test and new auto. Bottom: UA 
director of special events, Lige Brian, kicks off 
the judging. Among the judges: Aldo Ray, 
Robert Ryan, syndicated columnist Earl Wilson. 

'Ten C Business-Binding 
'Bible' Prepared by Paramount 

A promotional "bible" to aid exhibitors in 
the handling of special engagements of "The 
Ten Commandments" has been prepared by 
Paramount. It contains a detailed outline of 
a wide variety of business-building ideas. 

Published in the form of a specially-bound 
50-page booklet, the manual is crowded with 
a comprehensive collection of tried-and- 
tested ideas and methods that have been em- 
ployed successfully in early engagements. 
Covering a wide range of promotional and 
merchandising ideas, the volume offers sug- 
gestions on such subjects as special screen- 
ings, gift ticket displays, reserved seating 
arrangements and theatre fronts. The easy- 
to-read and understand book is the collective 
work of various Paramount executives and 
specialists in marketing. 

Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 17 



# i% Touring Stars Sell ft ^ 



To exhibitors searching for more and better weapons with which to 
combat the inroads of TV and other recreational competition on thea- 
tre attendance, the business-building impact of personal appearances 
of stars, producers, directors and other personalities connected with 
movie-making is well known. They have long been crying for more 
in-the-flesh drumbeating by film names, a promotional asset of proven 
merit. Fact is, as witness examples below, that some stars are hitting 
the trail through towns and cities to stimulate interest in current re- 
leases. And boxoffice reports from places where they appear bear 
testimony to the public response to film personalities. Let's have more ! 




Ad Magazine's Advice: "Take 
A Tip From Movie Exhibitors" 

Movie exhibitors were given a nice pat-on- 
the-back recently with publication of an il- 
luminating feature article in Advertising Re- 
quirements, nationally circulated trade pub- 
lication for merchandising, advertising and 
marketing executives. Titled "Take a Tip 
From The Movies", the article touts the 
good theatre manager as a "master of strik- 
ing promotional techniques — at a low 
budget". 

Declaring that "dramatically effective 
point-of-sale display and outpost tie-in pro- 
motion are used routinely in the merchandis- 
ing of motion pictures", Advertising Re- 
quirements suggests to its readers that they 
would do well to emulate and adapt the 
showmanship of the exhibitor in advertising 
of their own products. Wilson Elliot, man- 
ager of the 1200-seat Jewel Theatre, Mt. 
Clemens, Mich., is profiled by the magazine 
as a theatreman with a reputation for red- 
hot promotional know-how. A step-by-step 
detailed description of Elliot's successful 
promotion on "Trapeze" is utilized as a case 
history of aggressive showmanship. 

Tunny Face' Sets Co-op With 
Seventeen and Dept. Stores 

In a slick drive aimed at the lucrative 
fem-teen market, a triple-tie-up has been set 
by Paramount on "Funny Face" with Seven- 
teen Magazine and seventy-seven leading de- 
partment stores throughout the nation. 
Tabbed "Think Pink", the promotion is 
based on a production number of the same 
name in the Technicolor musical starring 
Fred Astaire and Audrey Hepburn. 

Seventeen's March issue sets the theme for 
the giant co-op venture with several sections 
and the cover page devoted to "Think Pink" 
fashion themes. To serve as a fashion guide 
for the department stores participating in 
the three-way promotion, Seventeen has pre- 
pared a special brochure detailing steps for 
advertising, window displays, and many 
other business-stimulating activities, each of 
which is keyed to "Funny Face" and "Think 
Pink" fashions. 

Also featured in the March Seventeen is 
a two-page photos-and-text spread featuring 
Astaire and Miss Hepburn. Among the 
stores participating in the king-size cam- 
paign are Filene's of Boston, Gimbel's, Phil- 
adelphia, and Hudson's, Detroit. 

'80 Days' LP Exploitation 

Decca Records has launched its broadest 
exploitation campaign to date for the 12-inch, 
long-playing album sound track from 
"Around the World in Eighty Days". Full- 
page co-op ads will appear in each local area 
as the Mike Todd wide-screen spectacle hits 
town. The record concern already reports 
unprecedented sales of the album — due to 
the astonishing word-of-mouth on the Todd- 
AO feature. 



Typical of the go-out-and-sell-'em pro- 
motional safaris is Robert Wagner's on be- 
half of 20th-Fox's "The True Story of Jesse 
James". Left: Wagner gives the good word 
to national and fan magazine editors at a 
luncheon press interview in New York City. 

•W- Upper row, 1. to r.: Before kicking-off 
on their 7500-mile cross-country tour to bally 
United Artists' "Men In War", stars Aldo 
Ray and Robert Ryan look over the promo- 
tional plans held by Roger Lewis, national 
director of advertising, publicity and exploi- 
tation, while Alfred Tamarin, Lewis' assist- 
ant, looks on. 2) In Washington, D. C, the 
traveling stars serve hot java to youthful 
bargain hunters waiting for a store to open 
interviews. 2) Welcome to St. Louis. A 



Center: Drumbeating the western drama ii 
Northfield, Minn., site of Jesse's last holdup 
the young star takes to the saddle during 
gala celebration in honor of his arrival 
Right: Wagner is greeted by son of banke 
shot by James during his final "job". 

with one of those famous Washington Birth 
day sales. 3) Arriving in Denver, Ryan an< 
Ray are interviewed by Bill Sharp of sta 
tion KVOD the moment their plane lands 
The high-flying pair spent two days in thi 
Mile High City plugging the war dramai 
Bottom row, left to right: Stopping off ii 
Chicago, they are interviewed by Mart 
Crane, WLS. During the nationwide trek 
the two made more than sixty radio-TV 
cheering delegation of fans greet the pair a 
the airport. 




Page 18 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



In order that Walt Disney cartoons 
may still continue to play the important 
part that they have in our great industry, 

BUENA VISTA FILM DISTRIBUTION, INC 
and NATIONAL FILM SERVICE have 

igreed to jointly serve you— Mr. Exhibitor 
— as follows: 




Sales offices and salesmen who are 
currently selling this company's 
product, will now sell you the 
Walt Disney cartoons. 



NATIONAL FILM SERVICE 

through its 33 branch offices will: 



ACCEPT YOUR PLAYDATES 

(including spot bookings) 




.SERVICE PRINTS 




. . . COLLECT FILM RENTALS 




"SHRINKING MAN" SHOCKER FOR SHOWMANSHIP 




It isn't easy to grow a new plant in the well-worked 
soil of horror films, but to all intents and purposes, Uni- 
versal-International, cradle of the macabre movie, seems 
to have accomplished just that in its latest eerie entry, 
"The Incredible Shrinking Man". 

Whereas most of the weirdies— moneymakers all of varying degrees — have 
concentrated on gigantic monsters of fantastic shapes and characteristics, this 
Albert Zugsmith production takes just the opposite path. Its hero is an aver- 
age guy who is suddenly afflicted with a strange malady that causes him to 
shrink inexorably to a miniscule, making the ordinary everyday sights and 
sounds we scarcely deign to give a second glance loom as monstrous perils, 
every moment fraught with terror of sudden extinction. A pet cat becomes a 
huge snarling fury, a tarantula spider turns into a bone-chilling monster more 
than twice the size of the tiny human, water from a leaking boiler is trans- 
formed into a roaring, swollen flood. 

Thus the showman is given a special treat — an offbeat horror film lush with 
exploitables backed by an offbeat advertising campaign head and shoulders 
above the usual treatment accorded such product. The striking newspaper ads, 
turned out by Jeff Livingston's hucksters under the supervision of promotion 
chief David Lipton, arm the theatreman with powerful weapons to fire the 
ammunition inherent in the film's theme and presentation. Superb use of 
black and white space give the ads a tone intriguing far beyond the usual 
audience garnered by horror or science-fiction films. True, U-I has included 
ads with terror-laden scenes in the tradition of past successes in this field, but 
the essential theme is the simple, striking: "A Fascinating Adventure into the 
Unknown" against an expanse of black with the tiny figure of the shrinking 
man looming into prominence by contrast. In some cases, the teaser legend 
expresses the basic theme: "Every hour he gets smaller . . . smaller . . . 
smaller! Every moment the terror mounts!" This line runs through the flame 
of a huge burning match eight times the size of the fleeing, little man. Here 
truly is a series of ads to make the showman's mouth water, to intrigue the 
reader. 

Of special import, too, is the nation-wide billboard campaign that is socking 
across the title and teasing the bizarre qualities of the attraction along the 
highways. Since February 15, the striking day-glo 24-sheets have been leaving 
their impact in and around some 400 communities from coast to coast, build- 
ing up a tremendous want-to-see well in advance of release. 

Another key feature of the campaign is the Orson Welles-narrated trans- 
cription for radio spots. The legendary Welles voice, that once threw the 
nation into a panic with his Martian invasion broadcast, is lending its power 
to the selling aids for "The Incredible Shrinking Man". The disc is free — a 
natural wherever radio use is possible. 

Stunt ideas flow from the title and theme. Because these indicate a gradual 
process, there is widespread opportunity for a maintained exploitation in this 
direction, working in the progressive dimunition in a variety of ways. The 
teaser ads give the cue beginning with the full figure of the running victim; 
each day the man grows smaller in the original-size white outline until he is 
a virtual pinpoint. A live version of this could have a six-footer start out on 
a street bally, with each day a smaller person in the same clothes making the 
rounds, emblazoned with the title and legend: "Each hour he gets smaller . . . 
smaller . . . smaller . . ." 

For the lobby, the miniature idea can be strikingly capitalized with a doll 
house, arranged with the local department store or toy dealer, in advance of 
playdate with display card reading: "Could you live in this house? Scott 
Carey DID! See 'The Incredible Shrinking Man*." Another simple but effec- 
tive gimmick is the use of a height and weight scale in the lobby with a cap- 
tion asking, "What was your height and weight yesterday? Check again now 
— Scott Carey did and found he was 'The Incredible Shrinking Man'!" 

With a little imagination, a real attention grabbing display can be rigged up 
depicting the everyday items that played a major role in the Shrinking Man's 
survival. An ordinary sewing needle which he used as a lance to defend him- 
self against a tarantula; a match which becomes a huge torch against the on- 
slaught of a cat; a pencil which serves as a life-saving log in a cataclysmic 
flood. All of these can be illustrated with stills from the picture, coupled with 
a miniature three-dimension figure tied in with the props. 

Here is a tremendous challenge to the showman with a capacity for the un- 
usual. He is fortified with exploitation elements galore. All that is required 
is a choice of which he can put to best use — and the doing. 



17 




Every hour 
he gets 
smaller 

and 
smaller 



and every 
moment 
the terror 
mounts ! 



THE INCREDIBLE 



Shrinking MAN 



NEWSPAPER AD 

It was inevitable that when three e 
pert delineators of the bizarre we 
thrown together that a most unusul 
film would emerge. First, there is Urj 
versal-International, fountainhead 
the horror film; then, there is Richai 
Matheson, one of the foremost autho 
in the weird science-fiction field; an 
finally, there is director Jack Arnol 
whose "Creature From the Black \.\ 
goon" reincarnated the dreadful mo 
sters of the Frankenstein-Wolf M 
ilk. Together, they have concocted 
screen potion that boils with oppo 
tunities for eery excitement. It all b 
gins when Grant Williams and wii 
Randy Stuart are exposed to a radii 
active fog, and the former discove: 
that he is beginning to shrink. He b 
comes a national freak while docto: 
search desperately for an antitoxin th< 
will halt the reversal of William 
growing processes. As he grows smal 
er, normal objects become gigantic- 
and perilous. When he reaches a sia 
of two inches, he is forced to live in 
doll house for protection against cat! 
mice and other household norms 
turned-monsters. Attacked by the ca 
he escapes in a fall down the cella 
steps, is believed dead. Trapped b 
stairs with walls like granite cliffs, h 
resorts to primitive means to iive, kil 
ing a spider with a pin, fighting a floo 
from a water heater leak, stealing foo 
from a mouse trap. Escaping from th 
cellar, he finds himself under the stan 
where all mankind is dwarfed into in; 
finitesimal size. As he continues t 
shrink, he realizes that there is no zerc 
that he exists as a creature of God. 



Page 20 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



EXPLOITATION 
PICTURE 

of the issue 



SHRMnmMAN 




The amazing special effects wrought by director of photography, Ellis W. Carter, with Clifford Stine, Roswell A. 
Hoffman and Everett H. Broussard for trick photography and optical effects, have been caught excitingly in the 
stills. Above, Grant Williams less than an inch tall, flees the snarling monster of a cat that had once purred softly 
against his leg; the starving dwarf desperately attempts to spring a mouse trap that could whack him into eternity 
in his effort to retrieve the cheese. Among other goose-pimple scenes: the two-inch-tall man's battle with a deadly 
five-inch tarantula, using a pin as a lance; the shrinking man in various stages of diminution seeing the world grow 
huge around him as he is told the doctors can do nothing for him. 

Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 21 



THE YDUNG MARRIEDS 



Problem of Appealing to Both Sexes 



(Continued from Page 13) 

close moviegoing tie to her children, when she is 36 and 
still close to being a member of the young marrieds. 

Thus it becomes increasingly wise for the motion pic- 
ture industry to maintain the appeal of moviegoing for the 
young married before, during and after their status 
changes from newiyweds to family unit. And this is where 
an unknown statistic deserves consideration. 

We know that more men than women go to the movies. 
We do not as yet have a breakdown of age and marital 
categories. For example, it is believed that more teenaged 
girls than boys go to the movies. If this is the case, then 
the overall preponderance of male patronage must trace 
to the fact that among the young married age group par- 
ticularly, the females have cut down on their moviegoing. 

What causes this apparent cut-down? To a certain ex- 
tent, of course, it is due to the fact that many young wom- 
en will not go to the movies alone, while men will. It is 
also directly attributable, in the opinion of some film peo- 
ple, to the decline of the matinee as an institution( and 
this may be simply the result of motherhood, rather than 
of television). But inevitably a disturbing additional 
thought suggests itself. Can it be that feminine attendance 
goes down because young married women don't want to go 
to the movies like they used to? Can it be that there is no 
longer the same unanimity among husband and wife over 
the charms of the local Bijou? 



TOGETHERNESS" A FACTOR 



Available sociological evidence suggests that despite the 
traditional popularity of a man's night out with the boys 
and his wife's bridge date with the girls, the big trend 
these days is toward more of what has been dubbed to- 
getherness. Husband and wife are doing more things to- 
gether these days. There are more female baseball fans 
than ever, more family plan travel arrangements than ever. 
The wives have taken up the things their husbands like 
best, from skiing to shopping at night in the drive-in store 
areas. 

Some activities, however, have resisted this change. The 
high fi husband is apt to have a wife who couldn't tell full 
frequency from a tonal distortion ; the chances of there 
being two TV wrestling addicts in the same double har- 
ness are not maximal. 

And the motion picture theatre at the moment is in the 
limbo between togetherness and separatism. It is a dis- 
tinct but limited enthusiasm for most young marrieds. 
Husband and wife like the movies in varying degree. They 
go to the theatre, all other things being equal, when they 
find a movie that appeals to both of them. Thanks in part 
to the content of motion pictures and in part to the way 
they are sold, only a fraction of the films made each year 
represents this common middle ground which appeals to 
both husband and wife. 

But meanwhile other things have come along which ap- 



peal equally to both sexes. In the main, this is increasing 
ly true of vacations (which are longer and cost mon 
money than formerly) and shopping (which, particular!} 
in the multi-faceted shopping centers, provides newfounc 
interest for the males of the family). The purchase of 
house is apt to make do-it-yourself addits of both the aver 
age husband and the average wife. 

The concept of togetherness, catered to by the drive-ir 
theatre, often overshadows the film attraction there. Bu 
the conventional four-wali theatre has no such advantage 
The attraction on the marquee is much more impcrtan 
here, where there is no children's playground, no vast re 
freshment area and no privacy quite like sitting in youi 
own car. 

It is commonly observed in the industry, particularly bj 
neighborhood and small town theatre operators, that w 
need more family pictures. A study of the trends of ou: 
population suggests that this may be a misleading idea 
Perhaps what we need are more pictures which appeal tc 
both him and her, as male and female, while we worry less 
about what appeals to their offspring. 

In previous articles of this series the point has beer 
made that men and women often require different kinds o 
selling and that various American industries use a differ 
ent approach for each sex, to sell the same product to hus 
band and wife. There are many instances, of course, where 
a product or a sales campaign has universal appeal withou 
sex differentiation. 

But in the sale of motion pictures there is usually less 
this universality than you may think. As one observer ha 
put it, "Most motion pictures are either masculine or femi 
nine; not too many are neuter." And this is true of mo 
tion picture advertising. 



THE ADVERTISING PITCH 



This isn't a criticism of the creative abilities of movie 
makers or promoters. It traces essentially to the fact that 
with advertising costs what they are today the average 
movie simply does not have sufficient budgetary resources 
to be sold with female appeal to women and over again 
with male appeal to men. Therefore, time after time, a 
picture starts off with a promotional approach that is either 
predominantly for one sex or, in its aim at being attractive 
to both male and female, ultimately neuter. 

The age at which men and women are most conscious of 
each other's tastes is the young married age. This is the 
time when they want to enjoy entertainment together, and 
when they want entertainment that they can both enjoy. 
One of the hardest jobs is to combine the masculine and 
feminine appeal in the same package. 

The individual theatre operator has a basic responsibili- 
ty in this job. More and more, the press book he receives 
is apt to contain several different advertising approaches. 
He must show discrimination and a good knowledge of his 
market in picking the ads he will use. Some will have 

(Continued on Puge 23) 



0, 



Page 22 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



EHE YDUNG MAHHIED5 

Kmtinued from Page 22) 

reater masculine appeal, some more female pulling power, 
pme in between. 

It might, as a matter of fact, be a distinct service to ex- 
ibitors if some kind of reliable pre-testing of the various 
dvertising approaches on a picture could be adopted, so 
hat the press book ads would carry pre-test ratings such 
s "appeal is 80% masculine over age 20" or "preferred ad 
or 72% of women 15-45" and so forth. 

This same sort of pre-testing has already proven helpful 
o the major distributors in reorienting some of their ad- 
ertising copy. If you compare today's advertising on the 



whole with that of three or four years ago, for example, 
you will be able to detect a considerable shift away from 
the exclusively masculine to a more general line. 

But there is a difference between appealing to that amor- 
phous thing called a family and the very specific market 
composed of men and women married to each other. The 
towel manufacturer sells a batch of towels labeled His and 
Hers; they aren't labeled Ours. Similarly, the successful 
vendor of motion picture entertainment for the young 
married generation makes his success with films which 
might be termed both His and Hers. The old showmen 
who used to speak of combining sex for the men with sobs 
for the women were righter, perhaps, than we once sus- 
pected. 



:0CA COLA'S EXAMPLE OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVERTISING 



Continued from Page 9) 

A/ou!d Such Advertising Sell Movies? 

In recent years much criticism has been directed against 
notion picture advertising. It has come from many 
;ources, including exhibitors. According to the critics the 
idvertising is blatant, banal, bawdy, misleading and inef- 
ective. So far as we know, these criticisms have not been 
iccompanied by concrete suggestions for improvements. 
That does not alter the fact that movie advertising does 
;eem to be in a rut. 

Perhaps the apparent sameness is because most publicity 
imanates from the film companies and is tied to particular 
Dictures. While screen stories vary widely the basic ele 
nents are mostly the same. Consequently, advertising 
Dased wholly on the pictures tends toward a monotonous 
iniformity. The illustrations feature the same situations ; 
:he only difference is that the actors sometimes do their 
sissing standing up, sometimes sitting down, and occa- 
sionally in less conventional postures. 

We cannot help wondering what the public response 
would have been had the ad in question been a movie ad 
instead of Coca-Cola ad. Essentially, it is institutional ad- 
vertising rather than program advertising. The theatre is 
presented attractively as a place where one would like to 
be. The people are the kind most folks would like to asso- 
ciate with. Perhaps there never was an ad that made 
movie-going seem so attractive. And suppose the legend 
had read something like this: 

"Your oun good taste selects the movie . . . and your 
good taste will be confirmed when you go to see 
'Friendly Persuasion'. 

"Discriminating people pronounce this picture, starring 
Gary Cooper end Dorothy McGuire. to be superb, enter- 
tainment for the entire family. 

"And when you have seen and enjoyed this wholesome 
and delightful picture, why not tell your friends about 
it so they can share the fun?" 



Maybe Others Will 

Perhaps this is too revolutionary a step for the film com- 
panies to take. Admittedly they are handicapped when it 
comes to innovations in exploitating pictures which they 
are distributing for independent producers. And in any 
case they are naturally more concerned over the success of 
their current opus than the fate of the theatres. Possibly 
they have considered the institutional type of advertising 
and rejected it for reasons satisfactory to themselves, even 
if not apparent to us. 

If the film companies cannot be induced to bring the the- 
atres into their national advertising, maybe other suppliers 
will take a cue from Coca-Cola. Pepsi-Cola, National Car- 
bon and others have attested their regard for their theatre 
customers by their support of the exhibitor and Variety 
Club Conventions. Maybe if the exhibitors properly ex- 
press their appreciation these suppliers can be induced to 
mention the theatre frequently in their ads and thus spread 
the benefits over the entire year. 

The theatres are valuable retail outlets for many con- 
cession items and the manufacturers and ventors thereof 
can help keep those outlets open and prosperous by giving 
them favorable mention in their advertising. All who make 
money out of the movies have a stake in the perpetuation 
of the theatres and should do all they can to stimulate the- 
atre attendance. 

The systematic disparagement of both the pictures and 
the theatres in recent years has cost the theatres a vast 
amount of patronage. This has reached a point in some 
communities where it is considered not quite nice to go to 
the movies. In order to regain that mid-week adult attend- 
ance which has almost disappeared, the public must be 
assured not only that the pictures are good, but that the 
theatres are clean, comfortable, and orderly. Coca-Cola 
has done much to convince the public that 

IT'S SMART TO GO TO THE MOVIES 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 23 



THE YDUNG MARHIED5 

Problem of Appealing to Both Sexes 



(Continued from Page l.'i) 

close moviegoing tie to her children, when she is 36 and 
still close to being a member of the young marrieds. 

Thus it becomes increasingly wise for the motion pic- 
ture industry to maintain the appeal of moviegoing for the 
young married before, during and after their status 
changes from newiyweds to family unit. And this is where 
an unknown statistic deserves consideration. 

We know that more men than women go to the movies. 
We do not as yet have a breakdown of age and marital 
categories. For example, it is believed that more teenaged 
girls than boys go to the movies. If this is the case, then 
the overall preponderance of male patronage must trace 
to the fact that among the young married age group par- 
ticularly, the females have cut down on their moviegoing. 

What causes this apparent cut-down? To a certain ex- 
tent, of course, it is due to the fact that many young wom- 
en will not go to the movies alone, while men will. It is 
also directly attributable, in the opinion of some film peo- 
ple, to the decline of the matinee as an institution( and 
this may be simply the result of motherhood, rather than 
of television). But inevitably a disturbing additional 
thought suggests itself. Can it be that feminine attendance 
goes down because young married women don't want to go 
to the movies like they used to? Can it be that there is no 
longer the same unanimity among husband and wife over 
the charms of the local Bijou? 



TOGETHERNESS" A FACTOR 



Available sociological evidence suggests that despite the 
traditional popularity of a man's night out with the boys 
and his wife's bridge date with the girls, the big trend 
these days is toward more of what has been dubbed to- 
getherness. Husband and wife are doing more things to- 
gether these days. There are more female baseball fans 
than ever, more family plan travel arrangements than ever. 
The wives have taken up the things their husbands like 
best, from skiing to shopping at night in the drive-in store 
areas. 

Some activities, however, have resisted this change. The 
high fi husband is apt to have a wife who couldn't tell full 
frequency from a tonal distortion; the chances of there 
being two TV wrestling addicts in the same double har- 
ness are not maximal. 

And the motion picture theatre at the moment is in the 
limbo between togetherness and separatism. It is a dis- 
tinct but limited enthusiasm for most young marrieds. 
Husband and wife like the movies in varying degree. They 
go to the theatre, all other things being equal, when they 
find a movie that appeals to both of them. Thanks in part 
to the content of motion pictures and in part to the way 
they are sold, only a fraction of the films made each year 
represents this common middle ground which appeals to 
both husband and wife. 

But meanwhile other things have come along which ap- 

Page 22 Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 



peal equally to both sexes. In the main, this is increasing 
ly true of vacations (which are longer and cost mori 
money than formerly) and shopping (which, particularly 
in the multi-faceted shopping centers, provides newfounc 
interest for the males of the family). The purchase of ; 
house is apt to make do-it-yourself addits of both the aver 
age husband and the average wife. 

The concept of togetherness, catered to by the drive-ir j 
theatre, often overshadows the film attraction there. Bu 
the conventional four-wali theatre has no such advantage 
The attraction on the marquee is much more impcrtan ; 
here, where there is no children's playground, no vast re 
freshment area and no privacy quite like sitting in youi « 
own car. 

It is commonly observed in the industry, particularly bj 
neighborhood and small town theatre operators, that w< 
need more family pictures. A study of the trends of our 
population suggests that this may be a misleading idea 
Perhaps what we need are more pictures which appeal tc 
both him and her, as male and female, while we worry less 1 
about what appeals to their offspring. 

In previous articles of this series the point has beer 
made that men and women often require different kinds oi 
selling and that various American industries use a differ 
ent approach for each sex, to sell the same product to hus 
band and wife. There are many instances, of course, where 
a product or a sales campaign has universal appeal withou) 
sex differentiation. 

But in the sale of motion pictures there is usually less o 
this universality than you may think. As one observer haz 
put it, "Most motion pictures are either masculine or femi- 
nine ; not too many are neuter." And this is true of mo- 
tion picture advertising. 



THE ADVERTISING PITCH 



This isn't a criticism of the creative abilities of movie 
makers or promoters. It traces essentially to the fact that 
with advertising costs what they are today the average 
movie simply does not have sufficient budgetary resources 
to be sold with female appeal to women and over again 
with male appeal to men. Therefore, time after time, a 
picture starts off with a promotional approach that is either 
predominantly for one sex or, in its aim at being attractive 
to both male and female, ultimately neuter. 

The age at which men and women are most conscious of 
each other's tastes is the young married age. This is the 
time when they want to enjoy entertainment together, and 
when they want entertainment that they can both enjoy. 
One of the hardest jobs is to combine the masculine and 
feminine appeal in the same package. 

The individual theatre operator has a basic responsibili- 
ty in this job. More and more, the press book he receives 
is apt to contain several different advertising approaches. I 
He must show discrimination and a good knowledge of his 
market in picking the ads he will use. Some will have i 

(Continued on Page 23) % 



THE YOUNG MARHIEDS 

Continued from Page 22) 

jreater masculine appeal, some more female pulling power, 
some in between. 

It might, as a matter of fact, be a distinct service to ex- 
libitors if some kind of reliable pre-testing of the various 
idvertising approaches on a picture could be adopted, so 
:hat the press book ads would carry pre-test ratings such 
}s "appeal is 80% masculine over age 20" or "preferred ad 
or 72% of women 15-45" and so forth. 

This same sort of pre-testing has already proven helpful 
:o the major distributors in reorienting some of their ad- 
vertising copy. If you compare today's advertising on the 



whole with that of three or four years ago, for example, 
you will be able to detect a considerable shift away from 
the exclusively masculine to a more general line. 

But there is a difference between appealing to that amor- 
phous thing called a family and the very specific market 
composed of men and women married to each other. The 
towel manufacturer sells a batch of towels labeled His and 
Hers; they aren't labeled Ours. Similarly, the successful 
vendor of motion picture entertainment for the young 
married generation makes his success with films which 
might be termed both His and Hers. The old showmen 
who used to speak of combining sex for the men with sobs 
for the women were righter, perhaps, than we once sus- 
pected. 



COCA COLA'S EXAMPLE OF INSTITUTIONAL ADVERTISING 



\'Continued from Page 9) 

Would Such Advertising Sell Movies? 

In recent years much criticism has been directed against 
motion picture advertising. It has come from many 
sources, including exhibitors. According to the critics the 
advertising is blatant, banal, bawdy, misleading and inef- 
fective. So far as we know, these criticisms have not been 
accompanied by concrete suggestions for improvements. 
That does not alter the fact that movie advertising does 
seem to be in a rut. 

Perhaps the apparent sameness is because most publicity 
emanates from the film companies and is tied to particular 
pictures. While screen stories vary widely the basic ele 
ments are mostly the same. Consequently, advertising 
based wholly on the pictures tends toward a monotonous 
uniformity. The illustrations feature the same situations ; 
the only difference is that the actors sometimes do their 
kissing standing up, sometimes sitting down, and occa- 
sionally in less conventional postures. 

We cannot help wondering what the public response 
would have been had the ad in question been a movie ad 
instead of Coca-Cola ad. Essentially, it is institutional ad- 
vertising rather than program advertising. The theatre is 
presented attractively as a place where one would like to 
be. The people are the kind most folks would like to asso- 
ciate with. Perhaps there never was an ad that made 
movie-going seem so attractive. And suppose the legend 
had read something like this: 

"Your own good taste selects the movie . . . and your 
good taste will be confirmed when you go to see 
'Friendly Persuasion . 

"Discriminating people pronounce this picture, starring 
Gary Cooper and Dorothy McGuirc. to be superb, enter- 
tainment /or the entire family. 

"And when you have seen and enjoyed this wholesome 
and delightful picture, tchy not tell your friends about 
it so they can share the fun?" 



Maybe Others Will 

Perhaps this is too revolutionary a step for the film com- 
panies to take. Admittedly they are handicapped when it 
comes to innovations in exploitating pictures which they 
are distributing for independent producers. And in any 
case they are naturally more concerned over the success of 
their current opus than the fate of the theatres. Possibly 
they have considered the institutional type of advertising 
and rejected it for reasons satisfactory to themselves, even 
if not apparent to us. 

If the film companies cannot be induced to bring the the- 
atres into their national advertising, maybe other suppliers 
will take a cue from Coca-Cola. Pepsi-Cola, National Car- 
bon and others have attested their regard for their theatre 
customers by their support of the exhibitor and Variety 
Club Conventions. Maybe if the exhibitors properly ex- 
press their appreciation these suppliers can be induced to 
mention the theatre frequently in their ads and thus spread 
the benefits over the entire year. 

The theatres are valuable retail outlets for many con- 
cession items and the manufacturers and ventors thereof 
can help keep those outlets open and prosperous by giving 
them favorable mention in their advertising. All who make 
money out of the movies have a stake in the perpetuation 
of the theatres and should do all they can to stimulate the- 
atre attendance. 

The systematic disparagement of both the pictures and 
the theatres in recent years has cost the theatres a vast 
amount of patronage. This has reached a point in some 
communities where it is considered not quite nice to go to 
the movies. In order to regain that mid-week adult attend- 
ance which has almost disappeared, the public must be 
assured not only that the pictures are good, but that the 
theatres are clean, comfortable, and orderly. Coca-Cola 
has done much to convince the public that 

IT'S SMART TO GO TO THE MOVIES 



Film BULLETIN March 18, 1957 Page 23 



THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT I 



All The Vital Details <m Current &> Coming Features 

(Date of Film BULLETIN Review Appears At End of Synopsis) 



November 

BLONDE SINNER Diana Dors. Producer Kenneth 
Harper. Director J. Lee Thompson. Drama. A con- 
demned murderess in the death cell. 74 min. 
FRIENDLY PERSUASION Deluxe Color. Gary Cooper, 
Dorothy McGuire, Marjorie Main, Robert Middleton. 
Producer-director William Wyler. Drama. The story 
of a Quaker family during the Civil War. 139 min. 10/1 

December 

HIGH TERRACE Dale Robertson, Lois Maxwell. Pro- 
ducer Robert Baker. Director H. Cass. Drama. Famous 
impresario is killed by young actress. 77 min. 
HOT SHOTS Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. Producer 
Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Comedy. Ju- 
venile television star is kidnapped. 62 min. 

January 

CHAIN OF EVIDENCE Bill Elliot, James Lydon, Claudia 
Barrett. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Paul Landres. 
Melodrama. Former convict is innocent suspect in 
planned murder. 63 min. 

February 

HOLD THAT HYPNOTIST Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Austen Jewell. Comedy 
drama. Bowery Boys tangle with unscrupulous hypnotist. 
61 min. 

LAST Of THE BADMEN CinemaScope, Color. George 
Montgomery, James Best. Producer Vineent Fennelly. 
Director Paul Landres. Western. Outlaws use detective 
as only recogni»able man in their holdups, thus in- 
creasing reward for his death or capture. 81 min. 

March 

ATTACK Of THE CRAB MONSTERS Richard Garland, 
Pamela Duncan. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. Hideous monsters take over remote 
Pacific Island. 68 min. 

FOOTSTEPS IN THE NIGHT Bill Elliot, Don Haggerty. 
Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Jean Yarbrough. Melo- 
drama. Man is sought by police for murder of his 
friend. 62 min. 

NOT OF THIS EARTH Paul Birch, Beverly Garland. 
Producer-director Roger Corman. Science-fiction. Series 
of strange murders plagues large western city. 67 min. 

April 

BADGE OF MARSHALL BRENNAN Jim Davis, Carl 
Smith, Arleen Whelan. Producer-director Albert C. 
Gannaway. Western. 76 min. 

DRAGOON WELLS MASSACRE Barry Sullivan, Mona 
Freeman, Dennis O'Keefe. Producer Lindsley Parsons. 
Director Harold Schuster. Western. Apaches attack 
stockade in small western town. 81 min. 

May 

DAUGHTER Of DR. JEKYLL John Agar, Gloria Talbot, 
Arrnur Shields. Producer Jack Pollexfen. Director 
Edgar Unger. Horror. 

DESTINATION 60,000 Preston Foster, Coleen Gray, Jeff 
Donnell. A Gross-Krasne Production. Director G. Wag- 
gner. Drama. 

JEANNIE CinemaScope, Color. Vera Ellen, Tony Martin, 
Robert Fleming. Producer Marcel Hellman. Director 
Henry Levin. Musical. Small-town girl meets washing 
machine inventor in Paris. 105 min. 

PERSUADER, THE William Talman, Kristine Miller, 
James Craig. Producer-director Dick Ross. 

Coming 

BADGE OF MARSHAL ERENNAN Jim Davis. Producer- 
director Albert Gannaway. Western. 

DINO Sal Mineo, Brian Keith, Susan Kohner. Producer 
Bernice Block. Director Thomas Carr. Social case 
worker helps young criminal reform. 

DISEMBODIED, THE Paul Burke, Allison Hayes, Joel 
Marston. Producer Ben Schwalb. Director Walter 
Graumann. 

HOT ROD RUMBLE Leigh Snowden, Richard Hartunian. 
Producer Norman Herman. Director Les Martinson. 
Story of a drag racer and his fight for acceptance. 
HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME, THE CinemaScope, 
Color. Gina Lollobrigida . Anthony Quinn. A Paris 
Production. Director Jean Delannoy. Drama. Hunch- 
back falls in love with beautiful gypsy girl. 88 min. 
LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON Color. Gary Cooper, 
Audrey Hepburn, Maurice Chevalier. Producer-director 
Billy Wilder. Drama. 

OKLAHOMAN, THE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Joel 
McCrea, Barbara Hale. Producer Walter Mirsch. Di- 
rector Francis Lyon. Western. Doctor helps rid town 
•f unscrupulous brothers. 81 min. 



SKIN DIVE GIRL Mara Corday, Pat Conway, Florence 
Marly. Producer Norman Herman. 

SPOOK CHASERS Hunti Hall, Stanley Clements. Pro- 
ducer Ben Schwalb. Director George Blair. Comedy. 



COLUMBIA 



November 

ODONGO Technicolor, CinemaScope. Macdonald 
Carey, Rhonda Fleming, Juma. Producer Irving Allen. 
Director John Gilling. Adventure. Owner of wild ani- 
mal farm in Kenya saves young native boy from a 
violent death. 91 min. 

REPRISAL Technicolor. Guy Madison, Felicia Farr, 
Kathryn Grant. Producers, Rackmil-Ainsworth. Direc- 
tor George Sherman. Adventure. Indians fight for 
rights in small frontier town. 74 min. 

SILENT WORLD. THE Eastman Color. Adventure film 
covers marine explorations of the Calypso Oceono- 

?raphic Expeditions. Adapted from book by Jacques- 
ves Cousteau. 86 min. 10/15. 
WHITE SQUAW. THE David Brian, May Wynn, William 
Bishop. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Drama. Indian maiden helps her people sur- 
vive injustice of white men. 73 min. 

YOU CAN'T RUN AWAY FROM IT Technicolor, Cine- 
maScope. June Allyson, Jack Lemmon, Charles Bick- 
ford. Produced-director Dick Powell. Musical. Reporter 
wins heart of oil and cattle heiress. 95 min. 10/15. 

December 

LAST MAN TO HANG. THE Tom Conway, Elizabeth 
Sellars. Producer John Gossage. Director Terence 
Fisher. Melodrama. Music critic is accused of murder- 
ing his wife in a crime of passion. 75 min. 11/12. 
MAGNIFICENT SEVEN. THE Takashi Shimura Toshiro 
Mifune. A Toho Production. Director Akira Kurosawa. 
Mekjdrama. Seven Samurai warriors are hired by far- 
mers for protection against maurauders. 158 min. 12/10 
RUMBLE ON THE DOCKS James Darren, Jerry Janger, 
Edgar Barrier. Drama. Teenage gang wars and water- 
front racketeers. 82 min. 12/10. 

SEVENTH CAVALRY, THE Technicolor. Randolph ScoH, 
Barbara Hale. Producer Harry Brown. Director Joseph 
Lewis. Western. An episode in the qlory of General 
Custer's famed "7th Cav.". 75 min. 12/10. 

January 

DON'T KNOCK THE ROCK Bill Haley and his Comets, 
Alan Freed, AUo Del*. Producer Sam Katzman. Direc- 
tor fired Sears. Musical Life and times of a famous 
rock and roll singer. 80 min. 1/7. 

RIDE THE HIGH IRON Don Taylor, Sally Forest, Ray- 
mond Burr. Producer William Self. Director Don Weis. 
Drama. Park Avenue scandal is hushed up by public 
relations experts. 74 min. 

ZARAK Technicolor, CinemaScope. Victor Mature, 
Michael Wilding, Anita Ekberg. A Warwick Production. 
Director Terence Young. Drama. Son of wealthy ruler 
becomes notorious bandit. 99 min. 12/24. 

February 

NIGHTFALL Aldo Ray, Anne Bancroft. Producer Ted 
Richmond. Director Jacques Tourneur. Drama. Mistaken 
identity of a doctor's bag starts hunt for stolen money. 
78 min. 12/10. 

UTAH BLAINE Rory Calhoun, Susan Cummings, Angela 
Stevens. Producer Sam Katiman. Director Fred Sears. 
Western. Two men join hand* because they see in each 
other a way to have revenge on their enemies. 75 min. 

WICKED AS THEY COME Arlene Dahl, Phil Carey. Pro- 
ducer Maxwell Setton. Director Ken Hughes. Drama. A 
beautiful oirl wins a beauty contest and a "different" 
life. 132 min. 1/21. 

March 

FULL OF LIFE Judy Holliday, Richard Conte, 
Salvatore Baccaloni. Producer Fred Kohlmar. Director 
Richard Quine. Comedy. Struggling writer and wife 
are owners of new home and are awaiting arrival of 
child. 91 min. 1/7. 

MAN WHO TURNED TO STONE, THE Victor Jory, Ann 
Doran. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Leslie Kardos. 
Mad doctor discovers secret of prolonged life. Horror. 
80 min. 2/18. 

SHADOW ON THE WINDOW, THE Betty Garrett, Phil 
Carey, Corey Allen. Producer Jonie Tapia. Director 
William Asher. Melodrama. Sev«n-year old boy is the 
only witness to a murder. 73 min. 3/4. 

ZOMBIES OF MORA TAU Gregg Palmer, Allison Hayes. 
Producer Sam Katzman. Director Edward Kahn. Horror. 
Zombies live on sunken ship with huge fortune of dia- 
monds. 70 min. 



April 

GUNS AT FORT PETTICOAT Audie Murptiy, Kathryn 
Grant. Producer Harry Joe Brown. Director George 
Marshall. Western. Army officer organizes women to 
fight off Indian attack. 

PHANTOM STAGECOACH, THE William Bishop Rich- 
ard Webb. Producer Wallace MacDonald. Director Ray 
Nazarro. Western. Outlaws attempt to drive stage 
coach line out of business. 

SEVEN WAVES AWAY CinemaScope. Tyrone Power, 
Mai Zetterling. Drama. 

STRANGE ONE. THE Ben Gaziara, James Olsen, George 
Peppard. Producer Sam Spiegel. Director James Gar- 
fein. Drama. Cadet at military school frames com- 
mander and his son. 97 min. 

Coming 

BEYOND MOMBASA Technicolor, CinemaScope. Cor- 
nell Wilde, Donna Reed. Producer Tony Owen. Direc- 
tor George Marshall. Adventure. Leopard Men seek 
to keep Africa free of white men. 

CASE OF THE STOCKING KILLER, THE John Mills, 
Charles Coburn, Barbara Bates. A Marksman Produc- 
tion. Director John Gillerman. Insane man murders 
beautiful girl. 

CHA-CHA-CHA BOOM Perez Prado, Helen Grayson, 
Manny Lopez. Producer Sam Katzman. Director Fred 
Sears. Musical. Cavalcade of the mambo. 78 min. 10/15 
FIRE DOWN BELOW CinemaScope, Technicolor. Rita 
Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lemmon. A War- 
wick Production. Director Robert Parrish. Drama 
Cargo on ship is ablaze. Gravity of situation is in 
creased by highly explosive nitrate. 
GARMENT JUNGLE. THE Lee J. Cobb, Kerwin Mat- 
thews, Richard Boone. Producer Harry Kleiner. Di 
rector Ribert Aldrich. Drama. Dog-ea-dog world 
Manhattan's clothing center. 

GOLDEN VIRGIN. THE Joan Crawford, Rossano Brazzi 
Heather Sears. John and James Woolf producers. Di 
rector David Miller. Unscrupulous people exploit blind 
girl for profit. 

KILLER APE Johnny Weissmuller. Carol Thurston. Pro- 
ducer Sam Katzman. Director Spencer G. Bennett. Ad 
venture drama. The story of a giant half-ape, half-man 
beast who goes on a killing rampage until destroyed 
by Jungle Jim. 68 min. 

PAPA, MAMA. THE MAID AND I Robert Lamoureux 
Gaby Morlay, Nicole Courcel. Director Jean-Paul Le 
Chanois. Comedy. The lives of a typically Parisian 
family. 94 min. 9/17. 

PICKUP ALLEY Victor Mature. Anita Ekberg, Trevor 
Howard. A Warwick Production. Director John Gilling 
Story of international dope runners. 

SHE PLAYED WITH FIRE Jack Hawkins, Arlene Dahl 
Producers Frank Launder-Sidney Gilliat. Director Sid 
ney Gilliat. Story of an arsonist. 

SUICIDE MISSION Leif Larson, Michael Aldridge, Atle 
Larsen. A North Seas Film Production. Adventure. Nor- 
wegian fishermen smash German blockade in World 
War II. 70 min. 

TALL T, THE Randolph Scott, Richard Boone, Maureen 
Sullivan. A Scott-Brown Production. Director Budd 
Boetticher. Western. A quiet cowboy battles o be 
independent. 78 min. 

27TH DAY. THE Gene Barry, Valerie French. Producer 
Helen Ainsworth. Direotor' William Asher. Science 
tiotion. People from outer space plot to destroy all 
human life on the earth. 75 min. 

YOUNG DON'T CRY, THE Sal Mineo, James Whitmore 
Producer P. Waxman. Director Alfred Werker. Drama 
Life in a southern orphanage. 



INDEPENDENTS 



November 

IT CONQUERED THE WORLD (American International) 
Peter Graves, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Science-fiction. A monster from outer 
space takes control of the world until a scientist gives 
his life to save humanity. 

MARCELINO (United Motion Picture Organization) 
Pabilto Calvo, Rafael Rivelles. Director Ladislao 
Vadja. Drama. Franciscan monks find abandoned baby 
and adopt him. 90 min. 11/12. 

SECRETS OF LIFE (Buena Vista). Latest in Walt Dis 
ney's true-life scenes. 75 min. 10/29. 

WEE GORDIE (George K. Arthur) Bill Travers, Elastair 
Sim, Norah Gorsen. Producer Sidney Gilliat. Director 
Frank Launder. Comedy. A frail lad grows to giant 
stature and wins the Olympic hammer-throwing cham 
pionship. 94 min. 11/12. 

WESTWARD HO. THE WAGONS (Buena Vista) Cine 
maScope, Technicolor. Fess Parker, Kathleen Crowley 
A Walt Disney Production. Adventure. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



APRIL SUMMARY 

Features scheduled for April release 
total 23, however, later additions should 
add another half-dozen to the roster. 20th 
Century-Fox will be the leading supplier 
with four films, while Columbia, United 
Artists, Universal and Warner Bros, will 
release three each. Allied Artists and 
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer will release two 
each; Paramount, Republic and the Inde- 
pendents, one each. 14 of the April re- 
leases will be dramas. Eight films v/ill be 
in color, five in CinemaScope, one in 
VistaVision, one in Naturama, one in 
Technirama. 

14 Dramas 2 Comedies 

4 Westerns 1 Melodrama 

1 Musical 1 Science-fiction 



December 

ABY AND THE BATTLESHIP. THE IDCA) Richard 
vttenborou^h, Lisa Gastoni. Producer Anthony Darn- 
lorough. Director Jay Lewis. Comedy. Baby is 
muggled aboard a British battleship during mock 
laneuvers. 

IOUR OF DECISION (Astor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
■rama. 

' A SORCIERE (Ellis Films) Marina Vlady, Nicole 
II Sour* I. Director Andre Michel. Drama. A young French 

ogineer meets untamed forest maide* while working 

i Sweden. French dialogue, English subtitles. 

*EN Of SHERWOOD FOREST I Astor Pictures) East- 
I lan Color. Don Taylor. Producer Michael Carreras. 

•irector Val Guest. Adventure. Story of Robin Hood 
I nd his men. 78 min. 

IOCK. ROCK, ROCK IDCA). Alan Freed, LaVern 
l aker, Frankle Lyman. A yanguard Producticn. Musical 
, >anorama of rock and roll. 

,NOW WAS BLACK. THE (Continental) Daniel Gelin. 
'alentine Tessjer. A Tellus Film. French language film. 
)rama. Study of an embittered young man who lives 
<ith mother in her house of ill fame. 105 min. 

WO LOVES HAVE I (Jacon) Technicolor. Gabriele 
•erzerti, Marta Toren. A Rinoli FMm. Directed Carmine 
S-atlone. Dra.ma. Life of Puccini with exerpts from his 
>est known operas. 

January 

OBERT SCHWEITZER (Hill and Anderson) Eastman 
",o\or. Firm biography of the famous Nobel Prlie win- 
er with narritive by Burgess Merideth. Producer-direc- 
or James Hill. Documentary. 

IULLFIGHT (Janus).. French made documentary offers 
listory and performance of the famous sport. Produced 
ind directed by Pierre Braunberger. 74 min. 11/24. 

SAR (Astor Pictures) Ingrrd Bergman, Mathlas Wie- 
nan. Director Roberto Rosiellinl. Drama. Young 
narried woman is mercilessly exploited by Wackmailer. 
14 min. 

tUNAWAY DAUGHTERS (American-International) 
vlarla English, Anna Sten. Producer AJex Gordon. Di- 
eetor Edward Cahn. Drama. A study of modern teen- 
ige problems. 

SHAKE, RATTLE AND ROCK I American-International) 
Jsa Gaye, Touch Conners. Producer James Nicholson, 
director Edward Cahn. Musical. A story of "rock and 
oil" music. 

/ITTELONI (API-Jawis) . Franco Interlenghi, Leonora 
: abrizi. Producer Mario de Veechi. Director F. Fel- 
Ini. Comedy. Story of unemployed young men in Italy. 
103 min. 1 1/26. 

fVE ARE ALL MURDERERS IKingsley International) 
Parcel Mouloudii, Raymond Pellegrin. Director Andre 
Sayette. Drama. 

February 

3ED OF GRASS U>ans-Lux) Anna Brazzou. Made in 
Sreece. English titles. Drama A beautiful girl is per- 
secuted by her villiage for Having lost her virtue as 
•he victim of a rapist. 

CYCLOPS, THE (RKO) James Craig, Gloria Talbot. 
Producer-director Bert Gordon. Science-fiction. Story 
if a monster moon. 

FLESH AND THE SPUR ( American-International) Color. 

John Agar, Maria English, Touch Connors. Producer 

Alex Gordon. Director E. Cehn. Western. Two men 

search for a gang of outlaw killers. 86 min. 

SUITY (RKO) Technicolor. John Justin, Barbara Laage. 

Orama. 

HOUR OF DECISION lAstor Pictures) Jeff Morrow, 
Hazel Court. Producer Monty Berman. Director Denn- 
ngton Richards. Melodrama. Columnist's wife is in- 
nocently involved in blackmail and murder. 70 min. 
NAKED PARADISE I American-International) Color. 
Richard Denny, Beverly Garland. Producer-director 
Roger Corman. Drama. Man and woman bring Ha- 
waiian smugglers to justice. 72 min. 

SILKEN AFFAIR. THE (RKO) David Niven, Genevieve 
Page, Ronald Squire. Producer Fred Feldkamp. Director 
Roy Kelling. Comedy. An auditor, on j kindly impulse, 
alters the accounting records. 96 mm. 
ITMPEST IN THE FLESH (Pacemaker Pictures) Ray- 
mond Pellegrin, Francoise Arnoul. Director Ralph 
"Ubib. French film, English titles. Drama. Study of a 
founq woman with a craving for love that no number 
>f men can satisfy. 

March 

JNDEAD, THE I American-International) Pamela Dun- 
:*n, Altison Hayes. Producer-director Roger Corman. 
Science-fiction. A woman rums into a witch. 71 min. 
rOODOO WOMAN (American-International) Maria 
rngllsh, Tom Conway, Touch Connors. Producer Alex 
Portion. Director Edward Cahn. Horror. Adventuress 
leeting native treasure is transformed into monster by 
ungle scientist. 75 min. 

WOMAN OF ROME I DC A i Gina Lollobrigida, Daniel 
Selin. A Porrfi-DeLaurenflis Production. Director Luigi 
£amba. Drama. Adapted from the Alberto Moravia 
lovel. 

April 

F ALL THE GUYS IN THE WORLD . . . (Buena Vista) 
^dre Valrny, Jean Gaven. Director Christian-Jaque. 
5rama. Radio "hams", thousands of miles apart, pool 
'heir efforts to rescue a stricken fishing boat. 

May 

WCK ALL NIGHT (American-International) Dick 
vliller, Abby Dalton, Russel Johnson. Producer-director 
*oger Corman. Rock n' rolT musical. 65 min. 



Coming 

CARTOUCHE (RKO) Richard Basehart, Patricia Roc. 
Producer John Nasht. Director Steve Sekely. Adventure. 
The story of a lusty adventurer during the reign of 
Louis XVI. 

CITY OF WOMEN (Associated) Osa Massen, Robert 
Hutton, Maria Palmer. Producer-director Boris Perroff. 
Drama. From a novel by Stephen Longstreet. 

DRAGSTRIP GIRL (American-International) Fay Spain, 
Steve Terrell, John Ashley. Producer Alex Gordon. Di- 
rector Edward Cahn. Story of teen-age hot rod and 
dragstrip racing kids. 75 min. 

LOST CONTINENT (IFE) CinemaScope, Ferranicolor. 
Producer-director Leonardo Bonii. An excursion into the 
wilas of Borneo and the Maylayan Arcnepelago. Eng- 
lish commentary. 86 min. 

NEAPOLITAN CAROUSEL IIFEI (Lux Film, Rome) Path.- 
color. Print by Technicolor. Sophia Loren, Leonid* 
Massin*. Director Ettore Giannini. Musical. The history 
si Naples traced from 1400 to date in song and dance. 

REMEMBER, MY LOVE (Artists-Producers Assoc.) Cine- 
maScope, Technlccior. Michael Redgrave, Mel Ferrer, 
Anthony Quale. Musical drama. Producer-director 
Michael Powell, Emeric Pressb urger. Based on Strauss' 
"Die Fledermaus". 

SMOLDERING SEA, THE Superscope. Producer Hal E. 
Chester. Drama. Conflict between the tyrannical cap- 
tain and crew of an American, merchant ship reaches 
its climax during battle of Guadalcanal. 
WEAPON. THE Superscope. Nicole Maurey. Producer 
Hal E. Chester. Drama. An unsolved murder involving 
a bitter U. S. war veteran, a German war bride and a 
killer is resolved after a child finds a loaded gun in 
bomb rubble 

X— THE UNKNOWN Dean Jagger, William Russell. 
Producer A. Hinds. Director Leslie Norman. Science- 
fiction. Keen minded scientist fights awesome creation. 



METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER 



November 

IRON PETTICOAT, THE Katherine Hepburn, 8ob Hope. 
Producer Betty Box. Director Ralph Thomas. Comedy. 
Russian lady aviatrix meets fast talking American. 
87 min. 1/21. 

December 

GREAT AMERICAN PASTIME. THE Tom Ewell, Ann 
Francis, Ann Miller. Producer Henry Berman. Director 
Nat Benchley. Comedy. Romantic antics with a Little 
League baseball background. 89 min. 
TEAHOUSE OF THE AUGUST MOON. THE Cinema- 
Scope, Eastman Color. Marlon Brando, Glenn Ford, 
Eddie Albert. Producer Jack Cummings. Director Daniel 
Mann. Comedy. Filmization of the Broadway play. 
123 min. 10/29. 

January 

ACTION OF THE TIGER CinemaScope, Color. Van 
Johnson, Martine Carol, Gustave Ro(o. A Claridge 
Production. Drama. Beautiful girl seeks halp of con- 
traband runner to rescue brother from Communists. 
EDGE OF THE CITY John Cassavetes, Sidney Poitier. 
Producer David Susskind. Director Martin Ritt. Drama. 
A man finds confidence in the future by believing 
in himself. 85 min. 1/7. 

SLANDER Van Johnson, Ann Blyth, Steve Cochran. 
Producer Armand Deutsch. Director Roy Rowland. 
Drama. Story of a scandal magazine publisher and 
his victims. 81 min. \/7. 

February 

BARRETS OF WIMPOLE STREET, THE CinemaScope, 
Eastman Color. Jennifer Jones, Sir John Gieigud, Bill 
Travers. Producer Sam Zimbalist. Director Sidney 
Franklin. Drama. Love story of poets Elizabeth Barrett 
and Robert Browning. 105 min. 1/21. 

HOT SUMMER NIGHT Leslie Nielsen, Coleen Miller. 
Producer Morton Fine. Director David Friedkin. Melo- 
drama. Story of a gangland hide-out. 84 min. 2/4. 
WINGS OF THE EAGLES, THE John Wayne, Dan 
Dailev, Maureen O'Hara. Producer Charles Schnee. 
Director John Ford. Drama. Life and times o< a naval 
aviator. 110 min. 2/4. 

March 

HAPPY ROAD. THE Gene Kelly, Michael Redgrave, 
Barbara Laage. A Kerry Production. Directors, Gene 
Kelly, Noel Coward. Drama. Two children run away 
from boarding hchool to find their respective parents. 
100 min. 2/4. 

LIZZIE Eleanor Parker, Richard Boone, Joan Btondell. 
Producer Jerry Bresster. Director Hugo Haas. Drama. 
A young girl lives three different lives. 81 min. 3/4 
TEN THOUSAND BEDROOMS CinemaScope, Techni- 
color. Dean Martin, Anna Maria Alberqhetti. Producer 
Joseph Pasternack. Director Richard Thorpe. Musical. 
A hotel tycoon falls in lave with a lovely Italian girl. 
I 14 min. 2/18. 

A pril 

DESIGNING WOMAN CinemaScope. Gregory Peck, 
Lauren Bacall, Dolores Gray. Produced Dore Schary. 
Director Vincente Minnelli. Comedy. Ace sportswriter 
marries streamlined blond with ideas. 117 min. 3/4 
VINTAGE, THE MetroColor. Pier Angeli. Mel Ferrer, 
Leif Erickson. Producer Edwin Knoph. Director Jeffrey 
Hayden. Drama. A conflict between young love and 
mature responsibility. 90 min. 



May 

LITTLE HUT, THE MetroColor. Ava Gardner, Stewart 
dranger. Producers F. Hugh Herbert. Director Mark 
Robson. Comedy. Hushand, wife and wife's lover are 
marooned on a tropical isle. 93 min. 

TARZAN AND THE LOST SAFARI Color. Gordon Scott. 
A Sol Lesser Production. 

THIS COULD BE THE NIGHT Jean Simmons. Paul 
Douglas. Producer Joe Pasternak. Director Robert 
Wise. Comedy. A girl fresh out of college gets a 
job as secretary to an ex-bootlegger. 

Coming 

LIVING IDOL. THE CinemaScope, Eastman Color. 
Steve Forrest, Lilliane Montevecchi. Producer-director 
Ai Lewin. Drama. An archeologist is faced with an un- 
worldly situation that threatens the safety of his 
adopted daughter. 98 min. 

MAN ON FIRE Bing Crosby, Mary Pickett Inger 
Stevens. Producer Sol Siegel. Director R. MacDougall. 
RAINTREE COUNTY Eastman Color, CinemaScope 55. 
Elizabeth Taylor, Montgomery Clift. Producer David 
Lewis. Director Edward Dymtryke. Drama. Life in Indi- 
ana during the middle 1800's. 

SEVENTH SIN. THE CinemaScope. Eleanor Parker, Mill 
Travers, George Sanders. Producer David Lewis. Di- 
rector Ronald Neame. 

SILK STOCKINGS MetroColor, CinemaScope. Fred As- 
taire, Cyd Charrise, Janis Page. Producer Arthur 
Freed. Director R. Mamoullian. Musical. 
SOMETHING OF VALUE Rock Hudson, Dana Wynter, 
Wendy Hitler. Producer Pandro Berman. Director 
Richard Brooks. Drama. Stry of a Mau Mau uprising 
in Kenya, East Africa. 



PARAMOUNT 



November 

MOUNTAIN, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Spencer 
Tracy, Bob Wagner, Claire Trevor. Producer-director 
Edward Dmytryk. Adventure. Two brothers climb to a 
distant snowcapped peak where an airplane has 
crashed to discover a critically injured woman in th* 
wreckage. 105. 10/15. 

December 

HOLLYWOOD OR BUST VistaVision, Technicolor. Dean 
Martin, Jerry Lewis, Anita Ekberg. Producer Hal Wal- 
lis. Director Frank Tashlin. Comedy. The adventures of 
a wild-eyed film fan who knows everything about th* 
movies. 95 min. 1.2/10. 

WAR AND PEACE VistaVision Technicolor Auore> 
Hepburn, Henry Fond*, M*l Ferrer. Producers Cartt 
Ponti. Dino de Laurentiis. Director King Viaor. Dram* 
Based on Tolstoy's novel. 208 min. 9/3. 

January 

THREE VIOLENT PEOPLE VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston, Anne Baxter, Gilbert Roland. Pro- 
ducer Hugh Brown. Director Rudy Mate. Western. Story 
of returning Confederate war veterans in Texas. 
100 min. 1/7. 

February 

RAINMAKER, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Burt Lan- 
caster, Katherine Hepburn, Wendell Corey. Producer 
Hal Wallis. Director Joseph Anthony. Comedy drama. 
Filmization of the famous B'way play. 121 min. 12/24. 

March 

FEAR STRIKES OUT Anthony Perkins, Karl Maiden, 
Norma Moore. Producer Alan Pakula. Director Perry 
Wilson. Drama. Story of the Boston baseball player. 
100 min. 2/18. 

OMAR KHAYYAM VistaVision, Technicolor. Cornel 
Wilde, Michael Rennie, Debra Paget. Producer Frank 
Freeman, Jr. Director William Dieterle. Adventure,. 
The life and rimes of medieval Persia's literary idol. 
103 min. 



BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



April 

FUNNY FACE VistaVision, Technicolor. Audaey Hep- 
burn, Fred Astaire, Kay Thompson. Producer Roger 
Edens Director Stanley Donen. Musical. Photographer 
plucks fission model from Greenwich yllfage bookshop. 
103 min. 2/18. 

May 

BUSTER KEATON STORY, THE Vista Vision, Technicolor. 
Donald O'Connor, Ann Blyth, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducers Robert Smith, Sidney Sheldon. Director Sidney 
Sheldon. Drama. Life of the great comedian. 

GUNFIGHT AT O.K. CORRAL VistaVision, Technicolor. 
Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Rhonda Fleming. Pro- 
ducer Hal Wallis. Director John Sturges. Western. 
Drunken badman hunts for murderer of his cheating 
brother 122 min. 

Coming 

BEAU JAMES VistaVision, Technicolor. Bob Hope. Pro- 
ducer Jack Rose. Director Michael Moore. Drama. 
Biography of the famous Jimmy Walker, mayor of N.Y. 
from 1925 to 1932. 1 05 min. 

DELICATE DELINQUENT. THE Jerry Lewis, Darren Mc- 
Gavin, Martha Hyer. Producer Jerry Lewis. Director 
Don McGuire. Janitor longs to be police officer so he 
can help delinquents. 101 min. 

JOKER IS WILD, THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Frank 
Sinatra, Mitii Gaynor, Jeanne Crain. Producer Samuel 
Briskm. Director Chyles Victor. Drama. Rim biography 
of Joe E. Lewis, nightclub comedian. 
LONELY MAN. THE VistaVision, Technicolor. Jack Pa- 
lance, Anthony Perkins, Elaine Aiken. Producer Pat 
Duggan. Director Henry Levin. Western. A gunfighter 
finds he Is losing his sight — and his aim. 
SPANISH AFFAIR VistaVision, Technicolor. Carmen 
Sevilla. Richard Kiley. Producer Bruce Odium. Director 
Donald Siegel. 

TEN COMMANDMENTS, THE VistaVision. Technicolor. 
Charlton Heston Yul Brynner, Anne Bax*e r . Producer- 
director Cecil B DeMille. Religious drama Life storv 
of Moses as told in the Bible and Koran. 219 min. 10/15 
TIN STAR, THE VistaVision. Henry Fonda, Anthony 
Perkins. A Perlherg-Seaton Production. Director An- 
thony Mann. V." -."stern. 



REPUBLIC 



November 

A WOMAN'S DEVOTION Trucolor. Ralph Meeker, 
Janice Rule, Paul Henreid. Producer John Bash. Direc- 
tor Paul Henreid. Drama. Recurrence of Gl's battle- 
shock illness makes him murder two girls. 88 min. 12/10 
CONGRESS DANCES. THE CinemaScope, Trucolor. 
Johanna Matz, Rudolf Prack. A Cosmos-Neusser Pro- 
duction. Drama. Intrigue and mystery in Vienna during 
the time of Prince Metternich. 90 min. 

December 

ACCUSED OF MURDER Trucolor, Naturama. David 
Brian, Vera Ralston. Melodrama. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Drama. Two-timing gangland 
lawyer is murdered by attractive girl singer. 74 min. 
IN OLD VIENNA Trucolor. Heinz Roettinger, Robert 
Klllick. Producer-director James A. Fitzpatrick. Musi- 
cal. Romances and triumphs of Franz Shubert, Johann 
Strauss, Ludwig Beethoven in the city of music, Vienna. 

January 

ABOVE UP THE WAVES John Mills, John Gregson, 
Donald Slnden. Producer W. MacQulfty. Director Ralph 
Thomas. Drama. Midget submariners attempt to sink 
German battleship in WWH. 92 min. I/M. 
TEARS FOR SIMON Eastman Color. David Farrar, 
David Knight, Julia Arnall. A J. Arthur Rank Produc- 
tion. Drama. Young American couple living in Lon- 
don have their child-stolen. 91 min. 

February 

AFFAIR IN RENO Naturama. John Lund, Doris Single- 
ton. Producer Sidney Picker. Director R. G. Spring- 
stein. Drama. Young heiress falls for fortune-hunting 
gambler. 75 min. 

DUEL AT APACHE WELLS Naturama, Trucolor. Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, Ben Cooper. Associate producer- 
director Joseph Kane. Western. Son returns home to 
find father's ranch threatened by rustler-turned-rancher. 
70 min. 

March 

SPOILERS OF THE FORREST Trucolor, Naturama. Vera 
Ralston, Rod Cameron. Producer-director Joe Kane. 
Drama. An unscrupulous lumberman tries to coerce the 
owners of a large forest acreage into cutting their 
timber at a faster rate. 

April 

HELL'S CROSSROADS Naturama. Stephen McNally, 
Peggie Castle, Robert Vauhgn. Producer Rudy Ral- 
ston. Director Franklin Adreon. Western. Outlaw cow- 
boy reforms after joining Jesse James' gang. 73 min. 



20TH CENTURY-FOX 



November 

DESPERADOS ARE IN TOWN. THE Robert Arthur, Rex 
Reason, Cathy Nolan. Producer-director K. Neumann. 
Western. A teen-age farm boy join an outlaw gang. 

73 min. 1 1/24. 



LOVE ME TENDER CinemaScope. Elvis Presley, Richard 
Egan, Debra Paget. Producer D. Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. Drama. Post-civil war story set in Kentucky 
locale. 89 min. 1 1/26. 

OKLAHOMA CinemaScope, Technicolor. Gordon Mac- 
Rae, Gloria Grahame, Shirley Jones. Producer A. Horn- 
blow, Jr. Director Fred Zinnemann. Musical. Filmiza- 
tion of the famed Broadway musical. 140 min. 

December 

ANASTASIA CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Ingrid Berg- 
man, Yul Brynner, Helen Hayes. Producer Buddy Adler. 
Director A. Litvak. Drama. Filmization of famous 
Broadway play. 105 min. 12/24. 

BLACK WHIP, THE Hugh Marlowe, Adele Mara. Pro- 
ducer R. Stabler. Director M. Warren. Drama. Outlaw 
has black whip as trademark. 77 min. 
GIRL CAN'T HELP IT. THE CinemaScope, De Luxe 
Color. Tom Ewell, Jayne Mansfield. Producer-director 
Frank TasMin. Cowiedy. Satire on rock 'h* roll. 97 
min. I/T. 

OASIS CinemaScope, Color. Michele Morgan, Cornell 
Borchers. Producer Ludwig Waldleitner and Gerd Os- 
wald. Director Yve« Allgret. Drama. Gold smuggler 
falls in love with l»dy sent to kill him. Violent ending. 
84 min. I/M. 

WOMEN OF PITCAIRN ISLAND CinemaScope. James 
Craig, John Smith, Lynn Bari. Regal Films Production. 

Director Jean Warbrough. Drama. 72 min. 3/4. 

January 

UIET GUN. THE Regalscope. Forrest Tucker, Mara 
orday. Producer-director Anthony Kimmlns. Western. 
Laramie sheriff clashes with notorious gunman. 77 min. 
SMILEY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Sir Ralph Rich- 
ardson, John McCallum, Colin Peterson. Producer- 
director Anthony Kimmins. Drama. Young Aussie boy 
has burning desire to own bicycle. 97 min. 2/18. 
THREE BRAVE MEN CinemaScope. Ray Mllland, Ernest 
Borgnine. Producer Herbert Swope, Jr. Director Philip 
Donne. Drama. Government employee ii wronged by 
too-zealous pursuit of security program. 88 min. 1/21. 

February 

OH, MEN ! OH. WOMENI CinemaScope, Color. Dan 
Dairy, Ginger Rogers, David Niven. Producer-director 
Nunnally Jonnson. Comedy. A psychiatrist finds out 
somethings he didn't know. 90 min. 3/4. 
THE TRUE STORY OF JESSIE JAMES CinemaScope. 
Robert Wagner, Jeffrey Hunter. Producer Herbert 
Swope, Jr. Director Nicholas Ray. Western. The ttves 
and times of America's outlaw gang. 92 min. 2/18. 
TWO GROOMS FOR A BRIDE Virginia Bruce, John 
Carroll. Producer Robert Baker, Monty Berman. Direc- 
tor Henry Cass. Comedy. 

March 

HEAVEN KNOWS MR, ALLISON CinemaScope De Luxe 
Color. Deborah Kerr, Robert Mitchum. Producers 
Buddy Adher, Eugene Frenke. Director John Hus+on. 
Drama. Soldier is saved by nun in South Pacific during 
World War II. 

RIVER'S EDGE, THE CinemaScope, Color. Ray Milland, 
Anthony Quinn, Debra Paget. Producer Benidict 
Bogeaos. Director Allan Dwan. Adventure. Story of a 
professional killer. 

STORM RIDER, THE Scott Brady, Mala Powers. A 
Brady-Glasser production. Director Edward Bernds. 
Western. A dust storm brings a stranger to a small 

western town. 70 min. 

April 

BOY ON A DOLPHIN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. 
Clifton Webb Alan Ladd, Sophia Loren. Producer Sam 
Engel. Director Jean Negulesco. Comedy. Romantic 
tale with a Greek background. 

CHINA GATE Nat "King" Cole, Gene Barry, Angie 
Dickinson. Producer-director S. Fuller. Drama. 
KRONOS Jeff Morrow, Barbara Lawrence, John Emery. 
Producer-director Kurt Neumann. Drama. 
SHE-DEVIL. THE Mari Blanchard, Jack Kelly, Albert 
DekVer. Producer-director Kurt Neumann. 

Coming 

ALL THAT I HAVE Walter Brennan. 

BADLANDS OF MONTANA Rex Reason, Margia Deane, 
Beverly Garland. Producer H. Knox. Director D. Ull- 
man. 

BEAUTIFUL BUT DANGEROUS Gina Lotlobrigida, Vit- 
torio Gassman. Producer Manuella Malotti. Director 
Robert Leonard. Drama. 

BERNADINE Terry Moore, Pat Boone, Janet Gaynor. 
Producer Sam Engel. Director H. Levin. Story of 
teenagers. 

BREAK IN THE CIRCLE Forrest Tucker, Eva Bartok. 
Producer M. Carreras. Director V. Guest. Drama. 
DESK SET Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn. Producer 
Henry Sphron. Director W. Lang. Filmization of the 
famous Broadway comedy. 

ISLAND IN THE SUN CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. 
James Mason, Joan fontaine, Dorothy Dandridge. Pro- 
ducer DarryJ Zanuck. Director Robert Rossen. Drama. 
LURE OF THE SWAMP William Parker, Skippy Homeir, 
Marshall Thompson. 

RESTLESS BREED, THE Eastman Color. Scott Brady, 
Anne Bancroft. Producer E. A. Alperson. Director Alan 
Dwan. 

SEA WIFE CinemaScope, DeLuxe Color. Richard Bur- 
ton, Joan Collins. Producer Andre Hakim. Director Bob 
McNaught. Drama. Ship is torpedoed by Jay submarine 
off Singapore harbor. 

THREE FACES OF EVE. THE David Wayne, Joanne 
Woodward. Producer Nunnally Johnson. 



WAY TO THE GOLD. THE Sheree North, Barry Sullivan. 
Jeffrey Hunter. Producer David Weisbart. Director R. 
Webb. 

WAYWARD BUS Jayne Mansfield, Dan Dailey, Joan' 
Collins, Rick Jason. 



UNITED ARTISTS 



November 

GUN THE MAN DOWN James Arness, Angie Dickin- 
son, Robert Wilke. Producer Robert Morrison. Director 
A. V. McLaglen. Western. Young western gunman gets 
revenge on fellow thieves who desert him when 
wounded. 78 min. 

PEACEMAKER, THE James Mitchell, Rosemarie Bowe, 
Jan Merlin. Producer Hal Makelim. Director Ted Post. 
Western. A clergyman trys to end feud between cattle- 
men and farmers. 82 min. 11/26. 

RUNNING TARGET Deluxe Color. Doris Dowling, 
Arthur Franz, Richard Reeves. Producer Jack Couffer. 
Director Marvin Weinstein. Melodrama. Escaped fugi- 
tives are chased by local townspeople and officer of 
the law. 83 min. 1 1/12. 

SHARKFIGHTERS, THE CinemaScooe, Color. Victor i 
Mature, Karen Steele. Produc-' Samuel Goldwyn, Jr. 
Director Jerry Hopper. Drar Saga of the Navy's 
"underwater-men". 73 min. IO;Vr. 

December 

BRASS LEGEND, THE Hugh O'Brian, Raymond Burr, 
Nancy Gates. Western. Producer Bob Goldstein. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Western. 79 min. 

DANCE WITH ME HENRY Bud Abbott, Lou Costello. 
Producer Robert Goldstein, Director Charles Barton. 
Comedy. 79 min. 12/24. 

KING AND FOUR QUEENS, THE CinemaScope, Color. 
Clark Gable, Eleanor Parker, Jo Van Fleet, Jean Willis, 
Barbara Nichols, Sara Shane. Producer David Hemp- 
stead. Director Raoul Walsh. Western. 86 min. 1/7. 
WILD PARTY, THE Anthony Quinn, Carol Ohmart, Paul 
Stewart. Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Harry 
Horner. Drama. Hoodlum mob take over a Naval offi- 
cer and his fiancee. 81 min. 12/10 

January 

BIG BOODLE, THE Errol Flynn, Rossana Rory. A Lewi* 
F. Blumberg Production. Director Richard Wilson. Ad- 
venture. A blackjack dealer in a Havana nightclub is 
accused of being a counterfeiter. 83 min. 2/4. 
FIVE STEPS TO DANGER Ruth Roman, Sterling Hayden. 
A Grand Production. Director Henry Kesler. Drama. 
A woman tries to give FBI highly secret material stolen 
from Russians. 80 min. 2/4. 

HALLIDAY BRAND, THE Joseph Cotten, Viveca Lind- 
fors, Betsy Blair. Producer Collier Young. Director 
Joseph Lewis. Western. Inter-family feud threatens 
father and son with disaster. 77 min. 2/4. 

February 

CRIME OF PASSION Barbara Stanwyck, Sterling 
Hayden, Raymond Burr. Producer Herman Cohen. Di- 
rector Gerd Oswald. Drama. Newspaper woman whose 

ambition for her husband leads to murder. 85 min. 1/7. 
D RAN GO Jeff Chandler, Joanne Dru. An Earlmar Pxo- 
duetion. Hall Bartlett producer-director. Adventure. 
Union officers try to bring order to a Southern town 
after the Civil War. 92 min. 

MEN IN WAR Robert Ryan, Aldo Ray, Robert Keith. 
Producer Sidney Harmon. Director Anthony Mann. 
Drama. An American Infantry platoon isolated in enemy 
territory tries to retreat during the Korean War. 
101 min. 2/4. 

TOMAHAWK TRAIL John Smith. Susan Cummings. A 
Bel Air Production. Director Robert Parry. Western. 
Cowboy versus Indians, A small band of cavalry 
soldiers, greatly outnumbered, battles with Apache 
Indians at close of the Civil War. 61 min. 
VODOO ISLAND Boris Karloff, Bevej-ly Tyler. A Bel 
Air Production. Director Reginald Le Borg. Horror. 
Writer is called upon to investigate vodooism on a 
Pacific isle. 76 min. 

March 

DELINQUENTS, THE Tommy Laughlin, Peter Miller, 
Dick Bakalyan. Imperial Productions. Robert Altman 
director. High school student and his girl victimized 
by a teen-age gang. 71 min. 

HIT AND RUN CJeo Moore, Hugo Haas. Producer di- 
rector Hugo Haas. Middle-aged widower marries show 
girl. She and her boy friend plot his murder. 84 mm. 
REVOLT AT FORT LARAMIE DeLuxe Color. John 
Dehner Diana Brewster. Producer Howard Koch. Di- 
rector Lesley Selander. Western. Civil War story of 
soldiers who are attacked by Indians. 73 mm. 

A pril 

BACHELOR PARTY. THE Don Murray, E. G. Marshall. 
Jack Warden. Producer Harold Hecht. Director Delbert 
Mann. Drama. From the famous television drama by 
Paddy Chayefsky. 

GIRL IN BLACK STOCKINGS. THE Lex Barker, Anne 
Bancroft, Mamie Van Doren. A Bel-Air Production. Di- 
rector Howard Koch. Drama. A series of sex slaymgs 
terrorize western resort. 

MONTE CARLO STORY. THE Technirama, Color. Mar- 
lene Dietrich, Vittorio De Sica. A Titanus Film. Sam 
Taylor director. Drama. A handsome Italian nobleman 
with a love for gambling marries a rich woman in 
order to pay his debts. 



2 



Film BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



May 



IIDDEN FEAR John Payne, Natalie Norwick. A St. 
.ubrey-Kohn Production. Director Andre de Toth. 
•r«nva. Police officer attempts to clear sister charged 



Coming 



AILOUT AT 43.000 John Payne. Karen Steele. A Pine- 
homas Production. Director Francis Lyon. U.S. Air 
orce pioneers bailout mechanism for jet pilots. 
IG CAPER. THE Rory CaJhound, Mary Costa. Pine- 
homas Production. Director Robert Stevens. Mulri- 
lillion dollar payroll robbery. 

:ARELESS YEARS, THE Natalie Trundy. Dean Stock- 
H Producer Edward Lewis. Director Arthur Hiller. 
RON SHERIFF. THE Sterling Hayden,, John Dehner, 
Constance Ford. Producer Jerome Robinson. Director 
idney Salkow. 

ONELY GUN, THE Anthony Ouinn, Katy Jurado. Pro- 

ucer Robert Jacks. Director Harry Horner. 

MONSTER THAT CHALLENGED THE WORLD, THE 

cience-fiction. Deals with a prehistoric sea monster. 
)UTLAW'S SON Dane Clark, Ben Cooper, Lori Nel- 
on. Bel Air Production. Director Lesley Selander. Gun- 
linger escapes from jail to save son from life of 

'HAROAH'S CURSE Ziva Shapir, Mark Dana. Producer 
Reward Koch. Director Lee Sholem. Horror. Repar- 
ation of mummies in Egyptian tombs, ti min. 2/18 
RIDE AND THE PASSION, THE VistaVision, Techni- 
otor. Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra, Sophia Loren. Pro- 
lucer-director Stanley Kramer. Drama. A Spanish 
luerrilla band marches an incredible distance with a 
000 pound cannon during Spanish War of Independ- 
nce of 1810. 

AVAGE PRINCESS Technicolor. Dilip Kumar, Nimmi. 
v Mehboob Production. Musical Drama. A princess 
alls in love with a peasant who contests her right 
o rule the kingdom. 101 min. 

TREET OF SINNERS George Montgomery, Geraldine 
rooks. Producer William Berke. Rookie policeman 
lashes with youthful criminals. 

iPRING REUNION Betty Hutton, Dana Andrews, Jean 
fagen. Director Robert Pirosh. Producer Jerry Bresler. 
Comedy. 7? min. 

HOOPER HOOK Joel McCrea, Barbara Stanwyck, Ed- 
ward Andrews. Producer Sol Fielding. Director Marquis 
Varren. A white woman, forced to live as an Indian 
Jhief's squaw, is finally rescued and tries to resume 
Ife with husband. 

2 ANGRY MEN Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb. Jack 
Varden. An Orion-Nova Production. Director Sidney 
.umet. Drama. Jury cannot agree on a verdict. 95 
nin. 3/4 



U N I VE RSAL-I NT' L 



December 



:URCU, BEAST OF THE AMAZON Eastman Color. John 
iromfleld, Beverly Garland. Producers Richard Kay, 
Harry Rybnick. Director Curt Siodmak. Horror. Young 
voman physician, plantation owner and his workers 
ire terrorized by mysterious jungle beast. 

5VERYTHING BUT THE TRUTH Technicolor. Tim Hovey, 
vtsureen O'Hara, John Forsythe. Producer Howard 
Christie. Director Jerry Hopper. Comedy. Young stu- 
ient gets mixed up with "lies". 83 min. 1 1/12. 
MIAN IN THE VAULT Anita Ekberg, Bill Campbell, 
(aren Sharpe. A Wayne-Fellows Production. Director 
Andrew McLaglen. Melodrama. A youna locksmith gets 
nvolved with a group engaged in illegal activities. 
'3 min. 1/7. 

40LE PEOPLE. THE John Agar, Cythia Patrick. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. Horror, 
scientific expedition in Asia discover strange men. 



January 



HAVE ONE, THE CieemaScope, Technicolor. Michel 
(ay, Fermin Rivera, Joy Lansing Rudolph Hoyos. P ro- 
tecer Frank k Maurice King. Director Irving Rapper. 
>rama. The adventures of a young Mexican boy who 
•rows up with a bull as his main companion and friend 
snd how each protests the other. 100 min. 10/15. 
BUNDLE OF JOY CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Debbie 
Uynolds, Eddi. Fisher, Adolph Menjou. Producer Ed- 
wind Grainger. Director Norman Tauro* Comedy, 
ion of department store magnet falls f* salesgirl. 
'8 min. 12/24. 

c OUR GIRLS IN TOWN CinemaScope, Technicolor. 
Seorge Nader, Julie Adams, Marianne Cook. Producer 
V Rosenberg. Director Jack Sher. Drama. Movie studio 
promotes world-wide talent hunt to find a new star. 
IS min. 12/10 

*OCK, PRETTY BABY Sal Mineo, John Saxon, Luana 
Patten. Producer Edmund Chevie. Director Richard 
sartlett. Musical. Rock n roll story of college combo. 
»9 min. ll/2o. 

WRITTEN ON THE WIND Technicolor. Rock Hudson, 
-auren Bacall, Robert Stack. Producer Albert Zug- 
;mith. Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Oil tycoon meets 
'iolent death because of jealousy for wife. 9? min. 10/1 



February 



SREAT MAN, THE Jose Ferrer, Mona Freeman, Dean 
Jagger. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jose Fer- 
'er. Drama. The life and death of a famous television 
dol. 92 min. 11/2*. 

ISTANBUL CinemaScope. Technicolor. Errol Hynn, Cor- 
nell Borchers. Producer Albert Cohen. Director Joseph 
Pevney. Adventure. Diamond smugglers in mysterious 
Turkey. 84 min. 1/21. 



NIGHT RUNNER. THE Ray Danlon, Cqlleen Miller. Pro- 
ducer Albert Cohen. Director Abner Biberman. Drama. 
Mental hospital inmate Is released while still in dan- 
gerous condition. 



March 



BATTLE HYMN Technicplor. CinemaScope. Rock Hud- 
son, Martha Hyer, Dan Duryea. Producer Ross Hunter. 
Director Douglas Sirk. Drama. Pilot redeems sense of 
guilt because of bombing of an orphanage by saving 
other orphans. 108 min. 12/24. 

GUN FOR A COWARD astman Color, CinemaScope. 
Fred MacMurrav, Jeffrey Hunter, Janice Rule. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Abnec Biberman. Wes- 
tern. Three brothers run a cattle ranch after death of 
their father. 88 min. 1/7. 

MISTER CORY Eastman Color. CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis. Martha Hyer, Charles Bickford. Producer 
Robert Arthur. Director Blake Edwards. Drama. Gam- 
bler from Chicago sjums climbs to wealth and re- 
spectability. 92 min. 1/21. 



A pril 



INCREDIBLE SHRINKING MAN, THE Grant Williams, 
Randy Stuart. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack 
Arnold. Science-fiction. The story of a man whose 
growth processes have accidently been reversed. 
81 min. 2/4. 

KELLY AND ME CinemaScope, Technicolor. Van John- 
son, Piper Laurie, Martha Hyer. Producer Robert Ar- 
thur. Director Robert Leonard. Drama. Story of dog- 
act in show business in the early I930*s. 2/4. 
TATTERED DRESS, THE CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, 
Jeannie Crain, Jack Carson. Producer Albert Zugsmith. 
Director Jack Arnold. Melodrama. Famous criminal 
lawyer gains humilitv when put on trial himself. 93 
min. 3/4 

Coming 

APPOINTMENT WITH A SHADOW CinemaScope. Tony 
Curtis, Marisa Pavan. Producer Robert Arthur. Director 
Joseph Pevney. Drama. Rookie cop seeks murderer of 
parish priest. 

DAY THEY GAVE BABIES AWAY. THE Eastman Color. 
Glynis Johns, Cameron Mitchell, Rex Thompson. Pro- 
ducer Sam Weisenthal. Director Allen Reisner. Drama. 
DEADLY MANTIS. THE Craig Stevens, Alix Talton. Pro- 
ducer William Alland. Director Jerry Juran. Horror. 
Monstrous creature threatens to destroy U.S. 
ESCAPADE IN JAPAN Color. Teresa Wright, Cameron 
Mitchell, Jon Provost, Roger Nakagaws. Producer-direc- 
tor Arthur Lubin. Search for two boys who start out 
in the wrong direction to find the very people who 
are trying to find them. 

GIRL MOST LIKELY, THE Eastmai Color. Jane Powell, 
Cliff Robertson Keith Andes. Producer Stanley Rublin. 
Director Mitchell Leisoe. Comedy. A girl is proposed 
to by three men on the same day. 

I MARRIED A WOMAN George Gobel, Diana Dors, 
Adolph Menjou. Producer William Bloom. Director Hal 
Kanter. Coemdy. Wife objects to taking secoed place 
to a beer advertising campaign with her husband. 
INTERLUDE Technicolor, CinemaScope. June Allyson, 
Rossano Brazii. Producer Ross Hunter. Director Douglas 
Sirk. American doctor falls in love with wife of fa- 
mous composer in Munich. 

JET PILOT Technicolor, SuperScope. John Wayne, 
Janet Leigh. Howard Hughes Production. Producer 
Jules Furth'man Director Josef von Sternberg. Drama. 
119 min. 

JOE BUTTERFLY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Audie 
Murphy, George Nader, Keenan Wynn. Producer 
Aaron Rosenberg. Director Jessie Hibbs. Story of 
American newsmen in Tokyo after Japanese surrender. 
JOE DAKOTA Color. Jock Mahoney, Luana Patten. Pro- 
ducer Howard Christie. Director Richard Bartlett. 
Drama. Stranger makes California oil town see the 
error of its ways. 

KETTLES ON OLD MocDONALD S FARM. THE Marjorie 
Main Parker Fennelly, Gloria Talbott. Producer Ho- 
ward Christie. Director Virgil Vogel. Comedy. The 
Kettles buy a new farm. 

LAND UNKNOWN, THE Jock Mahoney, Shawn Smith. 
Producer William Alland. Director Virgil Vogel. 
Science-fiction. Polar expedition finds Mesoioic age 
in Antartic expedition. 

MAN AFRAID CinemaScope. George Nader, Phyllis 
Thaxter, Tim Hovey. Producer Gordon Kay. Director 
Harry Keller. Father saves life of man attempting to 
murder his son. 

MAN OF A THOUSAND FACES CinemaScope. James 
Cagney, Dorothy Malone. Producer Robert Arthur. Di- 
rector Joseph Pevney. Drama. Life story of Lon Chaney. 
NIGHT PASSAGE Technirama. James Stewart. Audie 
Murphy, Dan Duryea. Producer A. Rosenberg. Director 
James Neilson. Drama. Payroll robbers are foiled by 
youngster and tough-fisted railroader. 
PAY THE DEVIL CinemaScope. Jeff Chandler, Orson 
Welles. Producer Albert Zugsmith. Director Jack Ar- 
nold. Drama. Sheriff destroys one-man domination of 
Texas town. 

PUBLIC PIGEON NO. 1 Eastman Color. Red Skelton, 
Vivian Blaine, Janet Blair. Producer Harry Tugend. Di- 
rector Norman McLeod. Comedy. A trusting soul 
tangles with slick con men and outwits them. 79 min. 
OUANTEZ CinemaScope, Eastman Color. Fred Mac- 
Murray, Dorothy Malone. Producer Gordon Kay. Direc- 
tor Harry Keller. Drama. A study of five people in- 
volved in a robbery and killing. 

RUN OF THE ARROW Eastman Color. Rod Steiger, 
Sarita Montiel, Ralph Meeker. Producer-director Sam 
Fuller. Adventure. Young sharpshooter joins Sioux 
Indians at close of Civil War. 

TAMMY CinemaScope, Technicolor. Debbie Reynolds, 
Leslie Nielson. Producer Aaron Rosenberg. Director 
Joe Pevney. Story of a young girl, her grandfather and 
a young man who falls in love with her. 89 min. 



THAT NIGHT John Beal. Augusta Dabney, Shepperd 
Strudwick. Producer Hiram Brown. Dfrector John 
Newland. Drama. A tragedy almost shatters a IS- 
year-old marriage. 

UNHOLY WIFE. THE Oolor. Diana Dors, *od Steiger, 
Marie Windsor. Producer-director John Farrow. Drama. 
A wife sunningly plots the death of her husband who 
she has betrayed. 

VIOLATORS, THE Arthur OConnell. Nancy Malone. 
Producer H. Brown. Director John Newland. Drama. 
Story of a probation officer in the New York City 
courts. 

YOUNG STRANGER, THE James MacArthur. Kim Hun- 
ter. Producer Stuart Miller. Director John Frankeo- 
heimer. Drama. Son seeks to earn affection from his 
parents. 84 min. 2/18. 



November 

GIANT WarnerColor. Elizabeth Taylor. Rock Hudson, 
James Dean. Producer-director George Stevens Drama. 
Based on the famous novel by Edna Ferber. The story 
of oil cattle and love in the Southwest during WWII. 
201 min. 10/15. 

GIRL HE LEFT BEHIND, THE Tab Hunter, Natalie 
Wood. Producer Frank Rosenberg. Director David 
Butler Drama. Army turns immature boy into man. 
103 min. 10/29. 

December 

BABY DOLL Karl Maiden, Carroll Baker. Eli Wallach. 
A Newton Production. Producer-director El la Kazan. 
Drama Story of ■> gin-mill proprietor and a beautiful 
girl. I 14 min. 12/24. 

January 

WRONG MAN, THE Henry Fonda, Vera Miles, Anthony 
Quayles. Producer-director Alfred Hitchcock. Drama. 
Bass fiddle player at Stork Club is r - " - " 
murder case. 105 min. 1/7. 



jspect in 



February 



BIG LAND, THE WarnerColor. Alan Ladd, Virginia 
Mayo. A Jaguar Production. Director Gordon Douglas. 
Western. Cattlemen fight to move theer herds to 
distant railroads. 93 min. 2/4. 

TOP SECRET AFFAIR Kirk Douglas. Susan Hayward. 
Producer Martin Rackin. Director H. C. Potter. Come- 
dy. A lovery lady calls the bluff of an Army General. 
93 min. 2/4. 

March 

PARIS DOES STRANGE THINGS Technicolor Ingrid 
Bergman, Mel Ferrer, Jean Marais. A Franco-London 
Rim. Director Jean Renoir. Drama. Tale of the exiled 

widow of a Polish Prince. 86 min. 3/4. 



April 



COUNTERFEIT PLAN, THE Zachary Scott. Peggie 
Castle Producer Alec Snowden. Director Montgomery 
Tully. Drama. Inside story of one of the largest for- 
gery operations ever attempted. 

SPIRIT OP ST. LOUIS. THE CinemaScope. Warner- 
Color. James Stewart, Rena Clark. Producer Leland 
Hayward. Director lilly Wilder. Drama. The story of 
the first man ever to cross the Atlan* : - 

138 min. 3/4. 



a plane. 



Coming 



A FACE IN THE CROWD Andy Griffith. Patricia Neal. 
Producer-director Ella Kazan. Drama. 
LAFAYETTE ESCA0RILLE CinemaScope. WarnerColor. 
Tab Hunter, Etchlka Choureau. J. Carrol Naish. Drama. 
PRINCE AND THE SHOWGIRL. THE Coloiv Marilyn 
Monroe, Laurence Olivier, Dame Sybil Thorndyke. 
Prodi/eer-director Laurence Olivier. Comedy. 
UNTAMED YOUTH Mamie Van Doren. Lou Nelson, John 
Russell. 



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BULLETIN — THIS IS YOUR PRODUCT 



WnANULEK HAS UNI Ur I HE DE9 

ROLES OF HIS CAREER! .? da, ly 






'Attractive lure for the ticket buyers! Superior! 
A memorable film!" -HOLLYWOOD REPORTER 

Compelling, actionful drama! Many angles of 
appeal \" — SHOWMEN'S TRADE REVIEW 

Emotion packed l"-M. P. EXHIBITOR 

'A trio of top boxoffice draws! Should have 
exploitation and boxoffice appeal!" -FILM DAILY 

'Fast moving, holding one's interest throughout!" 

-HARRISON'S REPORTS 



co-starring 



JOANNE DRU JULIE LONDON. 



DONALD CRISP -JOHN LUPTON 



and introducing 



DMJAI ft UnU/ADIl MUS ' C by ELMER bernstein • Directed by HALL BARTLETT and JULES BRICKEN • Written and Produced by HALL BARTLETT 
nUNALU nUlYANU Executive Producer MEYER MISHKIN • A HALL BARTLETT Production 



4l 

BULLETIN 



cop)' 



Revie 



The Movie Audience 
ttasn V Vanished — 
They 9 re at Home! 

♦ 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE VI 



CHANGING LEISURE HABITS 



lewpoints 

RIL I. 1957 * VOLUME 25, NO. 7 



Vow ntl I 
The m Lvsi m 
Audience 

While we contemplate the decline 
in regular movie attendance and 
plaintively wcnder what has hap- 
pened to our audience, l2t's scan the 
report issued by Sindlinger & Com- 
pany on the nation's February "at- 
home" pursuits. 

During that month a record stay- 
in activity was established, based on 
reports from 30,000 interviews. New 
highs were recorded in television 
viewing, radio listening and in read- 
ing. "During the average day in 
February," Sindlinger reports, "as 
our field staff of 186 interviewed 
mere than 1000 people every day, 
we found better than 90% of the 
population 'at home' on our first 
call." 

Prominent among the at-home ac- 
tivities was "talking" interest in 
movies, the report finding that 
"dai'y talk about movies at theatres 
was high for a mid-winter month, 
with 31 million talking about 
movies." This compares with a re- 
ported 59 million talking about TV 
shows — hardly an unfavorable com- 
mentary for the movies in view of 
the comparable number of television 
viewers and moviegoers. 

What Sindlinger makes clear is 
the fact that the audience of po- 
tential moviegoers is not "lost" — 
they're at home. The occasional 
outstanding picture apparently is 
not enough to counteract the home 
lures of TV, radio and reading. 
What has set in on a large section 
of the public is a plain apathy to- 
ward going out to the movies, and 
this is being further fostered by the 
feast of fine old films that are being 
fed through the air channels. 

These findings dramatically point 
up the most basic problem our in- 
dustry faces — how to get people out 
of the home. The task is to trans- 



late the "talked about" into the "go 
cut to" the movies. At least as im- 
portant as the exploitation of indi- 
vidual pictures is the selling of 
movie-going as a desirable social 
practice. We must recognize that 
the human being is a creature of 
habit and strive to direct his recre- 
ational tendencies toward the movie 
theatre. 

This calls for a mammoth nation- 
al promotion of the psychological 
benefits of going out to the movies. 
This kind of primary institutionaliz- 
ing has been bruited about the in- 
dustry for the past year or so, but 
thus far has not been activated into 
a persistent, productive drive. It is 
a job of reaching out to bestir the 
people, to coax them out of the 
home and into the theatre. Lacking 
such a campaign, it is likely that our 
audience will continue to shrink. 
This kind of promotion requires big 
thinking, persistent action. Dees cur 
industry have the leadership to ex- 
ecute it? 

Shotriny 
A Profit 

The Wall Street Journal has pub- 
lished its annual compilation of the 
comparative profits in various Amer- 
ican industries for 1956 and 1955. 
Among the categories included is 
one labeled "movies and movie the- 
atres," covering seven companies. 

Obviously this is by no means a 
complete picture of the industry, but 



BULLETIN 



Film BULLETIN: Motion Picture Trade Paper 
published every other Monday by Wax Publi- 
cations, Inc. Mo Wax, Editor and Publisher. 
PUBLICATION-EDITORIAL OFFICES: 1239 Vine 
Street, Philadelphia 7, Pa., LOcust 8-0950, 0951. 
Philip R. Ward, Associate Editor- Leonard 
Coulter, New York Associate Editor; Duncan G. 
Steck, Business Manager; Marvin Schiller, 
Publication Manager; Robert Heath, Circulation 
Manager. BUSINESS OFFICE: 522 Fifth Avenue, 
New York 36, N. Y., MUrray Hill 2-3631; 
Alt Dinhofer, Editorial Representative. 
Subscription Rates: ONE YEAR, S3. 00 
in the U. S.; Canada, S4.00; Europe, 
$5.00. TWO YEARS: S5.00 in the 
U. S.; Canada, $7.50; Europe, $9.00. 



we w r ll assume that it is representa- 
tive since it comes from a pubiica- 
tion with no particular :xe to grind. 

The Wali Street Jcurna.'s tabula- 
tion shows that the movie industry 
profit picture reflected a 2.7% rise. 
This compares with a ris2 of 40.4% 
for tools and machinery, 6.5% f.r 
tobacco companies, 23.7% fcr print- 
ing and publishing, 30.2% fcr drug 
companies, 33.1% for grocery chain 
retailers. On the ether hand, auto- 
mobiles were off 34.6%, airlines 
were off 1.3%, chemicals were off 
5.8%, electrical equipment was off 
3.3%, radio and television were off 
23.3%, textiles were off 16.6%, rail- 
roads off 2.8%. The total for the 
750 firms covered in the Journal's 
tabulation was a rise of .1%. 

On the basis of these figures, the 
motion picture industry does not 
appear to have done badly. It sur- 
passes the average, but in all fair- 
ness, we must realize that the 34.6% 
decline in the earnings of automo- 
bile companies and the 23.3% de- 
cline in radio and television dragged 
down what otherwise might have 
been a higher general rate cf in- 
crease. 

The broad picture of the industry 
which is presented in the tabula- 
tion, however, is not a sickly one. 
Considering the severely constricted 
film output, it is remarkable that the 
industry is as healthy as the Journal 
reports it. 

Untlerstand 
The Audience 

We are indebted to Dr. Henry 
David, Professor of Economics at 
Columbia University and Executive 
Director of the National Manpower 
Council, for the information he of- 
fered in a recent CBS Radio broad- 
cast. Dr. David was offering high- 
lights from the Council's recent 
report to President Eisenhower on 
"The Womanpower of the Nation." 



Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 Page 3 



all new.' 

GREATEST 
OF ALL! 

FIRST TIME 

IM COLOR! 





ft fi 




s;a '"" g ffiwffi m** ROBERT BEATTY • YOLANDE DUNLAN BETTA ST JOHN ■ WILFRID HYDE WHITE 



saeen Pte, r,v MONTGOMERY POTMAN a* ULUE HAYWARD technicolor- -,k?;^,.eogar rice b 
JOHN CROYDON A Sol Lesser Production * 



Above: The 24-sheet is perfect for cut-out uses in lobby or on marquee 

The greatest attraction of its kind ever made. Tarzan, 
a magic word for tlie millions, comes to tlie public 
now for tlie first time in color. With an entirely 
NEW, streamlined, up-to-the-minute story, in a mag- 
nificent production, it is an entertainment of stature 
for class-appeal as well as mass-patronized theatres. 




M-G-M presents "TARZ AN AND THE LOST SAFARI" starring Gordon Scott as the New Tarzan • co-starring Robert Beatty • Yolande Don I 
Betta St. John • Wilfrid Hyde White • Screenplay by Montgomery Pittman and Lillie Hayward • Technicolor*' - Based on the characi 
created by Edgar Rice Burroughs • Directed by Bruce Humberstone • Produced by John Croydon • A Sol Lesser Production • An M-G-M Rehi 



JAILER IMPACT. A cogent addenda to the long es- 
)lished power of the trailer as a movie selling medium — 
lich exhibitors have long realized — is the recent Sind- 
ger report showing that over 35 per cent of the movie- 
ing audience queried during a 19-weeks period said they 
:re directly influenced to attend by seeing the trailer on 
previous visit. According to the report, this marks the 
jhest rate of "trailer influence" yet measured by this re- 
ble analyst organization. Especially in view of the re- 
ubtable drawing power of the theatre trailer, some the- 
remen wonder why wider use of trailers is not being 
ade on television. This doesn't refer to the so-called tel- 
i or 15-second spot, or even to the clips which occasion- 
it to a full-fledged two- to three-minute trailer with 
[y receive TV breaks like those on Ed Sullivan's show, 
enes and compelling copy, just as it is shown on the the- 
re screen. Cost, obviously, is a factor to be reckoned, 
id there are other problems such as obtaining effective 
acement and time. But when one considers the potent 
id proven impact the trailer continues to exert on movie- 
ring, it is certainly worth consideration in view of the 
illions of people reached with TV. If a trailer can get 
>% of the theatre audience to pay a return visit, it is not 
treasonable to assume that it might attract five to ten 
3rcent of the TV audience who would see it. This would 
e a means of reaching into the home to pluck its audience 
at of the living room, thus attacking the very root of the 
tovie attendance decline. The logic is, after all, plain: the 
npact of the theatre trailer is proven. The TV screen is 
le only mass outlet outside of the theatre for use of the 
•ailer. Why not, then, the TV screen for the theatre 
ailer? 

0 

HOWMAN TODD. The satisfaction enjoyed by Mike 
'odd in winning the "best picture" Academy Award for 
is "Around the World in 80 Days" was shared to a lesser 
egree, no doubt) by quite a few industryites. Mike never 
ttracted the attention his showmanship deserved from 
ne film industry, and more than a few Hollywood people 
-It that the film companies were passing up a potential 
roduction great. Now that his "80 Days" has established 
is movie know-how, don't be surprised if one of the 
lajor studios ties him up. He has more showmanship in 
is pinky than some of the so-called "geniuses" in filmland 
ave in their very large heads. 

0 

:HE 'OSCAR' PARADE. Once again, the Academy 
Awards TV show failed to satisfy industryites who con- 
end that the right and proper business of the "Oscar" 
hew is Entertainment. It seems that those who stage 
ncviedom's annual Un-spectacular for untold video mil- 
ions have set their minds to other ends. They struggle 



H/kft They'te hiking About 

□ □ □ In the Movie Business □ □ □ 



for a kind of dignity and a pomp and ceremony within 
which to frame the presentation of the coveted Oscars. 
Only occasionally do they appear troubled by their obliga- 
tion to provide a good shw. In this direction, they have 
impounded a low genre of theatricality which would do 
little justice to television's own morning breakfast clubs. 
Only through the vast power of the Academy show's dra- 
matis personae, the personalities who introduce and are 
themselves introduced, does the 90-minute presentation 
escape the curse of unrelieved ennui. Without the unan- 
ticipated glimmer of a Liz Taylor neckline, the breathless 
stammerings of other film lovelies, the glabrous magne- 
tism of a Yul Brynner, the show has qualities of a summer 
replacement offering. Jerry Lewis is clearly not one to 
monitor moviedom's one bright annual opportunity to en- 
shrine the opulence and glamor and eloquence of Holly- 
wood. A defter hand is required. However, it is gener- 
ally admitted that several elements did prove worthwhile. 
The presentations moved faster ; commercials did not in- 
trude as bluntly on the text of the show as in bygone 
years; and, thankfully, the spokesmen practiced notable 
restraint before the microphone. But in the main, the 
Academy show received, and rightfully merits, a damning 
with faint praise. It behooves those entrusted with next 
year's program to determine whether they want fish or 
fowl, entertainment or solemn proceedings. When it 
dawns that entertainment is the proper article, let them 
then work it so that the Academy Awards show might 
itself become a contender for an Emmy award as one of 
TV's sprightliest entertainments of the season. 

<0 

UA PERSONNEL. Insiders assert with certainty that 
one of the United Artists executives will step out shortly 
after the public stock issue is finalized. This member of 
the "miracle" group that lifted the faded UA back among 
the industry leaders reportedly will go into independent 
production (with UA releasing, no doubt). 

0 

'DOLL' OK NOW. After viewing some of the raw sex 
dispensed in Warner Bros. "Untamed Youth," the opinion 
was advanced by one spectator that the Legion of De- 
cency would probably change its mind about "Baby Doll" 
and give that "condemned" film an "A" rating. "This 
one," the gentleman declared, "makes 'Baby Doll' seem 
like charming fare for showing at a reunion of the 
Brownies." 



Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 Page 5 



"The Deadly Mantis" 

Mildly engrossing science-fiction horror entry. Exaggeration, 
may draw ridicule. Requires heavy ballyhoo. 

Universal-International offers another science-fiction 
melodrama, but this one may raise more laughs than 
chills. Produced by William Alland (credited with "It 
Came from Outer Space" and "Creature from the Black 
Lagoon") "The Deadly Mantis" is strictly for patrons of 
the fantastic, meaning the action-ballyhoo houses. Martin 
Berkeley's screenplay has fighter planes battling a 50-foot 
deadly insect, but he takes much too long in getting down 
to the exciting phase of his plot. Too much footage before 
that is devoted to pseudo-scientific technical humbug, and 
the interest of many spectators is apt to wander. Director 
Nathan Juran manages to maintain fair pace and mild 
suspense as the giant mantis is released in the Arctic and 
moves to warmer climate. The photography, employing 
stock scenes of the polar areas and some good tricks, is 
above average. William Hopper, prehistoric-animal spe- 
cialist, is summoned by the Air Force when northern 
radar outposts are mysteriously destroyed. An 8-foot, 
claw-like object is found, which Hopper deduces is part of 
a giant insect preserved for centuries in ice, and still alive. 
He goes to the polar A.F. station with magazine editor, 
Miss Talton, and meets colonel Stevens who helps them 
learn the mantis is traveling to the tropics. Jet planes 
fight the insect over Washington, D. C, and it falls 
wounded in a tunnel beneath New York's Hudson River. 
Stevens and his crew make their way into the tunnel and 
destroy the deadly mantis with poison gas. 



"The Counterfeit Plan" 

Average crime meller made in England. Zachary Scoff fair 
for marquee. Satisfactory dualler for action, bally houses. 

This fairly suspenseful crime meller was made in Eng- 
land and is released by Warner Brothers. It follows for- 
mula lines of gangster stuff, with no attempt to get into 
the characters. Action houses should find it an adequate 
dualler. Zachary Scott and Peggie Castle head the other- 
wise British cast and give the offering a modicum of mar- 
quee strength. Montgomery Tully's direction has good 
pace and is quite convincing in depicting the details of 
counterfeiting. Screenplay by James Eastwood is only 
so-so. Convicted murderer Zachary Scott escapes 
from France to England, where he hunts up his old friend, 
Mervyn Johns, one-time forger now going straight. On 
threat of exposure, Scott forces Johns to aid him in a 
counterfeiting plan. Johns' daughter, Peggie Castle, is 
also forced to aid Scott and his gang. The money is 
printed in Johns' home and the distribution plan set up, 
but Johns tips off police in fear of his daughter's life. 
When their plan is foiled, Scott kills Johns. But in try- 
ing to escape, Scott and an accomplice plunge over a 
cliff in their car and die. 



"Untamed Youth" 

Exploitation programmer has iiftle substance, much that 
censerable. Mamie Van Doren, roclt 'rs roll for ballyhoo. 

This Aubrey Schenck production for Warner Brother; 
is a shoddy, hodge-podge that capitalizes on just aboui 
every current youth gimmick — delinquency, rock 'n' rol 
and calypso. It has its share of exploitable elements, in- 
cluding Mamie Van Doren, but her almost-lewd gyrations 
and other vulgar aspects of the film should make exhibi- 
tors think twice before booking it. The production it 
rather crude in every department. Using location shots 
throughout, director Howard W. Koch provided a fail 
pace, but the screenplay by John C. Higgins is vague, im- 
plausible and unpleasant. The cast, mostly young people 
hardly has a redeeming feature in the entire lot. Miss Var 
Doren and Lori Nelson are caught swimming in off-limits 
property and are sentenced to a work farm for delinquents 
by Judge Lurene Tuttle. The girls discover conditions on 
the farm are bad and that boss John Russell is not to be, 
trusted. When another prisoner collapses and dies for lack 
of nroper medical care, farm hand Don Burnett, sen of the 
lady judge, learns that she is secretly married to Russell 
and has been supplying him cheap prison labor. Con- 
science-stricken, Judge Tuttle nabs her husband about to 
smuggle Mexican labor into the farm illegally, arrests him 
and frees the prisoners. Nelson gets Burnett, Van Doren 
gets TV stardom. 

Warner Brothers. 80 minutes, 
duced by Aubrey Schenck. Dii 

"War Drums" 

Standard western fare as duaSSer for action houses. DeLuxo 
co!or plus factor. Wea'i marquee. 

This is a routine western, complete with all the ingredi- 
ents usually associated with a film of this type — Indians, 
good white men, bad white men and a pretty half-breed 
girl. A United Artists release, via the Bel-Air production 
stable, it shapes up as an adequate dualler for the action 
market. Plus factors include quite a few rip-roaring action 
scenes, a dash of sex and DeLuxe Color photography. 
However, the stock characters, a weak marquee and un- 
evenness of story line tend to detract from these assets. 
Reginald Le Borg's direction is adequate. Apache chief 
Barker marries a Mexican half-breed (Joan Taylor), cap- 
tured during a raid on some horse thieves, despite the 
offer of a frontiersman-friend (Ben Johnson) to buy her 
and the protests from fellow redskins. She becomes a 
combination warrior-wife. When some unscrupulous 
prospectors stir up trouble, the Indians massacre them, 
spreading terror throughout the Southwest. Barker, seri- 
ously wounded, is taken to a small settlement by his men, 
is treated by the local doctor, promises to harm no one if 
healed. Johnson, now a Union officer, surrounds the town 
with his troops and enters under a flag of truce. He lets 
the Apache fighter and his wife return to their mountain 
hideaway, hopeful of peace at a later date. 



•ner Brothers. 80 minutes. Zachary Scott, Peggie Castle 
ed by Alec C. Snowden. Directed by Montgomery Tully, 



Mervyn Johns. Pro- 



United 
Johnson 
LeBorg. 



ists IA Bel-Air Pro< 
Produced by Aube 



minutes. Lex Barker, Joan Taylor, 
Howard Koch- Directed by Reginald 



Page 6 Film BULLETIN April I, |?57 



lOVIEDOM'S TOO-FREE ENTERPRISE. No more 
hostly presentiment can creep into a cinema mogul's 
reams than the thought of amalgamation with the hated 
ompetitor. 

Just why the idea of entering into a profitable business 
ombination should hold such terrors for him is hard to 
ee, for it is accepted practice in almost every other sphere 
.f economic endeavor when special circumstances dictate. 
J erhaps the answer lies hidden somewhere in the dark 
rannies of the moviedom psyche : wherein exists an obdu- 
ate refusal to submerge one's personality at any price. 
3 erhaps it has no psychoanalytic roots at all. Maybe you 
:an chalk it up to sheer ignorance of one of the more 
:ivilized refinements of high big business. 

Whatever the answer, the special circumstances de- 
nanding greater industrial centralization are at hand. Our 
Ijreat film producing complex currently consists of seven 
i najor (or near major) movie companies followed by a 
: spiral nebulea of "one-man shops" equipped to grind out, 
at best, two features per year, normally one picture a year, 
land in a generous number of cases, no pictures a year. 
Moviedom is thus beset with the paradox of housing more 
manufacturers producing less finished goods than any in- 
dustry this side of the USSR. The economic waste en- 
gendered thereby is staggering. The ultimate abomination, 
if this course pursues its ad infinitum, is foreseeable — that 
day when film exhibitors wake up to find themselves out- 
numbered by film producers! 

O 

The overpopulation in film production stands indicted 
of waste on several elementary grounds: (a) it forces 
costly duplication in the manufacturing and the marketing 
processes; (b) it deprives the best equipped companies of 
the prime resources of production, key talent, thus raising 
their unit costs all around; (c) it fails, despite the multi- 
plicity of competition, to lower the cost of finished goods ; 
(d) it fails, despite the multiplicity of creative achieve- 
ment, to elevate the quality standards of finished goods. 

Quite clearly these charges are directed at the talented 
refugees from the major studios, who, overcome by some 
sort of free enterprise mania, have struck out to open their 
own stores. It is no knock at the spirit of Adam Smith to 
say that his ideal of a pure, untrammeled laissez faire so- 
ciety is a fine thing if not abused. However, many Holly- 
wood's glamourfaces not only abuse the Smithian doc- 
trine, they make a sham of it For theirs is not the purpose 
of contributing to the pool of economic good, it is to run 
from the tax collector. They have not added to competi- 
tion; they have complicated it. Of course, there are ex- 
ceptions, but in the main, the stars will serve themselves 
and their industry better by calling the mass hegira to an 
end and return to the places from whence they came. 

There are simply too many individual islands of produc- 
tion, each burdened with its own overhead, each compet- 
ing with the others for the things required for moviemak- 
ing. And, mark you, each ultimately is subject to the dic- 
tates of the few companies with facilities for international 



FINANCIAL 

BULLETIN 

APRIL I , 1957 



By Philip R. Ward 

distribution. The actors and actresses, the producers and 
directors who have forsaken the established studios in 
quest of freedom (and capital gains) would do well to 
start thinking in businesslike terms of pooling their talents 
for economic reasons. Exhibition no longer can afford to 
support all these isolated, cost-compounding production 
units. 

The truth beneath all this scattered shooting is that the 
men who run the big film studios have allowed control of 
the business to slip away from them into the hands of ar- 
tists who lack the acumen to manage their operations 
wisely. A great need exists for smart business men to put 
moviemaking back on a business basis. 

0 0 

BULLISH TIDINGS ON 20TH-FOX from the invest- 
ment firm of Herzfeld & Stearns. Reports a recent bulletin: 

"We believe the stock of this leading producer and dis- 
tributor of motion pictures to be undervalued for the fol- 
lowing reasons : 

1. "Revenues from film rentals during 1957 are expected 
to show an increase of approximately 20% from the $103 
million realized in 1956. 

2. "Per share earnings for 1957 should approximate 
$3.00 versus an estimated $2.40 for the past year. First 
quarter results will register a sharp gain from the 17 cents 
of 1956 to between 50 and 75 cents this year. 

3. "The terms of the deal made for the television rights 
of Twentieth Century-Fox pre-1948 feature films insures 
the company a minimum of $1.10 per share in earnings for 
the next five years from this source. Looking beyond that 
period the possibility exists for a similar deal covering 
post-1948 pictures. 

4. "Indications are that oil revenues from the company's 
studio property while not significant at present, could be- 
come important in two to three years. 

5. "The present 7% yield is generous, with the possibili- 
ty of a hike in the current rate as the predicted earnings 
improvement materializes. 

6. "Management is presently investigating the possibili- 
ty of additional savings in operating costs through : 

a. Merging of studio facilities with another major film 
producer, and 

b. Disposal of the valuable studio property. 

7. "We understand that a program to reduce the capital- 
ization through purchase of stock, may follow as a result 
of the last mentioned step. This would benefit the remain- 
ing outstanding shares and give market support to the 
stock." 



Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 Page 7 



NUMBER 



26 



TION NEWS 



IN A SERIES OF IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENTS 



SOON TO GO 
INTO PRODUCTION 




with 
the 

industry's 
biggest 
talents . . . 

BOB 
HOPE 



TROUBLE IN PARIS 



Co-starring Fernandel • Anita Ekberg • Martha Hyer • Technirama 



Technicolor" • Directed by Gerd Oswald • A Tolda Production 



PATTERNS OF PATRONAGE 

VI 



CxctuM* $L BULLETIN Jeature 



Changing Leisure Habits 



By LEONARD SPINRAD 

An aging motion picture actress insisted that the 
:ameraman who had photographed her great triumphs a 
lozen years before be assigned to her new picture. When 
;he looked at the rushes she was aghast. She said to the 
:ameraman, "I am shocked. You made me look so lovely 
n my other pictures; but now you have made me look 
jgly and old. How could you do this to me?" 

The cameraman hesitated for a moment, and then re- 
Dlied, "I'm sorry, but you must remember that I'm much 
Dlder now." 

The movies themselves are much older now. This is not 
as painful a subject as the geriatrics of glamor girls, but it 
s an important fact to be considered in examining the 
changing leisure habits of the customer. The movies have 
been changing too. 



INDUSTRIES CHANGE WITH TIME 



In a constantly growing economy like the dynamic 
United States, change has been the rule for every great in- 
dustry — transportation, fuel, food, clothing and the non- 
essentials alike. Some industries evolve faster than others. 
Within the lifetime of the motion picture business, the 
municipal transportation picture has gone through several 
complete revolutions, for example, from the horse car to 
the trolley to the motor bus. Meanwhile, the movies have 
been running with the tide. 

The movies in their proper historical context have had 
three lives and are embarked upon a fourth — all this in 
less than the life expectancy of the average man. Nor does 
the present status of theatre motion pictures suggest any 
imminent demise. 



The customers for the infant motion pictures of more 
than half a century ago were not apt to be the best people 
in town. The subjects of the "flickers" were a bit primi- 
tive, so were the exhibition conditions and so, particularly 
in big cities, were the patrons. The manager of the local 
variety theatre cr the opera house had no reason to worry 
about celluloid opposition. 



MOVIES BUILT THEIR OWN PUBLIC 



Then the first silent feature pictures came along and the 
movies became big business. They attracted more people 
and better people, and housed them in specially built thea- 
tres that set new standards of comfort and satisfactory 
viewing. Because they did not yet talk, movies grew with- 
out really biting into the legitimate stage, the vaudeville 
houses and the like. Instead, motion pictures buiit a pub- 
lic of their own — the first really huge mass entertainment 
audience in America. 

Not even radio was able to stop the onward march of 
motion pictures. When finally talking pictures and color 
were introduced, the movies were in a class alone. They 
wrote finis to the vaudeville theatre, reduced the legitimate 
stage to a fragment, however influential a fragment, of its 
former self, and dominated the entertainment scene like a 
colossus. 

Everybody went to the movies. It was the motion pic- 
ture theatre which offered the most elaborate, the most 
comolete, the cheapest and the most easily viewed enjoy- 
ment. If you wanted to see and hear, and maybe spoon 
with your best p"irl or help your wife keep an eye on the 
kids, the movie theatre was the place. You could listen to 

(Continued on Page 10) 




Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 Page 9 



PATTERNS QF PATRONAGE 



Post m II sir Advent of Monte Entertainment 



(Continued from Page 0) 

the radio or read a book at home, but that was only partial 
entertainment. The movies were the complete show. 

Technology doesn't stand still at any time. It certainly 
didn't wait long to smash the motion picture monopoly on 
sight-and-sound pleasure. (This year is the 30th anniver- 
sary of the first talking feature picture — one short gener- 
ation.) Television, home building do-it-yourself, hobbies, 
travel, even one-sense pursuits like high-fidelity phono- 
graphs and tape recorders all came along to bid for some 
of the attention previous'y devoted to the movies. The 
movies once again were confronted with strong compe- 
tition; and that is where they are today, competing for 
many of the customers they once felt they owned outright. 

The American consumer has had an evolution of his 
own, with his personal ups and downs, which has run par- 
allel to that of the movies. When motion pictures first 
came upon the scene, the consumer had precious little lei- 
sure time and even less leisure money. He worked a six- 
day week of 10 hours or more ner day, and when he came 
home he usually stayed home. The house had no elec- 
tricity and few of what we have come to regard as the 
necessary comforts. America was in the throes of a wave 
of immigration, with serious minded newcomers spending 
their spare time studying how better to integrate them- 
selves in a brand new world. (Some of them became pio- 
neers of the movies.) 

Then the working hours grew shorter, the pay checks 
larger, the horizons wider. Simultaneously the movies 
grew better. It was a meeting of two vibrant American 
phenomena, the masses with time to devote to entertain- 
ment and the medium which put entertainment on a mass 
basis. 



WHEN EVERYBODY WENT 



In the roaring pre-depression twenties, the movies added 
another vital ingredient for the moviegoers. Talking pic- 
tures were the answer to radio and the stage. They com- 
pleted the triumph of movies as the universal American 
entertainment. Not even the depression could put a per- 
manent crimp in the status of the movies as the sole place 
where Americans anxious to be entertained could find rela- 
tively cheap and incomparably complete entertainment. 
The jobless went to the movies when they could afford to 
go no place else. Those with jobs went to the movies to 
relax. Everybody went to the movies. 

During World War II the pattern was maintained. 
Everybody went to the movies. Even front line troops 
were serviced with the latest Hollywood product in 16mm 
portable editions. Films were encouraged as a morale wea- 
pon. No other form of communications provided as graph- 
ic a picture of the war, or as satisfying a momentary es- 
cape from it. The movies were attended by Americans in 
all walks of life. There just wasn't any competition to 
speak of. 

Came the peace, and things were different. The working 
man's working hours were reduced, his pay increased, his 



highways extended. He got married and began raising a 
family, mowing the lawn, taking a winter vacation, per- 
haps in addition to a summer one. And he bought a tele- 
vision set. On two fronts, he was no longer dependent on 
the movies. He could relax by watching movies and other 
programs at home via video, or he could relax by doing a 
dozen different things inside or outside the home, none of 
which had amounted to much before the war. 

It was after World War II that technology really kicked 
motion pictures in the pants. Television, do-it-yourself 
materials, building booms, sky-rocketing birth rates 
(which don't deserve to be classified a technology but cer- 
tainly created a market for it) — all these things took care 
of the idle hours with no need ever to visit a box office. 



THE SUPERMARKET ARRIVES 



The general American business community responded to 
the new conditions. While the drive-in was bringing a pro- 
found change to American theatregoing, the shopping 
center was doing the same for retail trade. Beginning at 
the supermarket, the American husband began to take a 
more active part in activities he had once considered pure- 
ly woman's work. The concept of togetherness was artfully 
exploited by the shopping center, particularly with the re- 
vision of operating hours better to suit the leisure eve- 
ning convenience of the man of the house, and of a greater 
number of working wives as well. 

That brings us to the specific. How then have the lei- 
sure habits of the customer changed, and what are the im- 
plications for the future? 

Some statistical information helps to draw a bead on 
the elusive patron. Racetrack betting was up 7.1% and 
racetrack attendance rose by 3.2% in 1956, compared to 
1955, according to the United Press. Domestic pleasure 
travel as far back as 1953 had achieved an annual rate of 
$8,000,000, compared to only $5,400,000,000 six years be- 
fore. Toys, books, dining out, boats, television of course, 
do-it-yourself and, most notably, foreign travel all in- 
creased by wide margins in the same span of years. Only 
motion pictures and spectator sports (other than horse- 
racing) showed a volume drop. 

People have more money today; people are spending 
more money today. But how do they spend it. There has 
been indication lately that the biggest market for motion 
picture theatres is among the middle and lesser middle 
ciass, not the upper class. Well, the Wharton School of 
Finance and Commerce of the University of Pennsylvania 
last year, in a study reported by Business Week, indicated 
that the higher the income the higher the percentage that 
people spend on recreation. Those netting $10,000 a year 
and over, for example, were said to spend 7.9% on recrea- 
tion, while those earning $5-6,000 spend only 6.3%. (These 
figures refer to income after taxes.) 

In other words, as the earning power of the average 
American rises, he is apt to have an even greater rise in 
the amount he spends for recreation, but he is not apt, ac- 
cording to the best observation of the motion picture in- 



Page 10 Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 



PATTERNS DF PATRONAGE 



imaing-Out is a Treat far tin* Houscm-ifi* 



dusty, to be spending more at the movies. He takes a trip 
abroad, he becomes a hi-fi bug or a gardening enthusiast 
in his new suburban home. As he spends more money on 
these new activities, he is, so to speak, weaned away from 
his first recreational spending, the movies. 



POPULATION UP. ATTENDANCE DOWN 



Some of the record attendance undoubtedly traces to the 
tremendous expansion of our population in the post-war 
decade. But it is worth noting that if an increase in at- 
tendance is a natural concomitant of the expanding popu- 
lation the motion picture theatre patronage figures have 
disquieting implications. If attendance figures had been 
steady while the gross population rose, this would of itself 
have represented a worrisome decline in percentage of cus- 
tomers; but when the attendance has gone down while 
total population went up, the decline must be regarded 
even more seriously. 

Thus it becomes unrealistic to take too much comfort 
from the fact that as of 1954 approximately 3 /\ of the spec- 
tator admissions in the United States were movie tickets. 
Spectator sports attendance and movie attendance de- 
clined, and movie admissions took a smaller share of the 
declining receipts. (Recent increases in gross U.S. movie 
business are generally attributed far more to rising prices 
than to upsurges of regular attendance.) 

New forms of spectator entertainment continued to as- 
sert themselves; more importantly, the amount of time the 
average customer spent as a spectator was now divided be- 
tween outside attractions and being a spectator at home 
via the television set. 

One aspect of the shifting leisure pursuits of the erst- 
while movie fan was that the movie industry shifted with 
him. Movie stars not only went on television, with new 
programs of their own or old backlog movies. The estab- 
lished stars also began extensive personal appearance 
tours, at state fairs, automobile shows, rodeos and the like. 
The 16mm film business in the United States grew to the 
point where Encyclopaedia Britannica Films could guar- 
antee Loew's a half million dollars a year for 16mm rights 
to Metro films and still anticipate a profit of its own. 

Show business began encroaching on the staid preserves 
of the American business community. Dull conventions 
added color with new lavish trade shows; dealers were 
wooed with traveling entertainment packages combining 
modern hard sell and the old fashioned medicine show. 

Community and church activities mushroomed. Little 
theatre groups increased in number and enthusiasm. (All 
these facts are stated in the past tense not because they are 
over, for they certainly continue, but rather because the 
decade which saw their greatest burst of growth is over.) 

Taken singly, none of these facets of the changing lei- 
sure habits of the American consumer can claim major re- 
sponsibility for the draining off of the moviegoing public. 
But taken in toto they were significant influences away 



from the box office of the local Bijou. 

It is often the custom to blame all the movie ills of the 
past ten years on home television. Yet, while people went 
to the movies less, they went out to restaurants more, they 
took more dancing lessons than ever before. Television 
did no harm and possibly much good in stimulating these 
activities. Perhaps there is a clue here to the secret of 
future motion picture theatre audience growth. 

The family that goes out to dine certainly could eat at 
home, just as it could watch movies at home. But when 
they go out to a restaurant, it is a particular treat for the 
lady of the house. She is a guest instead of a combination 
cook and dish washer. She has her chance to dress up a bit 
and relax away from the scene of her daily chores. And 
for the man of the house the restaurant offers the same in- 
ducements, albeit in lesser degree, plus the satisfaction of 
giving some pleasure to his wife. 

How does the modern motion picture theatre compare' 
Let us assume that we are talking about a truly modern 
theatre, not one of the too many thousands of smei-decre- 
pit houses still in operation. Let us also assume that we 
are not talking about a family with either baby-sitter or 
budgetary problems, so that time and ticket price are not 
major consideration. We may even assume that both ends 
of the double feature bill at the theatre are attractive in 
their own way, and that programming is therefore not a 
factor. What then has the theatre itself to offer? 



THEATRE COMPETES IN COMFORTS 



There was a time when first run theatres in most big 
cities were the local showplaces. That is no longer quite 
the case. Neither the service nor the fixtures today are 
quite as impressive. No theatre operator needs to be told 
how difficult an usher problem he has. When the patron 
goes to a restaurant, a host or hostess ushers him to a 
table; when he goes to even a well run movie theatre the 
best service he can usually get from the usher is a "plenty 
of seats down front" or "try the other aisle". Home tele- 
vision has made him somewhat more aware of focus and 
clarity in a picture; he is apt to notice difficulties in this 
connection at the movie. 

These comments are not meant to be an exhaustive dis- 
cussion of theatre operating problems; they are mentioned 
in passing to highlight the fact that as a service the mo- 
tion picture theatre is now competing with other outside- 
the-home services, and that these other services are apt to 
provide more attractive creature comforts. An outstand- 
ingly successful motion picture, of course, can overcome 
the service deficiencies of a theatre; but this means an 
added burden for the picture and the whole industry. 

Changing leisure habits are still changing, and the mo- 
tion picture industry inevitably changes too. But there 
has been an all too consistent lag between the former and 
the latter. It is never enough to find out how things have 
changed in the past; to insure its growth, any industry 
must be one step ahead of the changes its customers are 
going to make tomorrow. 



Film BULLETIN April I, 1957 Page 11 




Amcng the items in the report 
(which will come as no surprise to 
those readers of Film BULLETIN 
who have been following our "Pat- 
terns of Patronage" series) are 
these: 

1. More women are msrrying, and 
they are marrying younger. Dr. 
David predicts that about 90 per 
cent of all U.S. women will marry. 
The average marrying age for wo- 
men is just over 20. 

2. Most significantly in the wcrds 
of Dr. David, "The career woman, 
in the traditional sense, has prob- 
ably disappeared. A woman no 
longer has to choose between get- 
ting married and having children, 
and making a place for herself in the 
world of work. A larger proportion 
than ever before of the working 
women are married and have chil- 
dren; and more of them are working 
more years of their lives." 

3. Dr. David says that there arc 
now fewer childless women than in 
the past. Estimates of future papu- 
lation trends suggest that only 5 
per cent of all married woman will 
be childless. Two out of every five 
American women who have children 
in school are working for wages, for 
example; and one out of every three 
members of our working population 
today is a woman. In case anybody 
is still wondering what happened to 
matinee business, this may be part 
of the answer. 

Dr. David's statistics are worth 
the consideration of movie people. 
Any attack on the overall attend- 
ance problem can only benefit from 
a fuller understanding of the poten- 
tial audience. 

The Post Office Department has 
issued a statement entitled "Ele- 
ments of A Lottery," which the 
Council of Motion Picture Organi- 
zations has been good enough to dis- 
tribute. It is a statement ostensibly 
prepared for the assistance of busi- 
nessmen and of the public generally, 
but like so many weil-meant state- 
ments we fear that its effect will be 
something else again. 



The Post Office Department does 
not have authority to prevent or po- 
lice lotteries, giveaway schemes and 
related types of promotion. The 
postal authorities, however, do have 
control over what goes through the 
mails ; and since newspapers con- 
stantly go through the mails, an- 
nouncements in the press dealing 
with contests, prize offers for the 
first fifty patrons at the theatre and 
so forth come within the postal jur- 
isdiction. 

This means, practically speaking, 
that the newspapers will undoubt- 
edly be reminded of the potential 
hazards in news of this kind ; and in 
turn, such news will be more diffi- 
cult to place in the paper. Even 
more interesting is the point that 
paid advertising of such contests 
may fall within the same postal pro- 
hibition. 

The three elements of a lottery, 
under terms of the postal regula- 
tions, are defined as consideration, 
chance and prize. Any time you of- 
fer a prize to selected members of 
the paying audience at the theatre, 
you are two-thirds of the way to- 
ward what the Post Office regards 
as a lottery. If the selection of the 
recipients of the prize is based on 
numbers drawn from a hat, or on a 
game like Bingo, then by postal defi- 
nition you are conducting a lottery, 
and no newspaper that goes through 
the mails can carry news or adver- 
tising about it. 

One favorite device of theatre 
managers is to offer a prize cf some 
kind to the first fifty customers, as 
we have noted above. This is spe- 
cifically defined in the postal state- 
ment as involving "the element of 
chance" and hence apt to be banned 
from the mails. Possibly one way 
to avoid such banning is to offer the 
prizes to the first fifty patrons be- 
fore they buy tickets — while they 
are still lined up outside the box 
office — so that they do not have to 
pay a consideration to be eligible. 

Coming at a time when the indus- 
try is more contest-minded than for 
some years past, the Post Office 
statement has an importance far be- 
yond the technical legal points it 
raises. 




To the Editor: 

The cooperation which has ex- 
isted in the past twelve to eighteen 
months between the two larger ex- 
hibitor organizations is continuing 
on a most satisfactory basis. 

I can agree with you, however, 
that it is my considered opinion that 
exhibition in particular and the in- 
dustry in general would be better 
with one national organization. No 
one so far has come up with a plan 
for such a development. Some years 
ago the ideologies and philosophies 
of the two organizations were so far 
apart that there could never have 
been any program at that time 
which would have brought the two 
groups together. However, during 
recent months I feel there has been 
considerab